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Woebot
03-08-2010, 07:11 AM
Just started this.

Sped-red the intro but thoroughly enjoyed the first chapter (details of Vashti's Progress) and now eagerly anticipating the rest of the book which looks like it's going to be nice reflection of Albion as i escape it to camp over northern spain this month (last year read ackroyds london which gave a useful perspective).

Anyone else on this too?

(don't think we have a UK Folk gossip, slander, lies thread......but haven't bothered searching - this deserves its own thread)

Slothrop
03-08-2010, 11:29 AM
Haven't read it, but having had a look I'm going to have to seek it out.

Diggedy Derek
03-08-2010, 01:11 PM
I'm worried lugging it around in a bag will cause me chronic back problems.

Woebot
03-08-2010, 01:23 PM
I'm worried lugging it around in a bag will cause me chronic back problems.

you're just saying that derek

Benny B
03-08-2010, 10:11 PM
I'm ordering this in definitely. I'm hoping for a mystical experience of some sort. I hope he doesn't bang on about Incredible String Band too much though, I can't stand them...

Benny B
03-08-2010, 10:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Vl-gMo1NY0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9gCN9-Jnfg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWeejHJxGjs&feature=related

Benny B
03-08-2010, 10:41 PM
Put your headphones on for this one. Berts on the left, John on the right (I think)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b--_wj1JSeg&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b--_wj1JSeg&feature=related

Benny B
04-08-2010, 02:53 PM
I'm worried lugging it around in a bag will cause me chronic back problems.

Just picked this up today at waterstones. It is pretty hefty! Read the first chapter on Vashti already, that is a great story. Might actually give the incredible string band yet another go (I think this would be my 3rd attempt to like them). I'm not really sure what attracted me to this book as I haven't listened to much folk music at all in the past couple of years apart from the occasional bit of Dylan & John Martyn. It seems very well written so far though.

Woebot
04-08-2010, 06:05 PM
Just picked this up today at waterstones. It is pretty hefty! Read the first chapter on Vashti already, that is a great story. Might actually give the incredible string band yet another go (I think this would be my 3rd attempt to like them). I'm not really sure what attracted me to this book as I haven't listened to much folk music at all in the past couple of years apart from the occasional bit of Dylan & John Martyn. It seems very well written so far though.

yeah the incredible string band are certainly good for the 5000 layers and hangmans. i swell with pride at recalling that the ISB sleeve in the book is my very own (topical innit!)

Benny B
04-08-2010, 09:36 PM
Cool...You had a listen to this yet? Interesting conversation and some nice music played too. http://exoticpylon.com/pages/2010/07-31-10.html

Taking William Morris as a starting point for looking at the folk revivals of the 20th century is a very original and effective approach I think.

Slothrop
14-08-2010, 05:01 PM
About half to two thirds of the way in.

It's very well written and well researched and is probably going to send me off on an amazon shopping spree, but it does seem to be a great deal of information from which I'm having trouble getting any particularly interesting or unexpected Big Ideas...

It doesn't help that as far as folk music goes I tend to prefer more stripped down traditionalist stuff - not because it's more 'authentic' (which Young sort of insinuates is the only reason for preferring The Copper Family to The Incredible String Band) but because I find it much more musically interesting. And hence I'm not all that interested in the precise circumstances surrounding the recording of each ISB album. Also I've yet to see much interesting criticism of the folk / rock / jazz / psych scene and its goals and assumptions, although maybe that's to come later...

jenks
27-08-2010, 11:36 AM
Reading it at present - first 70 odd pages have me gripped. Like the way he is aware that as Bunyan seeks the back to nature the only uprights on the island are the symbolic arrival of electricity.

Very interested to see how this all pans out - very readable despite its sheer size.

Benny B
27-08-2010, 11:05 PM
Very interested to see how this all pans out - very readable despite its sheer size.

I loved this book and devoured it in about 3 days (I am off work for the summer though). Got me listening
back to Steeleye span and Fairport again after not bothering for years, and the bit on Incredible String Band managed to totally change my mind about them. I used to find them a bit silly but I went back to em
and realised their cosmic properties lol

Rob Young is a great writer

Brother Randy Hickey
22-09-2010, 08:59 PM
i thoroughly enjoyed parts of it - essentially the bits up to the late 60s folk-rock boom and the bits after the death of the folk rock boom. Fascinating, insightful stuff. I didn't think much of the ISB, Fairport, Pentangle, Nick Drake elements because I pretty much can't stand that sort of folk rock anyway. Which might make reading the book at all seem a little perverse since that scene is the core of the whole thing, but I found enough other content to make it a really worthwhile read

jenks
22-09-2010, 09:25 PM
Finished it a while back now. Liked it very much - particularly good at getting me to reappraise bands I thought were a bit naff. Lovely stuff on Mark Hollis at the end. Would have liked more Blakean moments in there perhaps.

I was going to make a spotify playlist and then realised that I didn't need to and instead dragged out all the Lammas Night Laments CDs - also finally got hold of Martyn's Live at Leeds, between this book and the re-energised ambient thread, my listening has been pretty much sorted this past fortnight.

john eden
22-09-2010, 10:31 PM
He was good on exotic pylon. The show should be archived I guess.

See also: http://history-is-made-at-night.blogspot.com/2010/09/electric-eden.html

Brother Randy Hickey
23-09-2010, 06:51 AM
so when are you going to write Electric Young?

john eden
23-09-2010, 11:38 AM
so when are you going to write Electric Young?

from the q-tips to 'wherever i lay my hat' and beyond, this lavishly illustrated book gets to grips with the enigma that is paul young.

Slothrop
23-09-2010, 12:10 PM
i thoroughly enjoyed parts of it - essentially the bits up to the late 60s folk-rock boom and the bits after the death of the folk rock boom. Fascinating, insightful stuff. I didn't think much of the ISB, Fairport, Pentangle, Nick Drake elements because I pretty much can't stand that sort of folk rock anyway. Which might make reading the book at all seem a little perverse since that scene is the core of the whole thing, but I found enough other content to make it a really worthwhile read
Yeah, I think those sections were actually objectively a bit less interesting, too - because when he was talking about earlier traditionalists and folk song collectors he had an undercurrent of prodding at the assumptions and conceits that they were working from while still appreciating the work that they did. Whereas the folk rock bits seemed to take a lot more at face value.

matt b
15-10-2010, 05:52 PM
Well, after having picked this up and then being side-tracked by numerous other things, I have started to make headway into this book and very fine it is too, although the narrative that Mr Young tries to construct strains at times.

But if you quickly pour water (mentally) on the points of highest friction, it gives tonnes of hints and areas to explore.

Best tip so far- Anne Briggs' accompanied output. Only had her a cappella previously. Awesome.

connect_icut
15-10-2010, 07:58 PM
Best tip so far- Anne Briggs' accompanied output. Only had her a cappella previously. Awesome.

Oh yeah! The Time Has Come is great.

craner
16-10-2010, 09:09 AM
Why did this guy write so much about boring folk music? Why didn't he write about yacht disco?

connect_icut
18-04-2011, 02:28 AM
Finally got around to reading this. Even though I already knew quite a lot about many of the artists he writes about, I still found the way he ties it all together pretty mind-blowing.

Obviously, it would be pointless to niggle about personal favourites not getting enough coverage but I was surprised by the fact that he only dedicates three sentences to Roy Harper's Stormcock - particularly given the space he dedicates to discussing the likes of Mr Fox and later-period Steeleye Span.

connect_icut
02-05-2011, 04:20 PM
Aaaaand I just made a fifth volume in my Acid Folk compilation CD series, specifically influenced by Electric Eden:

http://bubblegumcage3.com/2011/05/01/mix-cd-the-acid-folk-vol-5/