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View Full Version : Are you feeling the recession (yet)?



sufi
15-07-2010, 10:06 PM
i did a training day where 3/7 people were re-training after redundancy, but apart from that not really, personally. (In fact the training was for a new job i got, so i am actually contributing to national joblessness by moonlighting... sorry about that)

i assume this is because the finance crisis has so far only affected amounts of money with wild lines of zeroes after them, that are abstract apart from to a few bankers and politicians, and that us peasants will feel it when the state passes on the pain by unnecessarily chopping our public services & so on in order to 'structurally re-adjust' the loss off of the fat cats who created it & onto the peeple...

am i right? are you feeeling it???

http://www.insearchoftheperfectinvestment.com/images/Weimarinflation.jpg

Brother Randy Hickey
16-07-2010, 12:08 AM
fuck yeh, for my sins I worked in market research and I got made redundant (along with dozens of others) in Feb 09. Whilst in hospital waiting to see if they'd amputate my leg or not :(

MR is one of the first "industries" (ahem) to go under at times like this, when companies realise that they have no spare cash for such pointless, unscientific toss.

And now I'm moving to the north east mid-recession, an area Cameron is going to bang the granny out of, cuts-wise, because nobody votes Tory up there anyway. Smart move, Randy

luka
16-07-2010, 07:12 AM
no becasue australia isnt in recession.

john eden
16-07-2010, 12:43 PM
My partner is freelance and has had all of her work for the summer ditched because the funding has been withdrawn.

My work is partly dependent on public sector stuff, so that is looking a bit shaky also - but the worst is yet to come.

So yes.

paolo
16-07-2010, 01:16 PM
Not yet

I work for the civil service though...

jenks
16-07-2010, 01:24 PM
Indirectly.

Staff not being replaced meaning covering the same number of kids with fewer teachers, i.e. increase in workload.

Staff being made redundant from nearby sixth form college as 'small depts' are forced to close - no Spanish, French or German being offered at A level there next year.

New, promised, buildings being scrapped.

IdleRich
16-07-2010, 01:35 PM
Left Borders 'cause I could see it was going down the tubes thanks to the recession (and being a shit company run by morons - oh, and 'casue of Amazon and Tesco I guess). Sure enough it did of course - since then I've only worked for three weeks - oh and a few days doing temporary market research (counting people walking along the street - thank God for that maths degree) strangely enough.

IdleRich
16-07-2010, 01:37 PM
So yes in other words. VAT rise also makes an immediate difference and that's 'cause of the recession..

droid
16-07-2010, 01:47 PM
Yeah. The whole country is fucked. 30% decrease in income in my house through pay cuts alone.

4linehaiku
16-07-2010, 02:00 PM
I've just graduated and nobody's given me a job yet. Not sure the recession is entirely to blame though. We'll see how it goes.

Dr Awesome
16-07-2010, 02:07 PM
The recession didn't really hit my line of work that badly (praise Allah). I was semi-deliberately unemployed for the first bit of this year, and was planning on travelling over-seas, however events conspired and not going now means I've saved up a bit more of a nest egg which is pleasant. I also had the option of going back to study more if I couldn't find work.
Consumer confidence seems pretty high round these parts again now too, the business I interact with seem to be hiring staff and buying things.
Gotta hand it to my mother though, working for the Catholics she's in the most recession-proof fortress imaginable.

Sectionfive
16-07-2010, 02:13 PM
Deficit almost 20%, the highest in the developed world
Food and drink, electricity prices nearly the highest in EU.
Untold amount of young family's in serious negative equity and mortgage arrears.

And thats only today's news.....

On a personal level, most of my close friends have left the country.
The college grant I was supposed to get in September is gone in the last budget.
Half of the family are out of work for the first time in their lives.

We are shagged beyond believe for years to come, this is only the thin end.

Dr Awesome
16-07-2010, 02:18 PM
On a personal level, most of my close friends have left the country.
The college grant I was supposed to get in September is gone in the last budget.
Half of the family are out of work for the first time in their lives.

We are shagged beyond believe for years to come, this is only the thin end.

I don't know what your situation is, but have you looked at getting out too?

Sectionfive
16-07-2010, 02:23 PM
No point in leaving till I have some sort of degree/qualification.
Its going to be case of go and stay gone. So I want to have the best chance etc.

crackerjack
16-07-2010, 02:25 PM
Most of my friends (and I) work in music and media so this recession is old news, people. We were way ahead of the curve:(.

That said the last 6 months have been great, relative to the last 2/3 years at least. But that's just about to dry up again.

Sick Boy
16-07-2010, 02:41 PM
Other than the transit system in Toronto reaching near-extortionate fees (which has more to do with their greedy, overpaid unions) and the inflation caused by the newly implemented harmonized sales tax, I haven't really noticed many notably harsh effects of the recession. My jobs have remained keeping the tenuous lack of stability they've always had, and have been roughly as easy to land as they always have been. That being said, perhaps it would effect me more if I ever had real jobs, or if I didn't live in Canada.

I did read this week that tenured positions in Universities have been dramatically decreasing, a trend bringing with it all kinds of negative implications...

nomos
16-07-2010, 03:00 PM
I did read this week that tenured positions in Universities have been dramatically decreasing, a trend bringing with it all kinds of negative implications...
Me: lingering in a PhD program = no money. But, finishing = poor prospects for work. Fewer jobs available = increased competition for postdocs. The long-predicted wave of retirements isn't happening because everyone's pensions tanked in the crash. They're either staying on or not being replaced. Lots of new, stimulus-funded buildings on campus though. No idea how they'll hire enough people to teach in them unless they go the rumoured route of bypassing tenure and outsourcing to a low-paying academic temp agency/IP pirate, which would/should = bitter labour struggles. Somehow they've managed to find the cash to put flat screens in every other hall and foyer.

nomos
16-07-2010, 03:15 PM
That said, Canada has weathered this better than most. But, by the time the crash came, our Tory minority had already killed off the surplus that we suffered for in the mid-90s. Now we've got a big new deficit and these guys are itching to roll out the austerity measures as soon as they can win a majority.

Kate Mossad
16-07-2010, 06:46 PM
I'm alright (Jack) but a noticeable number of people higher up the food-chain than me have left to "pursue freelance opportunities" :slanted:

Sick Boy
16-07-2010, 07:22 PM
Me: lingering in a PhD program = no money.

I can't really believe I haven't asked this yet, but: what are you pursuing a PhD in?

Leo
16-07-2010, 07:25 PM
yup. i'm self-employed, actually gained an additional client last year and did better than ever before, but this year's monthly take is down about 40% compared to 2009. luckily, the misses is working again (took 18 months off to work on her phd, which is still in progress), so it's balancing out.

nomos
16-07-2010, 07:35 PM
I can't really believe I haven't asked this yet, but: what are you pursuing a PhD in?
It's an interdisc arts program and my work straddles music and sound studies

Sick Boy
16-07-2010, 08:20 PM
It's an interdisc arts program and my work straddles music and sound studies

How very appropriate. :)
I hope that you let us all know when the work is done.

Mr. Tea
20-07-2010, 10:21 AM
I think if I had to choose one image as a symbol of the recession in this country, it'd be a boarded-up pub. A handful have shut over the last year or two within a short walk of my house. If the govt are going to bring in this measure to stop sales of super-cheap off-licence booze, it's only fair there should be some kind of tax break for on-licence sales.

Apart from that, it's the usual tale of mates who are out of work, or stuck in jobs they're woefully overqualified for - and the better-part-of-a-year in which I was un(der)employed before I got a full-time job last year.

cobretti
20-07-2010, 12:35 PM
If the govt are going to bring in this measure to stop sales of super-cheap off-licence booze, it's only fair there should be some kind of tax break for on-licence sales.

The last thing they're going to do is give pubs any reason to make booze cheaper, as (IMO) the picture they paint of the binge drinking culture/problem is that of people spilling out of pubs at closing time and causing mayhem on the streets, something quite apart from the ASBO crew drinking down a lane or whatever (which really should be solvable with smart community policing). It'd be nice to think that tax breaks would mean pubs keeping the same prices but taking home more money, but it'd inevitably lead to further price cuts being such a competitive business.

-------

As the manager of a small business (one of two shops when I took on the job three years ago aged 19, we're now two and a half shops, if that makes any sense), the recession has made life very difficult. Two shop moves in a year due to both the recession and changes in shopping habits in Glasgow, being paid late for many months, having problems with suppliers due to cash flow problems (particularly Nike and Adidas, who despite their marketing are only in the skateboard footwear business for the money, surprise surprise), it's been very very hard as we're right at the bottom of the trickle down effect the credit crunch and subsequent recession has had on people's income. The fact of the matter is that the recession has affected pretty much everyone, and even if people are still on the same salary/wage, taking home the same pay packet at the end of the month, the constant fearmongering in the media has made people a lot more careful with their money. Unfortunately that affects shops such as ourselves more than anyone on the high street, because we can't offset one store's losses with the profits of 10 others. If both shops have a shit month, it gets very stressful very quickly.

That said, we are through the worst of it and I'm glad to have been a part of pulling us through. I've worked hard over the last 3 years to bring the Glasgow shop from a real shit position to being the main earner for the company, and it has been a valuable learning experience that'll prove useful in whatever I go on to do after I'm finished with this job. Hopefully with the launch of a new website later this year, that'll help to keep money coming in even when the shops are having a shit time of it, and make life a bit easier for everyone in the company.

Mr. Tea
20-07-2010, 01:04 PM
The last thing they're going to do is give pubs any reason to make booze cheaper, as (IMO) the picture they paint of the binge drinking culture/problem is that of people spilling out of pubs at closing time and causing mayhem on the streets, something quite apart from the ASBO crew drinking down a lane or whatever (which really should be solvable with smart community policing). It'd be nice to think that tax breaks would mean pubs keeping the same prices but taking home more money, but it'd inevitably lead to further price cuts being such a competitive business.

I hear you - when I said it would be "only fair", I didn't mean I thought it was particularly likely. What I'd be perfectly happy with is an end to stupid drinks promotions and Happy Hour bollocks - which I think is the main driver behind crowds of rowdy pissheads flooding the streets at 11.30 every weekend, and all the aggro and puke that goes with it - and a modest but across-the-board drop in the price of a pint or glass of wine. I think this would help save proper pubs from closing down while reducing the most severe binge drinking.

Good to hear your business is riding out the recession! Best of luck and all that, I've got massive respect for anyone who can take on something like that and make a go of it, I'm sure I wouldn't have a clue.

Sectionfive
20-07-2010, 01:43 PM
Wait a minute ! Ye actually have pubs that lower prices ?

Mr. Tea
20-07-2010, 01:51 PM
Wait a minute ! Ye actually have pubs that lower prices ?

I'm saying such a thing could happen, if there were a drop in the tax on on-licence sales. Note the 'could' and 'if'.

But you're in Ireland, and I've heard stories about pub prices there that have chilled me to the marrow. :eek:

Sick Boy
20-07-2010, 04:43 PM
Have drink prices changed in England then? Last I was there it was pretty much a standard 3 quid a pint, if I remember correctly. At what I was getting paid during that time (9 pound an hour) versus comparable wages in Toronto that actually worked out to being cheaper. Pints here are about $7 plus tip.

Mr. Tea
20-07-2010, 05:26 PM
Well naturally it varies according to location and type of bar, but yeah, 3 is pretty much standard not just in London but across the entire South. Significantly cheaper in the rest of the country. It creeps up a few pence with every budget because of course it's acceptable to tax alcohol massively on the back of 'binge-drinking Britain' rhetoric (not that a lot of people in this country don't drink far too much far too often).

My main beef with the ever-increasing level of booze duty is that it's a blunt instrument. When people are causing fights and killing their livers en masse, chances are they aren't doing it with regular-price pints and glasses of wine because these are already prohibitively expensive for many people to actually get proper drunk on; it's people necking a few cans of cheap supermarket beer and then hitting the bars that have cheap shots, pitchers and bottles on promotion. Meanwhile ordinary locals are shutting down because they can't compete on price. If limitations on cheap drink promotions were brought in, along with a small reduction in the overall duty, you'd see less hardcore problem drinking while helping pubs stay in business. (I reckon.)

Sick Boy
20-07-2010, 07:32 PM
My main beef with the ever-increasing level of booze duty is that it's a blunt instrument. When people are causing fights and killing their livers en masse, chances are they aren't doing it with regular-price pints and glasses of wine because these are already prohibitively expensive for many people to actually get proper drunk on; it's people necking a few cans of cheap supermarket beer and then hitting the bars that have cheap shots, pitchers and bottles on promotion. Meanwhile ordinary locals are shutting down because they can't compete on price. If limitations on cheap drink promotions were brought in, along with a small reduction in the overall duty, you'd see less hardcore problem drinking while helping pubs stay in business. (I reckon.)

Completely agree with this. This definitely happens in North America too: the legal sale of alcohol is such a political quandry that all policies surrounding it seem to be informed by a paradoxical notion that selling booze equals good, but drinking it equals bad. Which is why all the laws and by-laws surrounding last calls, bartender etiquette, legal volumes, open containers, and on- and off-licence categorizations seem like such an arbitrary and incongruous mess.

That and "BINGE DRINKING BRITAIN" makes a much better headline.

Sick Boy
20-07-2010, 07:40 PM
Take this for example. The Ontario Liquor Board just recently decided to stop selling Dan Akroyd's vodka in their liquor stores, caving into public pressure that it should be removed because its skull-shaped bottle was encouraging teenage binge-drinking and glamourizing alcoholism.

This, of course, not taking into consideration that teenagers aren't actually legally supposed to be buying anything from liquor stores in the first place, and that if liquor stores really wanted to prevent binge-drinking they would ban 3L bottles of Smirnoff* instead of an $80 bottle of top shelf vodka with a "cool" bottle design.

*These 3L bottles are referred to in Canada as "Texas Mickeys", a riff on the 375ml "mickeys" which contain an amount of alcohol reasonable for an evening's personal use. So the term itself is a tongue-in-cheek joke about binge-drinking. Poor Dan Akroyd.

Slothrop
20-07-2010, 08:19 PM
Take this for example. The Ontario Liquor Board just recently decided to stop selling Dan Akroyd's vodka in their liquor stores, caving into public pressure that it should be removed because its skull-shaped bottle was encouraging teenage binge-drinking and glamourizing alcoholism.

This, of course, not taking into consideration that teenagers aren't actually legally supposed to be buying anything from liquor stores in the first place, and that if liquor stores really wanted to prevent binge-drinking they would ban 3L bottles of Smirnoff* instead of an $80 bottle of top shelf vodka with a "cool" bottle design.
Yeah, look up Brewdog's ongoing skirmishes with the Portman Group for almost exactly the same story.

mistersloane
20-07-2010, 11:31 PM
(I'm sure there was a thread that discussed this but can't find it)

I heard from a bloke down my local that the reason the pubs are shutting is that breweries are putting up prices to sell beer to landlords prohibitely prohibitivly urgh making it expensive and forcing the landlords out, in order to sell the property off to developers. This guy was a landlord himself, he was also really pissed and on alot of coke but I thought it was interesting.

I'd like to think that stopping happy hours etc would stop people getting hideously drunk, but in my heart of hearts I don't think it will, I think we just have to face up to the fact that the UK in general just totally love getting utterly, completely incapably cunted and always have and always will. I'd love to see a book on that.

Sectionfive
20-07-2010, 11:59 PM
Its an funny system ye have over there with the breweries. Id tend to believe what that landlord was saying, especially over the last few years .

Re happy hour, It doesn't make a blind bit of difference. Its been banned here forever and the rest of that paragraph still applies here too, maybe even more so. Has the 24 license affect peoples habits at all ? I take it, ye didn't turn into the continent over night but have people started going out later, taking their time or pacing themselves over the night.

Its the biggest problem here. Only a few hours to go out every weekend, people down everything as fast as they can. Then everyone gets chucked out on the street at the same time with only so many taxis/chippers to go around = chaos.
And like Sickboy said " binge-drinking " looks alot better then " Many avoid town centre and go home minding there own business "

john eden
11-01-2011, 11:51 AM
A few more layoffs at work. More people joining the union.

Better half has had to scrape around for more work but it does seem to be coming in.

A bit more skint than usual after xmas.

How is everyone else doing?

matt b
11-01-2011, 12:00 PM
Sixth forms are still waiting for details.

Rumour has it we will face 4% per cent per year cuts in funding per student for the next 3 years.

TES ran a piece last week that enrichment funding (tutorials, non-academic activities) is going to be slashed from about 130 hours/student/year to 30. Not only will that impact on lots of institutions that derive extra funding from enrichment, but will mean that students from the state sector will struggle even more to get onto highly competitive university courses as enrichment activities are stopped.

There is a complete shitstorm brewing nationally in education. The government have no idea what they are doing, they just want to make cuts.

sufi
11-01-2011, 01:06 PM
we're up for 50-60% cuts according to 'our' minister - i.e. the one who sets our budget for our modest corner of the voluntary sector - there's no connection between this figure and any reality of the work we do at all... just lust for cuts to pay for the tory junketing
http://www.schnews.org.uk/images/753-fireworks-lg.jpg
our entire budget is way less than the compensation paid out by his same dept to some of our client group mistreated at the hands of sub-contracted private sector gorillas
union raising merry hell, to little avail

droid
11-01-2011, 01:12 PM
Pretty much fucked. 28% cut in wages in my household due to bullshit government levies. Also Mrs. Droid had to go on a 3 day week.

Come the end of the month we'll be about €200 worse off on top of that due to increased taxes and cuts in child allowance etc...

With interest rates on the way up, incoming water, property and oxygen taxes and possibly more paycuts its going to get progressively worse over the next 5 years.

Id be long gone if we didnt have a mortgage. As it stands I'm just selling stuff, paying off debts and trying to earn any extra cash I can. We basically have no disposable income after food, debts, bills, utilities etc... are paid each month. And Id count us as amongst the lucky.

Meanwhile our scumbag politicians are resigning en masse so they can avail of better pension deals (already worth anywhere from 80k up a year) before conditions change at the next election. :mad:

john eden
11-01-2011, 01:18 PM
well that all sounds pretty shit! Hope we all weather the storm ok.

droid
11-01-2011, 01:42 PM
Yeah. :( The main casualty so far has been spare time unfortunately. Oh - and hope for the future. Thats long gone.

Mr. Tea
11-01-2011, 02:22 PM
Sufi, you work in immigration/asylum, is that right? Beeb news today says 61,000 asylum applicants can't be traced because of backlog/under-resourcing...

Colleagues of mine at HMRC estimate the UK's annual tax gap to be in the region of tens of billions. Obviously, more of this could be retained by the government if the department were better funded. But no, of course it makes far more sense to save a few million a year by slashing HMRC's workforce. :confused:

IdleRich
11-01-2011, 03:09 PM
Pretty fucked here to be honest. Owe money all over, just applying for jobs, not hearing back. Like others scrounging money when I can by dj-ing or whatever. Thank fuck I own the flat... at the moment.

Sectionfive
06-04-2011, 03:11 PM
http://s3.amazonaws.com/infobeautiful2/billion_dollar_gram_2009.png

droid
06-04-2011, 03:23 PM
:confused:

And for those that missed it, the current bailout plan for Irish banks is expected to cost between 100 + 105 billion euro in total.

The Marshall Plan cost between $81 and $100 billion in adjusted figures.

We're spending enough money on the banks to rebuild a continent and still have change left over...

Sectionfive
03-08-2011, 08:58 PM
http://media.economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/original-size/20110730_WOC181.gif

We're all in it together

Sectionfive
02-11-2012, 09:19 PM
Unemployment has stabilised

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/A6ubl36CMAExe5d.png