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mms
13-03-2005, 07:06 PM
group of artists and historians that archive and document the recent history of the Lebanon.
i like
http://www.theatlasgroup.org/aga.html

rupture
16-03-2005, 03:19 PM
it's great work. very playful in its way. from what i understand the Atlas Group is essentially Walid Raad's solo project. Bidoun magazine did a piece on him recently, and I think the NYTimes or somewhere had a blurb as well, several months ago.

mms
16-03-2005, 04:21 PM
it's great work. very playful in its way. from what i understand the Atlas Group is essentially Walid Raad's solo project. Bidoun magazine did a piece on him recently, and I think the NYTimes or somewhere had a blurb as well, several months ago.


a mag i picked up called cabinet did a piece on the car bomb photos.
it's an inspiring mag as it goes, outta nyc. http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/
sick squid english sterling.

pfflam
19-04-2005, 03:56 AM
Hello people

I'm new here . . . .



I also saw Walid Raad give a presentation of the Atlas Group . . . it was a lecture/performance that included video from 'serveillance' cameras re-edited by 'off-duty 'guards, etc . . . . all of it was a mock up of a fictional group . . . he even had plants in the audience for specifically pointed questions during the Q&A. The artificial frame allowed the video to explore diverse areas and still maintain a kind of unified impact, and, they could even swing slightly towards sentiment and not be mawkish in the least . . .

By far the best art-related event I've seen in a long time.

(BTW: in my possible future postings, I type fast and am dyslexic, so I WILL spell atrosiasoly . . .ok?!)

juliand
19-04-2005, 07:30 AM
I'm interested in Raad's work.

Its important to note that not all of it is faked; indeed lots of the material he presents is research-based, or discovered. The lines are blurred between the fictional, the manipulated, the interpreted, and the found. I found myself deeply into it, but feeling a little strange, too: first, because some of the audience seemed not to quite understand that the things they were seeing were not quite, or not all true--they seemed to think he was "speaking up for the lebanese!"--and second, because I felt like I had been folded into a game I'd not totally consented to playing. It's obviously brilliant work, but I've yet to completely think through the implications of my discomfort while it was happening.

pfflam
20-04-2005, 06:27 AM
Discomfort is a good term . . . I liked that, I thought he used it well.
I do have some qualms with regards to the aestheticizing of real politics . . . and ordinarily I would climb a high horse there, but I felt that his presentation was disarming and seemed to handle the issue in a transparent way . . anyone looking for real information must have understood early on that this was not a real historical archiving project . . . the swerves and poetics were too clear. They would have found some information that was not faked, and thats 'useful' . . . but what was faked was either unbelievable or simply too poetic to matter in a functionalist historical way . . . . the information that he explored is not just data and dates and measurements but a human element that I think he lends to the otherwise merely historical . . . an historical approach may be of significance in an emotional and immediate sense to many, but not felt as such to everybody . . . his work seemed to offer that possible perception . . . at least I felt it did. It expanded my understanding of that history . . .

But then again, I'm an American (well . ..half) and I'm supposed to not care about history . right?! ;)