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View Full Version : wot childrens books still haunt your imagination



luka
29-05-2010, 10:22 AM
the magic box-john mansfield
the one by the man who did wild things thats not wild things, its about a boy who falls into a mixing bowl or something.

craner
29-05-2010, 10:35 AM
Not a book, but...The Monster Munch adverts. The one in the swamp.

luka
29-05-2010, 11:12 AM
i will accept answers like craners. it is a good one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7CpMITDLYc

PeteUM
29-05-2010, 11:50 AM
the magic box-john mansfield
the one by the man who did wild things thats not wild things, its about a boy who falls into a mixing bowl or something.


Came here to put that when I saw the thread title. Mickey In The Night Kitchen, I think. His suit of dough!

PeteUM
29-05-2010, 11:54 AM
And The Runaway Roller Skate. Haunting my son's imagination with my old copy these days.

DannyL
29-05-2010, 11:54 AM
I have a deep abiding love for Ursula's Le Guin's The Wizrd of Earthsea. Great book, which is a comfort read for me - I probably read it about once a year.

Sectionfive
29-05-2010, 12:03 PM
Has to be chicken licken or the one with mud puddle

luka
29-05-2010, 12:52 PM
the phantom tollbooth-norman juster

routes
29-05-2010, 01:59 PM
I was the same with the earthsea books by ursula le guin. They seemed so vivid and cool. And the dark is rising trilogy by susan hill..

I loved sendak's monsters, used to spend hours tracing them and learning to draw them. They were in my dreams and nightmares long into my teens..

The wolf in the neverending story, the bit in the swamp of despair..

luka
29-05-2010, 02:21 PM
I ENJOYED ALL THOSE TOo/

vimothy
29-05-2010, 04:06 PM
Wizbit

Ulysses 31 (so fucked up)

The dozers from Fraggle Rock

bobbin
29-05-2010, 05:41 PM
from when i was very young:

burglar bill. real life innit, the most haunting thing of all? ;)

the other janet and alan alberg one with the skeletons, i think there was something about the way they used language that imprinted it on you.

a book about the apollo 11 moon mission that i made my mum read to me over and over again apparently, before i could read it myself.

subvert47
29-05-2010, 07:36 PM
I have a deep abiding love for Ursula's Le Guin's The Wizrd of Earthsea. Great book, which is a comfort read for me - I probably read it about once a year.

Yes, and it's beautifully written :)

Have you read the later books? (starting with Tehanu) — in which she reconfigures the magical element from a sort of feminist viewpoint, essentially portraying "men's magic" as a mistake. It's well done, but you have to read them twice to appreciate it. The first time through you don't get where the story is going (because it's not going where you expect/want it to go).


the phantom tollbooth-norman juster

One of my all-time favourite books :)


And the dark is rising trilogy by susan hill..

by Susan Cooper — and there are five books ;)

I guess The Dark is Rising itself is the best, though The Grey King is also very good, and I have a certain fondness for Greenwitch.

Others...

Richard Adams - Watership Down
Rosemary Sutcliff's Roman Britain books: The Eagle of the Ninth, The Lantern Bearers, etc
some of Robert Westall's supernatural books: The Wind Eye, The Devil on the Road
John Christopher's Prince in Waiting trilogy

Patrick Ness's Chaos Walking trilogy is also very good — but those are recent, so I can't say they "still haunt my imagination" or anything.

Brother Randy Hickey
29-05-2010, 08:18 PM
my favourite kids book involved a kid who looks through a magic telescope and ends up in a strange, frankly psychedelic world full of weird logic, some kind of Captain America type superhero and much oddness. Wish to fuck I could remember the name..

loved all the Roald Dahl books too..

routes
29-05-2010, 08:34 PM
Big yes to watership down, only read it after watching the cartoon tho.
And yes, susan cooper :] susan hill wrote woman in black *demonic-laughter*

mistersloane
29-05-2010, 09:28 PM
Not a book, but I saw The Beast With Five Fingers

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gd7jzxy4GI8

when I was must have been 7 - I liked black and white films. I still dunno how I ended up being allowed to watch it but it gave me nightmares for fucking years afterwards.

sufi
30-05-2010, 02:13 AM
burglar bill
that's a nice dvd player, i'll 'ave that :D

luka
30-05-2010, 07:13 AM
Ulysses 31 (so fucked up)

The dozers from Fraggle Rock

respect to you sir...
me too, absolutely....

Woebot
31-05-2010, 07:41 PM
goodnight moon

HMGovt
31-05-2010, 09:46 PM
http://www.tv-ark.org.uk/mivana/mediaplayer.php?id=cce0145a91b69064fb7d4e2a37f6603 4&media=thebooktower78open&type=mp4

This was full of haunting, every week. The carnivorous stalking shadow story was a good un

HMGovt
31-05-2010, 09:53 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZ4c1X5ene8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZ4c1X5ene8

massrock
31-05-2010, 10:05 PM
I have the title music in French on a 7".

PeteUM
31-05-2010, 11:01 PM
I have the title music in French on a 7".

Must memorise this phrase for general hipster usage. :D

nochexxx
03-06-2010, 07:47 AM
Graham Oakleys Magical Changes

this book still haunts my dreams. anyone else come across it?

"It allows the reader to create 512 different surreal pictures by mixing the top and bottom half of pages (even the original pictures are really strange). The illustrations are extremely detailed and delightful, and could be enjoyed by Primary/Elementary school-aged and up."

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/510TT1W8DCL._SS500_.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_JE44_BvP3E0/SEUkU3SIKGI/AAAAAAAABZU/6h_HE6wKvks/s400/oakley_svanna.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_zCr7UCjiQp4/Sofo3MmZ8kI/AAAAAAAABck/veeEMM1kRO4/s320/Image0335.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_JE44_BvP3E0/SEUkn3SIKHI/AAAAAAAABZc/1mCR0BR5dWc/s400/oakley_svanna_02.jpg

routes
03-06-2010, 08:41 AM
i vaguely remember some cartoon where the bad guys were these plantmachines... one had a chainsaw thing... that shit was scary...

HMGovt
03-06-2010, 09:06 PM
i vaguely remember some cartoon where the bad guys were these plantmachines... one had a chainsaw thing... that shit was scary...

That'll be Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCOU1k0EKks

Loki
04-06-2010, 10:19 AM
The Green Knowe books.... creepy for no clear reason

A Castle of Bone... something very odd about this that I can't remember... it's the 'A' in the title that throws me... 'The' I could have coped with... best freaky cupboard story ever... fuck you Narnia...

Sponge, X and Y - a surreal tale of fish troubleshooters...

Leon Garfield esp Black Jack...

The Boy With The Bronze Axe

Alan Garner, of course

I Am The Cheese - utterly perplexing and confusing then, still a little weird now... and of course Cormier also wrote The Chocolate War and countless other very close to the bear / bare bones children's stories.... with complex psychosexuals and all kinds of nasty spins...

Mr. Tea
04-06-2010, 10:35 AM
Thirded (or whatever we're up to now) on Watership Down, book and film both.

The only bit I remember from Rosemary Sutcliffe's The Eagle of the Ninth is a scene of some kind of religious ritual witnessed by an AWOL Roman soldier in a chambered burial mound in second-century Scotland. Awesome stuff.

If we're allowed adverts...the "Mister Soft" Trebor softmints ad:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lL6hkpJveM

Of course I was too young to realise at the time that this is quite transparently a visual representation of being on ketamine. And to think they showed this to kids! :eek:

luka
04-06-2010, 11:40 AM
the silver sword....watership down is deep
jayce and the wheeled warriors is amazing

woops
04-06-2010, 02:04 PM
I Am The Cheese - utterly perplexing and confusing then, still a little weird now... and of course Cormier also wrote The Chocolate War and countless other very close to the bear / bare bones children's stories.... with complex psychosexuals and all kinds of nasty spins...

Yeah very nasty, teenagers being properly cruel to each other, I could dig it.

Pestario
04-06-2010, 02:22 PM
Graham Oakleys Magical Changes

this book still haunts my dreams. anyone else come across it?

"It allows the reader to create 512 different surreal pictures by mixing the top and bottom half of pages (even the original pictures are really strange). The illustrations are extremely detailed and delightful, and could be enjoyed by Primary/Elementary school-aged and up."


that book looks great, I would have loved that as a kid

Lambert, a Disney short about a lion raised by sheep, had a scene where Lambert's adoptive sheep mother is dragged away by a wolf all the while screaming while the wolf salivates on her leg. Disturbing for a kid.

Loki
04-06-2010, 09:55 PM
that book looks great, I would have loved that as a kid

maybe for a different thread but... can you tell what you'd have liked as a kid? I'm not sure i can... i have some idea of what I was like but I'm not convinced it's particularly accurate... in fact, i think i liked many more things than i can now remember... i've got a suspicion i only remember the things that i still like now...

nochexxx
05-06-2010, 08:29 PM
that book looks great, I would have loved that as a kid



i hope you would love it now!

STN
07-06-2010, 08:58 AM
The Borribles.

Mr. Tea
07-06-2010, 10:13 AM
Oh god, I just remembered this incredibly macabre book of "children's" fairy-tales I had as a kid, full of all sorts of dark shit like Cindarella's ugly stepsisters mutilating their feet to try and fit the glass slipper, and the slipper filling with blood...all illustrated with these beautiful paintings. The original Hans Christian Anderson stories are pretty dark too, think I may have had a book of those as well.

Pretty much anything by Roald Dahl deserves a shout here, of course.

Pestario
07-06-2010, 10:24 AM
i hope you would love it now!

I'd still love it now, but not in the same way as only a kid can. You know, sitting cross-legged on my bedroom floor, whispering stories to myself about the different pictures, taking the book to school to show my friends only to stuff it back in my bag to hide it from prying eyes...that sort of thing. Rather than talking about it on the internet like I am now

PeteUM
07-06-2010, 10:43 AM
This will probably sound a bit vague but a couple of years ago at my Mum's house I found a book that I'd read many times as a kid but it took me a little while to kind of tune in to the memory of doing so but then suddenly I got this real weird flash on it, so to speak. It was just a simple little 70s paperback with pictures about some kid who goes back in time to a prehistoric era and has encounters with dinosaurs and stuff - very sparse and, don't want to say it but hauntological in that stark 70s oddness sense. Anyway as I say I had this real feeling of being transported back to the emotional charge of reading the book at the time. Oddly for me, although I'm sure this is a commonplace thing with memory, the physical book/story that I had rediscovered didn't seem to have much to do with the memory. For a while I even wondered whether the book had accompanied a TV series, because what I recalled seemed so vivid, rich and atmospheric, and nothing to do with this amatuerishly illustrated, thin half-narrative. Thinking about it now kind of makes me wonder if those kind of factors were making my imagination fill in the gaps, like...uh...prodding some kind of ontological dread at the thought of fetching up in a prehistoric swamp. I mean, even now when I think about the crosshatching on the dinosaurs I'm like "wooooah...".

grizzleb
07-06-2010, 04:38 PM
This will probably sound a bit vague but a couple of years ago at my Mum's house I found a book that I'd read many times as a kid but it took me a little while to kind of tune in to the memory of doing so but then suddenly I got this real weird flash on it, so to speak. It was just a simple little 70s paperback with pictures about some kid who goes back in time to a prehistoric era and has encounters with dinosaurs and stuff - very sparse and, don't want to say it but hauntological in that stark 70s oddness sense. Anyway as I say I had this real feeling of being transported back to the emotional charge of reading the book at the time. Oddly for me, although I'm sure this is a commonplace thing with memory, the physical book/story that I had rediscovered didn't seem to have much to do with the memory. For a while I even wondered whether the book had accompanied a TV series, because what I recalled seemed so vivid, rich and atmospheric, and nothing to do with this amatuerishly illustrated, thin half-narrative. Thinking about it now kind of makes me wonder if those kind of factors were making my imagination fill in the gaps, like...uh...prodding some kind of ontological dread at the thought of fetching up in a prehistoric swamp. I mean, even now when I think about the crosshatching on the dinosaurs I'm like "wooooah...".
I like it, yeah I know exactly what you mean regarding the disparity between the richness of emotion that you can recall and the completely lacking physical thing. Infact I experienced exactly the same thing when I stumbled across a youtube video of 'World of Illusion' - a game for the sega megadrive with Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck. I watched the first couple of levels and it looked so shitty and basic, and yet I remember being 6 or 7 and being amazed by it and the expansive world it implied. I hadn't seen it since then but I was immediately there.

Lichen
07-06-2010, 05:05 PM
The Borribles.

...great covers!

The Weirdstone of Brisinagmanen
The Silver Sword

Dunninger
07-06-2010, 09:22 PM
The Borribles.

Yes! I love them. I reread the books not too long ago and they are still great. If anybody has recommendations for books in a similar direction, I'd like to hear them.

Mr. Tea
07-06-2010, 09:33 PM
Brambly Hedge! (http://www.bramblyhedge.co.uk/frame.htm)

These books are just about the most lovely and gentle thing ever created. I almost feel like I want to have kids purely so I can read these books to them.

Slothrop
07-06-2010, 11:31 PM
The Weirdstone of Brisinagmanen
Not sure - re-read this quite recently and it was kind of disappointingly generic fantasy, most of the concepts reheated from Tolkein. Dark is Rising series and Earthsea books much better for that sort of thing imo.

Swallows and Amazons was ace, and is only enhanced when you subsequently realize that a) the books still read well and plausibly, and are actually quite socially conscious (Coot Club / The Big Six in particular - with the sense that the author's aware that there's social distance between the boat builders' kids and the doctors' and lawyers' kids, but the kids themselves don't really care and get on with it) and b) Ransome was friendly with Trotsky.

Dr Awesome
08-06-2010, 12:07 AM
http://1207books.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/decline_and_fall_of_the_roman_empire.jpg

Chilling apocalyptic fantasy tale for children aged 3-5.

baboon2004
08-06-2010, 10:38 AM
I like it, yeah I know exactly what you mean regarding the disparity between the richness of emotion that you can recall and the completely lacking physical thing. Infact I experienced exactly the same thing when I stumbled across a youtube video of 'World of Illusion' - a game for the sega megadrive with Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck. I watched the first couple of levels and it looked so shitty and basic, and yet I remember being 6 or 7 and being amazed by it and the expansive world it implied. I hadn't seen it since then but I was immediately there.

Yeah, computer games are rich in this kind of thing, although I played Myth on a Spectrum emulator a few months ago (that game being my view of the apotheosis of gaming as a kid) and it held up quite well really.

I'm desperately trying to remember haunting books I read when young....I must have just suppressed them all, which explains a lot of things.

subvert47
08-06-2010, 11:44 AM
Not sure - re-read this quite recently and it was kind of disappointingly generic fantasy, most of the concepts reheated from Tolkein.

Not really from Tolkien, more Welsh and Irish myth. For instance, the Morrigan (more-ian) comes in numerous Irish stories; and The Owl Service is basically a rewriting of part of the Mabinogian.

It's been a while since I read the Weirdstone, but the bits underground are powerfully done as I remember (and far more claustrophobic than the related parts of Tolkien).

The main fault with Garner I always found was that the stories end in such a rush, leaving you feeling a bit unsatisfied.

Slothrop
08-06-2010, 12:44 PM
Not really from Tolkien, more Welsh and Irish myth. For instance, the Morrigan (more-ian) comes in numerous Irish stories; and The Owl Service is basically a rewriting of part of the Mabinogian.

It's been a while since I read the Weirdstone, but the bits underground are powerfully done as I remember (and far more claustrophobic than the related parts of Tolkien).
The Owl Service, totally. (And the Mabinogian is fantastic.)

The bit in Weirdstone where they're trying to get through the horribly narrow tunnels is fantastic (as well as totally playing up to my slightly claustrophobic side) but the orc-things and the elf and all that sort of stuff seems very very tolkein-esque.

subvert47
08-06-2010, 03:14 PM
the orc-things and the elf and all that sort of stuff seems very very tolkein-esque.

Perhaps it's just that the various myths and legends overlap. For instance, the Mara (also in the Weirdstone and related to the Morrigan) come from Old Norse and Old English, which was Tolkien's main area of (professional) interest. And elves, goblins, dwarves, etc figure throughout the various Germanic branches (not sure about Celtic ones).

Mr. Tea
08-06-2010, 04:03 PM
While we're talking fantasy, I'm sure there are more than a few bods here who dug Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy...though their status as strictly "children's" books is questionable. I was a stoodent myself when I read them.

And as the complete polar opposite, a few years ago on a whim I pulled out the old Chronicles of Narnia box set I still have at home for some reason...it's just hilarious, talk about moral absolutes...makes Tolkien look like some glibly amoral po-mo relativist. Also reminded me of some old interview with Pullman, where he talks about reading the Narnia books as a kid and coming across the bit where one of the girls starts to wear makeup, becomes interested in boys etc. (starts turning into a woman, in other words) and is 'punished' for this transgression by being no longer able to visit Narnia: "It was at this point that I realised C. S. Lewis was full of shit". :D

sufi
08-06-2010, 10:28 PM
The Borribles.
...great covers!
yes absolutely ... as recommended my mr barrow iirc for my first book review, what i liked a lot was the way it subverted the wombles into filthy horrible giant rats with pointed stakes, and that there was a wandle tribe, yeah!! - i remember vividly the description of biggest bastard womble's fate - drowning in a cauldron with his final squeals bubbling up 'like a fart in a bathtub'

also
john wyndham .... brilliant

and
(not books, but) those disney wildlife movies with talking animals on over-bright 70s film, they always used to be at the pictures before the main feature

Lichen
09-06-2010, 11:21 AM
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/images/0330268570/sr=8-5/qid=1276078485/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=266239&s=books&qid=1276078485&sr=8-5

HMGovt
09-06-2010, 02:31 PM
http://gamebooks.org/gallery/figfan06.jpg

IdleRich
09-06-2010, 04:58 PM
Wow, so many memories in this thread - Weirdstone, Dark Is Rising, Narnia, Box of Delights, The Night Kitchen, Wizard of Earthsea, The Borribles (but not The Borrowers - could never got on with them for some reason) and so on and so on.
Not seen E Nesbit mentioned, used to love her stuff, also, The Neverending Story was pretty scary as a child - the nothing that was eating everything, a difficult concept to get your head round back then I think. The Lewis Carrol stuff was also magic and headfucking and I think someone mentioned Milo and The Phantom Tollbooth. I used to LOVE reading when I was little.
Also, does anyone remember something about a kid who had nine lives and there was kind of a magic school and stuff (bit like Harry Potter I guess) but he was the best because he was unique and had nine lives in this one dimension instead of one each in nine different dimensions like most people. There was an older magician called Chrestomanci who was the only other person with nine lives and he was the most powerful guy in the world. The young kid with nine lives had them stored as matches in a special book but he refused to believe it was true so he lit one of the matches and he caught fire - that bit stuck with me.
Also, was there something called The Silver Sword trilogy or similar, guess it was sub-Arthurian legend but I loved it at the time.

IdleRich
09-06-2010, 04:58 PM
And the Fighting Fantasy stuff of course.

IdleRich
09-06-2010, 05:01 PM
And Swallows and Amazons - what was the one where the guys were accused of unmooring boats but they managed to catch the culprits in the act with one of those new-fangled camera things? The satisfaction I got at the end when they turned the tables on the bad guys was amazing.

CHAOTROPIC
09-06-2010, 06:04 PM
Also, does anyone remember something about a kid who had nine lives and there was kind of a magic school and stuff (bit like Harry Potter I guess) but he was the best because he was unique and had nine lives in this one dimension instead of one each in nine different dimensions like most people. There was an older magician called Chrestomanci who was the only other person with nine lives and he was the most powerful guy in the world. The young kid with nine lives had them stored as matches in a special book but he refused to believe it was true so he lit one of the matches and he caught fire - that bit stuck with me..

Charmed Life, by the awesome Diana Wynne Jones! This one totally haunted me for years too until I figured out who it was by a few years ago & picked it up. It's part of a series of books (the Chronicles of Chrestomanci) that includes the awesome Witch Week ... another one that totally blew my head off when I was still in single figures. For teenage witches & wizards she totally demolishes that awfully overrated Harry Potter botox hag.

Oh, & 600 million times YES to The Borribles as a bona fide classic!! :cool:

CHAOTROPIC
09-06-2010, 06:08 PM
In case people haven't seen ... a genuine fucking tragedy (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/michael-de-larrabeiti-creator-of-the-borribles-827657.html) ... but what a guy.

petergunn
09-06-2010, 07:12 PM
i remember reading a book about a boy who turned green, it was almost like a sub-phillip dick sci-fi sort of thing that tripped me out when i was like 11... can't remember the name of it...

also the Tripod series (city of gold and lead, the white mountains, the pool of fire) really stock with me...

petergunn
09-06-2010, 07:24 PM
my favourite kids book involved a kid who looks through a magic telescope and ends up in a strange, frankly psychedelic world full of weird logic, some kind of Captain America type superhero and much oddness. Wish to fuck I could remember the name..

l.

this sounds familiar to me for some reason...

i liked books like that when i was 9-12, books that would sorta blow my mind...

i also used to read the "young adult" books from the 70's when i was a kid in the 80's... i remember reading one i found in the stacks at school when i was 8 where the first story was all about a kid ODing on heroin.... ah, that 70's heroin epidemic!

that's a whole genre in and of itself; 70's antidrug books aimed at teens... squalid tales of shooting galleries, crash pads, and the acid casualty who thinks he's a container of orange juice... "Suddenly, I realized I could actually SEE the sound coming out of the speakers. The wailing electric guitar seemed like a bright yellow to me....."

IdleRich
09-06-2010, 08:08 PM
"Charmed Life, by the awesome Diana Wynne Jones! This one totally haunted me for years too until I figured out who it was by a few years ago & picked it up. It's part of a series of books (the Chronicles of Chrestomanci) that includes the awesome Witch Week ... another one that totally blew my head off when I was still in single figures. For teenage witches & wizards she totally demolishes that awfully overrated Harry Potter botox hag."
Nice one - I read the whoie lot of them I think but I've never been able to remember what they were lately.

sufi
09-06-2010, 09:37 PM
In case people haven't seen ... a genuine fucking tragedy (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/michael-de-larrabeiti-creator-of-the-borribles-827657.html) ... but what a guy.
check some of his travel writing here before murdoch's paywall goes up
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/travel/article3806709.ece


shit i also read a shameful amount of enid blyton

michael
10-06-2010, 07:13 AM
Came here to put that when I saw the thread title. Mickey In The Night Kitchen, I think. His suit of dough!

I have a tat of Mickey in his dough plane on one shoulder. Most people can't figure out wtf it is... Still pretty obsessed with that and Where The Wild Things Are.

PeteUM
10-06-2010, 09:20 AM
I have a tat of Mickey in his dough plane on one shoulder. Most people can't figure out wtf it is... Still pretty obsessed with that and Where The Wild Things Are.

Very dreamlike...uh... sensual book.

http://static.open.salon.com/files/mickey1235846311.jpg


http://www.peteglover.com/images/books/nightkitchen1.jpg

Crikey. I don't really have a thing for tattoos but if I met a woman with one of those I'd be like a one-eyed cat in a seafood store.

dave
10-06-2010, 10:19 AM
I think he's hitting on you michael.

PeteUM
10-06-2010, 10:29 AM
He he. Fly me to where the wild things are Michael.

dave
10-06-2010, 10:32 AM
As far as Sendak goes Outside Over There is the scariest. There's a bit where some goblins creep into a girl's bedroom, turn her baby sister into ice and steal her. The ice baby looks horrid. Good fun reading that to preschoolers.

If it sounds familiar that's because your parents also read you scary books when you were small. Or maybe you saw the movie Labyrinth which was kinda based off it.


Brambly Hedge! (http://www.bramblyhedge.co.uk/frame.htm)

These books are just about the most lovely and gentle thing ever created. I almost feel like I want to have kids purely so I can read these books to them.
I didn't know those book when I was little but we have one now and my boys love it. Wilfred is cool.

subvert47
11-06-2010, 03:31 PM
The bit in Weirdstone where they're trying to get through the horribly narrow tunnels is fantastic (as well as totally playing up to my slightly claustrophobic side) but the orc-things and the elf and all that sort of stuff seems very very tolkein-esque.

Just re-read it, along with The Moon Of Gomrath. I thought they were both pretty good – though, as I remembered, they end in too much of a rush. And yes, the stuff in the little tunnels is as scary as ever. You can feel yourself heading for a total shitfunk panic just reading it.

Corpsey
21-12-2016, 03:39 PM
The intro to this used to really disturb me

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzDcJEFkbjU

So much so that I refuse to watch it even to this day.

craner
21-12-2016, 09:51 PM
Owliver by Robert Krauss, all Richard Scarrey's books particularly The Great Pie Robbery, plus a Benjamin book about a tragic Baptist teddy bear who was locked up with a toy elephant and had to make paper wings to fly to his chapel. These were all formative, but a bit disturbing.

CrowleyHead
22-12-2016, 01:47 AM
171

As you may may not know, that's the government, so...