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mistersloane
08-07-2010, 04:16 PM
Supreme Court judge Lord Rodger said gay people’s right to live freely must be protected.
He said: “Just as male hetero sexuals are free to enjoy themselves playing rugby, drinking beer and talking about girls with their mates, so male homosexuals are to be free to enjoy themselves going to Kylie concerts, drinking exotically-coloured cocktails and talking about boys with their straight female mates.”

Wow. I feel so free to exist without demeaning prejudicial stereotyping.

crackerjack
08-07-2010, 04:19 PM
Supreme Court judge Lord Rodger said gay people’s right to live freely must be protected.
He said: “Just as male hetero sexuals are free to enjoy themselves playing rugby, drinking beer and talking about girls with their mates, so male homosexuals are to be free to enjoy themselves going to Kylie concerts, drinking exotically-coloured cocktails and talking about boys with their straight female mates.”

Wow. I feel so free to exist without demeaning prejudicial stereotyping.

Are these strictly defined parameters to our freedom? I mean, as a straight man do I have to play rugby? If I went gay to avoid it, would I have to listen to Kylie?

mistersloane
08-07-2010, 04:22 PM
Are these strictly defined parameters to our freedom? I mean, as a straight man do I have to play rugby? If I went gay to avoid it, would I have to listen to Kylie?

Yup, otherwise you'd better get the heck outta Dodge, buddy.

mistersloane
08-07-2010, 04:25 PM
God I was having a good day til I read that. This is progress?

droid
08-07-2010, 04:28 PM
It is progress surely? Isnt this the first time that anyone has been granted asylum because of persecution based on their sexuality?

http://enemiesofreason.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/asylumgay.jpg

Mr. Tea
08-07-2010, 04:35 PM
A typical homosexual, yesterday:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_5BV_YADVD7o/Rge4DWLajbI/AAAAAAAAAbE/0u5_uUSkArA/s320/elton+john.jpg

Edit: what about lesbians? Are they presumably granted the universal freedom to play golf, listen to KD Lang and wear dungarees?

mistersloane
08-07-2010, 04:48 PM
It is progress surely? Isnt this the first time that anyone has been granted asylum because of persecution based on their sexuality?

http://enemiesofreason.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/asylumgay.jpg

Yeah course it's progress, don't get me wrong, it's just the stereotyping that depresses me. It's like one step forward and two steps back.

ed : Actually, it doesn't depress me, it makes me blindly, furiously angry.

mistersloane
08-07-2010, 04:49 PM
A typical homosexual, yesterday:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_5BV_YADVD7o/Rge4DWLajbI/AAAAAAAAAbE/0u5_uUSkArA/s320/elton+john.jpg

Edit: what about lesbians? Are they presumably granted the universal freedom to play golf, listen to KD Lang and wear dungarees?

Lol never seen that picture before. Lesbians don't count because they still don't officially exist in the UK, do they? Queen Victoria and all that.

droid
08-07-2010, 05:02 PM
Yeah course it's progress, don't get me wrong, it's just the stereotyping that depresses me. It's like one step forward and two steps back.

ed : Actually, it doesn't depress me, it makes me blindly, furiously angry.

Not to negate your anger/depression, but surely the landmark decision for gay rights overshadows the stupid language of the judge?

Its more like 20 steps forward whilst the officials prattle on about how effeminate your shorts are. ;)

Something to be happy about anyway. I wonder how this will affect JA asylum seekers?

droid
08-07-2010, 05:06 PM
http://enemiesofreason.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/starscum1.jpg

Mr. Tea
08-07-2010, 05:12 PM
Queen Victoria and all that.

Methings she doth protest too much - I bet she was a raving vagetarian in her spare time.

droid
09-07-2010, 10:00 AM
http://nhojj.bandcamp.com/track/the-gay-warrior-song

STN
09-07-2010, 10:12 AM
male homosexuals are to be free to enjoy themselves going to Kylie concerts, drinking exotically-coloured cocktails and talking about boys with their straight female mates.”



I love the idea that one would travel to the UK from some far-away country having been given a load of shit, leaving all your mates and family, go through all the hassles of getting asylum, and then immediately sit down and start doing all these things: 'right then, where's my pineapple margarita...'

highhhness
15-07-2010, 01:38 PM
It is progress surely? Isnt this the first time that anyone has been granted asylum because of persecution based on their sexuality?

Not the first, although I think grants on the basis are pretty low. the judgement doesn't really say anything about the 'discretion' argument either - that you can go back to a different bit of the country and you know, just be a bit secret about it.

Never fear though - anne widdecombe has a view. vaguely powell-esque, the last line, i thought...http://www.express.co.uk/ourcomments/view/186704

IdleRich
15-07-2010, 04:32 PM
Unbelievable


"It (the asylum system) was not designed to fund economic aspiration or facilitate lifestyles but to save people in real and pressing danger."

highhhness
15-07-2010, 04:52 PM
Unbelievable

not really. it's age-old lifestyle choice vs. state of being, with a healthy dose of xenophobia chucked in. and wholesale missing of the point that you'd still need to evidence your claim and prove ongoing danger of individual persecution - and presumably an innate liking for kylie - rather than just turn up, limp up your wrist and state your gayness.

it's positive anyway, overall.

Mr. Tea
15-07-2010, 05:08 PM
Arguing with this kind of bigotry is invariably going to be as rewarding as bashing your head against a brick wall, but has anyone got any figures on the actual number of asylum applicants this ruling is likely to affect each year? My guess is that it's probably going to be pretty tiny compared to either refugees fleeing persecution on other grounds or war/famine/disaster generally, or to economic migrants, whether they're here legally or not.

IdleRich
15-07-2010, 05:09 PM
Sometimes I forget what utter cunts these people are... but then they go and remind you.

Mr. Tea
15-07-2010, 05:29 PM
It just demonstrates exactly the kind of prejudice these poor people are fleeing in the first place.

highhhness
15-07-2010, 05:37 PM
Sometimes I forget what utter cunts these people are... but then they go and remind you.

quite.

i take it back re: the discretion argument - supreme court actually expressly rejected that:

In 2009 the Court of Appeal determined that asylum could be refused if it was considered that it would be ‘reasonably tolerable’ for the applicant to conceal their sexual identity in their country of origin. On 7 July 2010 the Supreme Court unanimously rejected this argument. The Court found that a person must not be expected to suppress their sexual orientation in order to avoid future persecution, and issued detailed guidance on the approach to be taken towards these cases in the future.

MPs briefing here (http://www.parliament.uk/briefingpapers/commons/lib/research/briefings/snha-05618.pdf)

I'm not sure that there is a resource that details reasons for claiming asylum proportionately across cases - would happily be corrected on that. It would depend on UKBA to compile it, I think, and they have trouble picking up the phone/adhering to the law, and so on. Although I'd guess Mr Tea's right on proportionately less claims based on sexuality than general conflict/political persecution. And also about the brick wall.

LGBT-related judgements here (http://www.bailii.org/cgi-bin/sino_search_1.cgi?sort=rank&query=homosexual%20and%20asylum&method=boolean&highlight=1&mask_path=/), out of interest.

sufi
15-07-2010, 09:36 PM
... has anyone got any figures on the actual number of asylum applicants this ruling is likely to affect each year? My guess is that it's probably going to be pretty tiny ...
I'm not sure that info is systematically collected, but if anyone knows it would be UKLGIG (http://www.uklgig.org.uk/index.htm).

I guess an FoI request to UKBA (http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/about-us/freedom-of-information/released-information1/) will be met with "o sorry we don't record number of claims on the grounds of sexual orientation" - but it might be worth a try, so i've done one :)

did anyone see sorious samura's documentary on 'africa's last taboo' this week? good gear & very timely

highhhness
16-07-2010, 01:19 AM
I guess an FoI request to UKBA (http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/about-us/freedom-of-information/released-information1/) will be met with "o sorry we don't record number of claims on the grounds of sexual orientation" - but it might be worth a try, so i've done one :)

gwarn sufi. really interested to see what this turns up.

sufi
01-09-2010, 05:23 PM
gwarn sufi. really interested to see what this turns up.
fuckall as expected
http://dunia.gebnet.co.uk/New Picture (88).jpg
http://dunia.gebnet.co.uk/New Picture (7).jpg
http://dunia.gebnet.co.uk/New Picture (66).jpg

any more ideas for FoI??????
perhaps if we combine or £600 per request we could bid for liberating some actual information

droid
01-09-2010, 06:24 PM
fuckall as expected
http://dunia.gebnet.co.uk/New Picture (88).jpg
http://dunia.gebnet.co.uk/New Picture (7).jpg
http://dunia.gebnet.co.uk/New Picture (66).jpg

any more ideas for FoI??????
perhaps if we combine or £600 per request we could bid for liberating some actual information

They seem to be saying that they dont/cant keep records of each applicants sexual orientation, but you didnt ask for that, you asked them for cases where the grounds for application was persecution based on sexual orentation. It might be worth pointing this out.

Also - just ask them for a years worth of cases. If they say thats still too expensive ask for 6 months and so on. Get other people to make up the shortfall with their own applications. Im sure you could adapt your request into a form letter. Maybe contact one of the Gay rights groups for help?

mistersloane
02-09-2010, 11:50 PM
Would they not have a duty with regard to equalities legislation? Maybe asking whether they act in accordance with their duty therein might be another way round it.

Fascinating stuff sufi.

Saw that dispatches on africa and homosexuality, really good programme, thanks for pointing it out.

mistersloane
02-09-2010, 11:51 PM
They seem to be saying that they dont/cant keep records of each applicants sexual orientation, but you didnt ask for that, you asked them for cases where the grounds for application was persecution based on sexual orentation. It might be worth pointing this out.

Totally brilliant point droid, well spotted, they seem to have totally 'misunderstood' the question.

highhhness
06-09-2010, 07:16 PM
Also - just ask them for a years worth of cases. If they say thats still too expensive ask for 6 months and so on. Get other people to make up the shortfall with their own applications. I'm sure you could adapt your request into a form letter.

they'll say a year or even 6 months exceeds the £600, I think. I think it's roughly 1500 - and at least 1000 - asylum decisions every month. with 15-20% granted, that's potentially around 200 files to audit. Conceivably someone could do that in 3.5 days. I'd happily select a month for my own request - any other takers?

crackerjack
27-01-2011, 01:51 PM
sign up - she's due for deportation tomorrow

http://allout.org/en/brenda/sign

droid
27-01-2011, 01:57 PM
done

baboon2004
27-01-2011, 02:14 PM
did anyone see sorious samura's documentary on 'africa's last taboo' this week? good gear & very timely

i'm sure you've already seen it, but the doc with his footage on the Sierra Leone conflict (available on youtube) is both amazing and sickening.

signed the petition and will put it up on facebook.

"Her initial asylum claim was rejected in part on the basis that there was not sufficient evidence that she is a lesbian." Fucking hell.

Mr. Tea
27-01-2011, 03:39 PM
Signed - though I'm always dubious about the effectiveness of online petitions...

Edit: Jesus, anyone seen this? Ugandan gay-rights activist beaten to death. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12295718)


Police have confirmed the death of David Kato but say they are investigating the circumstances.

Uganda's Rolling Stone newspaper published the photographs of several people it said were gay next to a headline reading "Hang them".

Unbelievable:


Rolling Stone editor Giles Muhame told Reuters news agency he condemned the murder and that the paper had not wanted gays to be attacked.

"There has been a lot of crime, it may not be because he is gay," he said.

"We want the government to hang people who promote homosexuality, not for the public to attack them."

Oh right, thanks for clearing that up. For a moment there I thought you were a vile bigot.

baboon2004
27-01-2011, 04:15 PM
(1) Anyone got any examples of online petitions that have had a real effect? Would be interesting to know...

(2) I read too quickly and thought you were talking about the mediocre US rock publication. That was a weird moment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyEFfL9GbRw Samura doc Sufi mentioned is here, for anyone interested.

Mr. Tea
27-01-2011, 04:42 PM
(1) Anyone got any examples of online petitions that have had a real effect? Would be interesting to know...


Yeah, I hate to sound cynical and I know it's lovely to feel like you're doing something to help, but I have to wonder if anything that takes that little effort is really going to do much good. Also I don't know if the whole idea of petitions hasn't perhaps been debased a bit by all those hilarious attempts to get 'Jedi' recognised as a religion, Jeremy Clarkson made prime minister, etc. etc.

highhhness
27-01-2011, 05:12 PM
Oh right, thanks for clearing that up. For a moment there I thought you were a vile bigot.

the role of US-based evangelists in the uganda situation - and elsewhere - is particularly pernicious, and a disturbingly globally aware move on their part. Check out The Call:

The Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009, introduced last October by parliamentarian David Bahati, had its origins in a March 2009 visit by three anti-gay American evangelists—Scott Lively, Caleb Lee Brundidge, and Don Schmierer—who gave a series of talks and workshops about fighting the “homosexual agenda” and protecting children from being “recruited” to homosexuality. The activists later denied playing a role in the bill’s creation. As documented by Jeff Sharlet, Bahati, who made an appearance at The Call on Sunday, also had strong links to The Family, the powerful network of evangelical elites embedded in the Washington DC political culture.

Mr. Tea
27-01-2011, 05:25 PM
the role of US-based evangelists in the uganda situation - and elsewhere - is particularly pernicious, and a disturbingly globally aware move on their part. Check out The Call:


Yup, there was a thread about it at the time: http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?10253-US-Backed-Uganda-Anti-Gay-Bill

highhhness
27-01-2011, 05:56 PM
Yup, there was a thread about it at the time: http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?10253-US-Backed-Uganda-Anti-Gay-Bill

brilliant, ta.

Dr Awesome
27-01-2011, 07:49 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euXQbZDwV0w

(Maybe NSFW)

This is possibly the greatest video on youtube.
I love how the guy has been doing some "research".

Mr. Tea
31-01-2011, 10:21 AM
Anyone else get this email? Maybe I spoke too soon about internet petitions!


Dear Friends,

Talk about a cliffhanger. On Friday, Brenda Namigadde was placed on a 9:20pm flight en route to Uganda, by UK border officials. Then, at the eleventh hour, an injunction stopping her deportation was granted, and Brenda was taken off the flight shortly before takeoff!1

One week ago, Brenda’s plight was virtually unknown, and her deportation back to Uganda, where beloved gay rights activist David Kato was murdered just this week,2 was all but certain. But because you and more than 60,000 others sent letters, marched in London, and shared her story, we built an international outcry that was too loud for Home Secretary Theresa May and other UK officials to ignore.

It’s amazing news, but the story isn’t over...

On Wednesday, Brenda will have her asylum claim revisited - the court will decide once and for all to approve or deny her request to live openly and freely in the UK. The situation looks positive with many supporters emerging in her defense, but until Wednesday we’ll be keeping the pressure on Theresa May and the UK government to live up to its promise to prioritize LGBT asylum claims.3

As Brenda’s story unfolds, alarming news is also emerging about the haphazard, and sometimes downright offensive, ways that LGBT asylum cases are processed.4 It has now been revealed, for example, that Brenda’s original asylum claim was rejected because a judge deemed it odd that Brenda didn’t read or own “gay magazines.”5 The deeper we dig, the clearer it becomes that the system designed to protect people fleeing persecution is terribly broken and demands our attention.

We will keep you up-to-date this week as we continue to stand with Brenda and others like her whose courage inspires us. Thank you and stay tuned...

All best and All Out,
Andre, Jeremy, Joseph, Tile, Wesley and the rest of the team at All Out

PS - If you haven’t already done so, please spread the word about Brenda’s story:
http://www.allout.org/brenda/taf

SOURCES:

1. Ugandan lesbian wins temporary reprieve from deportation
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/28/uganda-lesbian-deportation-death-gay

2. Ugandan Who Spoke Up for Gays Is Beaten to Death
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/28/world/africa/28uganda.html

3. Gay asylum seekers win appeal to stay
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/gay-asylum-seekers-win-appeal-to-stay-2020354.html

4. For Gays Seeking Asylum in the U.S., a New Hurdle
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/29/nyregion/29asylum.html

5. Ugandan lesbian’s asylum appeal rejected because she didn’t read gay magazines or other media
http://www.pinknews.co.uk/2011/01/30/ugandan-lesbians-asylum-appeal-rejected-because-she-didnt-own-gay-magazines/

sufi
07-03-2011, 04:42 PM
Anyone else get this email? Maybe I spoke too soon about internet petitions!
last minute injunction by her legal rep probably more effective tbh


this progress on the FoI request
i wrote

Dear Madam or Sir,

I would like to thank you for your response to the request below dated 23rd August 2010, Your Ref FOI 15527.

However, your response did not address the question that I asked, in that you responded that you do not or cannot keep records of each asylum applicants' sexual orientation, which was not the information I asked for. My request was for information on the number of cases where the grounds for application was persecution based on sexual orientation.

I would like to make a fresh request for this information, although if you would prefer to reinstate the original request that would be fine,
Your response stated that you would not be able to gather the information requested as there is a limit to the cost that you are prepared to expend on the request. In that case please provide information on cases of asylum claims made on the grounds of sexual orientation over the past year, or if that is not feasible under the cost limit referred to, as many quarter years as resources permit. I assume that a breakdown of how the expenditure is calculated will be included.

Additionally, I would like to request information on any steps that UKBA or other Home Office departments have taken or are planning to take to monitor or otherwise address the number of asylum claims made on the grounds of sexual orientation or to address other issues relating to that group of claims, for example ensuring that determinations take into account appropriate and relevant country of origin guidance and are made by appropriately trained caseworkers.

I look forward to receiving your response, preferably by email,

Many Thanks Again,

Yours Sincerely
they replied

Regional Director for London and South East's Office
14th Floor, Long Wing, Lunar House
40 Wellesley Road
Croydon CR9 2BY
HomeOffice
UK Border
Agency

Web www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk

2 March 2011
Ref: FOI 17640
Dear Mr XXXXX

Thank you for your email of 6 February to the UK Border Agency Freedom of Information
Team about lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (lGBT) asylum applications. This falls
to be dealt with under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

It is noted that you previously made a request for this information and received a reply on 23
August 2010, however, you did not feel that the response given answered your question. You
have requested information on the number of asylum claims made on the grounds of sexual
orientation over the past few years (ie annual figures since 2004) and if possible the amount
of positive decisions, refusals, appeals and allowed appeals and this was not provided in the
previous response.

You have further stated that if there is a cost limit that you would request that data is
provided for as many quarters as possible and that a breakdown of how the expenditure was
calculated is provided.

As you will appreciate the reasons for asylum applications vary enormously with many being
very specific to the individual concerned. The Agency does not routinely record, on a central
database, the grounds of application. Instead applications are simply listed as asylum
applications with the detail being confined to the person's individual case record. Tnerefore
to provide the data you have requested it would be necessary to look at each individual
application for asylum and manually record the reason for application.

Between 2004 and the 3rdquarter of 2010 approximately 175,000 applications for asylum
have been made. As stated above to obtain the information required we would need to look
at each individual application for asylum. We believe such an approach would breach the
£600 limit which relates to FOI requests. The £600 limit applies to all central government
departments and is based on work being carried out at a rate of £25 per hour, which equates
to 3 ~ days work per request. Prescribed costs include those which cover the cost of
locating and retrieving information, and preparing our response to you. They do not include
considering whether any information is exempt from disclosure, overheads such as heating
or lighting, or disbursements such as photocopying or postage.

You have stated that if we believe that your original request exceeded the cost threshold
then you would request that we provided you with as many quarters of information as could
be provided within the threshold. In the first 3 quarters of 2010 there were 13,160
applications for asylum. Given the threshold test above even within you refined request it
would not be possible to extract even 1 quarters information within the £600 limit. This is due
to the need to individually extrapolate information from each asylum application and the time
this would take. We have worked this out on the basis that it would take a trained person 10
minutes to go through the case record and ascertain the basis of claim for each individual
application.

Although your request would at present be too costly to answer if you refine it so that it falls
under the cost limit we will consider it further. However, if your new request would still require
a search of a substantial number of individual case records, thereby also exceeding the £600
cost threshold, we may decline to answer.

You have also asked whether any steps are being taken by UKBA or other Home Office
departments to monitor or otherwise address the number of asylum claims made on the
grounds of sexual orientation or to address other issues relating to that group of claims, for
example ensuring that determinations take into account appropriate and relevant country of
origin guidance and are made by appropriately trained caseworkers.

The Agency is looking at how data on sexual orientation cases can be recorded more
effectively and at whether any resulting data can be published in future. This has included
asking case owners to begin recording manually where the Supreme Court ruling applies.
Because the data was recorded manually, and not as part of an established system, the
information collected is not robust. It is being used solely as indicative management
information and not as a basis for drawing significant conclusion or for developing policy.
Specific guidance on how to implement the Supreme Court ruling was quickly developed for
caseworkers, with the valuable assistance of internal and external partners including a
number of LGBT groups and organisations. This new asylum instruction 'Sexual orientation
and gender identity' was published in October 2010.

The UK Border Agency has also developed a training course which supports the new
guidance and helps decision makers to determine applications brought on the grounds of
sexual orientation in a sensitive manner that acknowledges the difficulties, trauma and
alienation that people bringing these claims may have experienced in their country of origin.
External partners have provided valuable input into this course. The course has been rolled
out nationwide and training of caseowners will be completed in February. Both the guidance
and training will be subject to ongoing audit and evaluation.

If you are dissatisfied with this response you may request an independent internal review of
our handling of your request. Internal review requests should be submitted within two
months of the UK Border Agency sending a substantive reply to your original request and
should be addressed to:
Information Access Team
Home Office
Ground Floor, Seacole Building
2 Marsham Street
London
SW1 P 4DF

During the independent review the department's handling of your information request will be
reassessed by staff who were not involved in providing you with this response. Should you
remain dissatisfied after this internal review, you will have a right of complaint to the
Information Commissioner as established by section 50 of the Freedom of Information Act.

Yours sincerely,

Ross Lewington
Regional Directors Office

seems to have been written by a human being rather than a bot!
still seems like there is scope for some concerted action if anyone is still up for it?

sufi
07-03-2011, 04:45 PM
the new ukba guidance they refer to is available here if anyone's interested
http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/policyandlaw/asylumpolicyinstructions/apis/sexual-orientation-gender-ident?view=Binary

sufi
07-04-2011, 11:39 AM
Major development on LGBT asylum protections at the European Parliament

Members of the European Parliament voted today to "modernise" the EU-wide system for examining asylum claims and "bring more fairness for LGBT asylum-seekers". Among the measures it adopted, the definition of groups of asylum-seekers 'with special needs' was updated to include people fleeing persecution based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

The Parliament voted in favour of a series of amendments contained in a report drafted by French centre-left MEP Sylvie Guillaume (S and D, Socialists and Democrats) that guarantee that lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people seeking asylum in the EU would receive particular attention.

The measures include:

* providing expert advice to asylum officials on sexual orientation and gender identity;

* protecting claimants' privacy;

* guaranteeing that physical examinations fully respect human dignity and integrity, for instance in cases involving minors or transgender people; and

* ensuring that applications by LGBT asylum-seekers are not 'fast-tracked' for removal to their country of origin.

http://madikazemi.blogspot.com/2011/04/major-development-on-lgbt-asylum.html
--

baboon2004
07-04-2011, 02:52 PM
Good stuff, but god knows how UKBA will 'interpret' all this.

sufi
11-05-2011, 07:20 PM
Gay asylum claims not being counted despite pledge, admit ministers
Lack of data means Home Office unclear whether applicants are still being deported to countries where they risk persecution

Karen McVeigh
guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/may/01/gay-asylum-claims-not-being-counted), Sunday 1 May 2011 20.02 BST

Ministers have admitted they are failing to collect data on the number of people who claim or are refused asylum on the basis of their sexuality, despite a government promise not to deport lesbians and gay men at risk of persecution.

The lack of statistics means the government does not know whether gay and lesbian asylum seekers are still being deported to countries where they may face imprisonment, torture or execution. It is also unable to say whether new rules, brought in after a supreme court ruling that marked an end to Britain refusing asylum to gay men and lesbians on the grounds they could hide their sexuality by living discreetly, are being breached.

In that July ruling, welcomed by Theresa May, the home secretary, one judge described how homophobia had "dramatically worsened" in countries such as Uganda, Malawi and Iran, making it necessary to allow those at risk protection in Britain.

The UK Border Agency was told by the Home Office last year that the new rules should be applied "with immediate effect" and that relevant cases should be "flagged and recorded".

But more than six months on, the government still does not know how many cases they are dealing with, let alone whether the ruling is being followed.

Last week, the US secretary of state, Hilary Clinton, launched her department's 35th Human Rights report, which cited a Stonewall report drawing attention to "significant disadvantages" experienced by lesbian and gay asylum seekers in Britain. The UK chapter in the US state department report said: "Stonewall claimed that, by 'fast tracking' these more complex cases and denying them quickly, UKBA staff did not give applicants time to talk openly about their sexual orientation."

The campaign group found that, in the period between 2005-2009 almost all gay and lesbian asylum seeker claims were initially refused, compared with a 76% refusal rate among all asylum seekers, and were more likely to be fast tracked, which meant applicants and their lawyers had much less time to prepare an appeal.

Following accusations of "institutional homophobia", the UKBA has taken steps to address criticisms, including training case workers in dealing with such claims. Lesbian and gay asylum support groups said that the lack of centrally held official figures means they are unable to track whether any progress is being made.

Erin Power of the UK Lesbian and Gay Immigration Group said: "This makes it impossible to say anything at all about LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender] claims because we don't know whether they are granting asylum. An awful lot of work and money has gone into improving the approach to LGBT claims.

"What worries us is people who were refused prior to the supreme court decision. In these cases, we know the countries they are being sent back to are dangerous. If they are picked up as failed asylum seekers, no one is checking whether they were told to be discreet. We've no idea how many people there are."

In what she described as a "worrying" development, following the ruling, it is becoming more difficult for asylum seekers to "prove" to the authorities that they are homosexual.

"It has always been difficult to prove but more frequently now, people are not being believed."

Steve Symonds, the legal officer of Immigration Law Practitioners Association, said: "We are aware of cases where the Home Office and the courts have refused people asylum on the basis which we know now to be wrong.

"The sensible thing to do would be to review cases of removal. When you get to a point where you have to put someone on a plane for removal, you should get their file out and make sure there's nothing of concern. They should check they have not claimed on the grounds of being gay, because they know that there was an important decision in the court which may be relevant."

In at least one immigration case, last month, involving a woman they believed was a lesbian from Uganda, Home Office lawyers argued that there was no persecution of lesbians in there and that she could be safely returned if she lived discreetly. But a judge ruled that living openly as a lesbian would expose her to persecution and granted her leave to remain.

In response to a parliamentary question asking how many lesbian and gay asylum seekers had been granted or refused asylum since July, Damian Green, the immigration minister, said: "The information requested in the questions is not recorded centrally by the UK Border Agency and can only be obtained through examination of individual case records at a disproportionate cost."

A UKBA spokesperson said: "The UK Border Agency does not currently record separate statistics on the grounds on which individuals claim asylum.

"We are, however, reviewing how data on sexual orientation cases can be recorded more effectively and whether any resulting data can be published."
minimal progress so far still :slanted:

highhhness
20-05-2011, 12:47 PM
Thanks sufi for all the correspondence and FOI-ing. It is pretty unrealistic to expect UKBA to keep organised data on anything - I've limited experience of any other central govt depts, but the administrative chaos there is quite something to behold, and must surely rank it as amongst - if not the - worst. It's progress tho that the LGBT guidance exists and they've at least been asked to monitor claims on that basis. Concerted pressure - which is what's now needed - can at least hang off that.

Bit ot, but the below event chimed with the lack of monitoring of reasons for seeking asylum that sufi/grauniad etc turned up. If there isn't any, then it would seem pretty hard to say what the nature of modern asylum-seeking really is. Better said below, in any case:

"The Vanishing Truth of Refugees"
Wednesday, 15 June 2011, 5pm
Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB

Professor Didier Fassin, a leading medical anthropologist, is the James D. Wolfensohn Professor of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study of Princeton, Director of Studies at Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris and President of the French Medical Committee for Exiles.

In this lecture Professor Didier Fassin will explore how, sixty years after the signature of the Geneva Convention, asylum is progressively being emptied of its original signification in Western Europe and North America. First, the increasing assimilation of asylum and immigration serves as a justification for the suspicion towards refugees, the paradox being that it is in the name of an idealized view of asylum that refugees are denied its protection. As their testimony is systematically disqualified, more documents, medical certificates, psychological evidence, and material proof are required, thus confirming the delegitimization of their voice. Second, the progressive recognition of intimate violence, including sexual orientation and genital mutilations, as rationales for asylum obscures the dramatic discrediting of traditional political persecution, systematically contested by protection officers and judges.

This shift from the public to the private spheres is all the more effective in that it is presented as opposing a self-valourizing enlightened vision of the world to the depreciated archaic prejudices against homosexuals and girls. Based on a decade of empirical research on asylum, mostly in France, the lecture will discuss and confront the abstract truth of asylum and the concrete truth of refugees, thus questioning the ethical foundations of contemporary societies.

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/the-vanishing-truth-of-refugees

sufi
21-07-2011, 03:55 PM
apparently some progress on exactly this issue

http://madikazemi.blogspot.com/2011/07/breakthrough-uk-to-record-sexuality.html


UKBA has made no official announcement but we understand that retiring manager Bill Brandon (Deputy Director, NAM+ Quality and Learning; Refugee Integration and Resettlement) told a event organised by the law firm Mischon de Reja last month about the developments on data and auditing.

UK Lesbian and Gay Immigration Group (UKLGIG) Group Manager Erin Power said:

"I don't know why UKBA didn't say publicly that they were trying to find an accurate way to do this."
LibDem peer Lord Avebury has pressed the Home Office on the issue of recording data and auditing.

UKLGIG, which works with LGBT asylum seekers, have been lobbying on the issue for some time and in the last 12 months has held discussions with the Home Office on several occasions.


i fwded this thread to ukglig some time back...

sufi
06-03-2012, 12:50 PM
OK folks
(with apologies for Xposting!)

i'm hyping this national (UK) campaign on it's last week to reach 10,000 signatures:

http://www.refugeecouncil.org.uk/Resources/Refugee%20Council/Campaigns/Proudtoprotectrefugees200.gif (http://e-activist.com/ea-campaign/clientcampaign.do?ea.client.id=121&ea.campaign.id=9202)

http://www.refugeecouncil.org.uk/protect

assuming you agree that it's important for
"the UK government to ensure that our asylum system is fair, humane and effective, enabling refugees to find a safe haven and a new home here."

If you haven't signed yet, please do!
and if you signed already, pass it on to everyone you know!

sufi
03-09-2012, 03:50 PM
Please help me Sign the attached Petition to stop me from being deported to Uganda to Face Torture and Death.

Please help me to get justice - I am facing deportation to Uganda on 3 September-15:00 hrs, Flight MS778 / MS837 by the UKBA.
This petition has been launched by Movement for Justice. Link: http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/freedom-and-asylum-now-for-eddie-mubiru-petition.html

Help to stamp out homophobia now! because Enough is Enough!

The UKBA has subjected me to mental and emotional torture. It refuses to accept that I am gay, despite all the evidences I have provided.

Please sign my petition and help me spread the word........ Asylum Now for Eddie Mubiru- Freedom Now!


Kind regards
Eddie Mubiru
IRC BROOK HOUSE
Perimeter Road, Gatwick Airport, Gatwick,
West Sussex RH6 0PQ.
Mob: 0744 876 7189 do it now

Sectionfive
03-09-2012, 06:23 PM
Interview here might be of interest

http://rabble.ie/2012/08/20/gay-rights-gimme-shelter-an-interview-with-an-asylum-seeker/

sufi
12-10-2012, 04:55 PM
Still no actual progress on this issue from the UK government - this petition (following a deportation on wednesday) is for the Home Sec to sort it out....http://www.allout.org/en/actions/asylum_in_the_uk


UK Home Secretary, Theresa May

Asylum seekers who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender are vulnerable to discrimination from judges who may believe stereotypes about what it means to be gay.

Please immediately issue guidelines on how to fairly adjudicate LGBT asylum cases. Fulfill your promise now.

http://www.allout.org/en/actions/asylum_in_the_uk

Patrick Swayze
14-10-2012, 03:22 PM
https://s3.amazonaws.com/allout-production/petitions/images/000/000/122/theresa%20may_large.jpeg

Theresa May did nothing while a gay man was deported to Nigeria where it's illegal to be gay. (Photograph: David Levene)



lol the caption

sufi
05-11-2012, 11:15 AM
http://www.pinknews.co.uk/2012/11/01/peter-tatchell-uk-government-broke-promise-is-still-deporting-gay-asylum-seekers/
(as well as the promise not to detail any more children)

dd528
06-11-2012, 04:43 PM
"Internal validity over objective reality? The system wants you to lie? What madness is this?"

Say you're a gay male asylum seeker. "Back in Brasil they beat me mercilessly, police have gang raped me. I'm told that I can find acceptance in "Southern Carolina." (Shhh, don't tell him. This will be hilarious.)

Your documents are all ready. Your day before the immigration judge comes. How should you dress? Think about this.

http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2011/08/the_nature_of_the_grift.html

American, but relevant.

Mr. Tea
11-01-2013, 04:28 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2013/jan/11/prove-youre-gay-or-go-home-home-office-tells-senegalese-student

Seriously, wtf? We're taking tips from the Turkish army now?

sufi
13-03-2013, 05:59 PM
(not from me this time)
http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/proof_of_homosexuality#incoming-367743
awaiting (coherent) response

sufi
13-03-2013, 06:09 PM
UK Border Agency - GUILTY of the Murder of Jackie Nanyonjo

Put the UKBA on Trial...

Jail the UKBA's killer thugs!

Theresa May Must Go!

DEMONSTRATION & SPEAK OUT

@ THE HOME OFFICE HQ - 12.30pm
Thursday 14th March

Home Office
HQ, Marsham st, Westminster SW1P

on corner of
Horseferry rd. Westminster or Victoria tube.
Buses: 88, 507, 148 & walk down Great Smith St
to Marsham st

(To meet and walk there together meet at 12noon sharp by Big Ben)

Jackie Nanyonjo died in Uganda last Friday as a result of the injuries inflicted
by the Home Office's licenced thugs who deported her
from Britain on 10th January. Jackie was a fighter for
herself and for others: a lesbian who escaped from
anti-gay persecution and a brutal forced marriage, and a
member of the Movement for Justice. In Britain she had
been able for the first time to live and love openly as
a lesbian; she was much-loved by a wide circle of
friends who kept in touch with her after she was
deported and who miss her deeply. All of us who knew
her, or who didn't know her personally but are
determined to end the regime of racism and
anti-immigrant bigotry that is responsible for her
death, will fight to win justice for Jackie.

Jackie had been through the mental
torture of the immigration and asylum system, with its
arbitrary, subjective decisions and impossible demands
to 'prove that you are a lesbian'. UK Border Agency and
an Asylum Tribunal had dismissed out-of-hand the ample
evidence of friends and her partner that Jackie was a
lesbian and rejected her claim for asylum. She was sent
to the further mental torture of Yarl's Wood women's
detention centre in November 2012 - a few weeks after
detainees had shaken the power of the UKBA in an
uprising of mass protest against brutality and injustice
led by the Yarl's Wood Movement for Justice group and
Jackie had been part of a solidarity demonstration at
the UKBA headquarters in Croydon. Jackie continued her
fight in Yarl's Wood. When the UKBA tried to deport her
in December Jackie resisted bravely despite the
brutality she suffered at the hands of the 'escorts'
provided by the contractor, Reliance. She forced them to
abandon the attempt and when she got back to Yarl's Wood
she lodged a complaint to the UKBA - a complaint the
UKBA rejected.

With all the limited avenues of
Britain's racist immigration laws closed to her and
facing deportation to a country where it is a crime to
be gay and where the political and religious leaders
have whipped up a murderous anti-gay witch-hunt,
Jackie's only option was physical resistance. On 10th
January, on Qatar Airways Flight QR76, Jackie fought
bravely for her freedom with all the strength she could
gather against four Reliance guards. She continued
fighting when the guards drew curtains round their end
of the plane to hide their crimes. She struggled for as
long as she could until, beaten up, half strangled and
bent double, she was overcome by the pain in her chest
and neck and was unable to breathe.

When Jackie arrived at Entebbe
Airport the 'escort' party handed her over to the
Ugandan authorities, who held her for many more hours
without any medical attention. When family members
finally met her, long after the flight had landed,
Jackie was in terrible pain and vomiting blood; they
rushed her to a clinic, but in a country with widespread
poverty and limited medical facilities they were unable
to get the medical attention Jackie needed. Since Jackie
was in hiding as a known lesbian, protected by
relatives, every trip to a doctor or hospital involved a
risk to her life and to the safety of her family. They
were condemned to watch the agonising decline of
Jackie's health and strength over the next two months.

The Home Office and the UKBA are guilty of Jackie's murder. They have
licenced the brutality that Jackie suffered, even if
they pretend 'to look the other way'; they protect the
thugs and the security companies if an asylum seekers'
death or injury becomes public knowledge. Their policies
and decisions are responsible for Jackie's death. The
guards who brutalised Jackie should be in jail and
Reliance should be condemned as an accessory to murder,
along with Qatar Airways and the repressive Qatari
Government that is so willing to do Britain's dirty work
- but the real guilt lies with the politicians and
bureaucrats who run the Home Office and the UKBA, and
ultimately with the Coalition Government. Jackie
Nanyonjo was a victim of the immigrant bashing policies
of Theresa May, the racist Home Secretary.

The Movement for Justice is putting the UKBA on trial for Jackie's murder.
Jackie is by not the first person to die
at the hands or through the actions of the UKBA but we
want to make sure that she is the last. Justice
for Jackie means above all exposing the UKBA before the
Court of Public Opinion, challenging its power so that
what happened to Jackie never happens to anyone else,
and shutting down Yarl's Wood detention centre. It means
building the movement that Jackie joined, in Yarl's Wood
and other detention centres and outside, in our
communities and on our campuses, and end the injustice
of detention and deportation. Join us this
Thursday at the demonstration and speak-out at the Home
Office on Marsham Street, London SW1.