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mms
22-03-2005, 08:13 PM
i've promised myself i'm gonna try and get alot of this stuff for a project i want to carry out.
i'm looking for a decent copy of deathline aka raw meat which is only on dvd in the states and was last released on video 9 years ago, anyone have a copy they would like to sell me?

LRJP!
23-03-2005, 01:40 PM
how good a copy do you need? I'm pretty sure i've got a Video i recorded off BBC a few years ago which should be watchable at least - no charge if you want it.

i love that it! One of those great late night TV discoveries.

mms
23-03-2005, 04:52 PM
how good a copy do you need? I'm pretty sure i've got a Video i recorded off BBC a few years ago which should be watchable at least - no charge if you want it.

i love that it! One of those great late night TV discoveries.

that's kind if you dub it.
i don't want to deprive you of it!

LRJP!
24-03-2005, 07:44 PM
dug it out last night and it's as described above, though a little VHSbuzz-y in the quiet bits. Email or PM me your address and i'll beam it down via Royal Mail on Saturday/next week.

craner
08-04-2005, 07:47 PM
Vampire Lovers starring Ingrid Pitt as Carmilla is best British Horror movie of the 1970s.

http://www.baal-peor.gq.nu/fuq/ssv/images/interviews/%5Bactress%5D/ss_ingrid_pitt3.jpg

craner
08-04-2005, 07:51 PM
Which is pretty good considering it came out in 1970.

mms
09-04-2005, 08:12 AM
Vampire Lovers starring Ingrid Pitt as Carmilla is best British Horror movie of the 1970s.

http://www.baal-peor.gq.nu/fuq/ssv/images/interviews/%5Bactress%5D/ss_ingrid_pitt3.jpg
ingrid pitt is lovely, she was in a series of hammer female vampire things.
best british horror is surely wicked man hands down tho
.

michael
11-04-2005, 01:23 PM
Wicked man?

Hear the drummer get wicker?

cortempond
11-04-2005, 05:00 PM
Glad someone has touched upon the genius of '70's British Horror film. Two brilliant gems of that period are Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter (written and directed by Avengers genius Brian Clemens) and The Conqueror Worm, with Vincent Price and Ian Ogilvy. It's amazing that Michael Reeves, who directed Conq. Worm, the She Beast (again with Ogilvy and Barbara Steele) and the Sorcerers (again with Ogilvy! and Boris Karloff) committed suicide, I think at 26. Three cinema masterpieces and dead before 30 -- what a shame, because he had such an incredible perspective on how power forces people to do unspeakable things to others (such as Price's witch obsession and Karloff using Ogilvy as a puppet to feel the sensation of criminal acts). With such a cynical and depressing viewpoint of the corruption and decay that permeates everyday life, it's no wonder he killed himself. Capt. Kronos is a totally different story. Fun, fun fun. The use of Capt. Kronos using a samuari sword in place of your typ. sword in a vampire flick is a genius move.

Speaking of Avengers, just recently saw The Final Programme again, directed by Robert Fuest, who also did the Dr. Phibes films. Being a massive Moorcock and Jerry Cornelius fan, the film is still a massive disappointment, though I still did enjoy some of Fuest's surreal approaches.

I wish someone else who try and make a Jerry Cornelius film, since his character has been ripped off for numerous other films. No, Buckaroo Bonzai does not count as an approp rep.

mms
13-04-2005, 10:25 PM
I've been thinking alot recently about british rural horror, there are a number of films that make great use of the british countryside, traditions, people etc, usually based around the idea of 'not on my land' or native ignorance taken to extremes ie wicker man, straw dogs.

then you've got sorcerers and witchfinder general which make great use of the english countryside as a site of murder and rampage.

then you have new ones like dead man's shoes which look back to a similar trait in 70's us horror, rural revenge films like i spit on your grave, the aesthetics of texas chainsaw and also man with no name westerns to some extent.

anyone else think of any other examples of types ?

i guess there are more examples in US cinema, especially with the idea of murderous godfearing hicks.

Helen
14-04-2005, 02:58 AM
<i>The Shout</i> is a good 70s British horror, being an example of that interesting strand of BH based on a theoretical, invisible phenomenon converting the protagonists themselves from victim to villain, which Terry Nation has thoroughly explored both in Doctor Who and Blakes 7.
<i>Lair of the White Worm</i> - so cheesy, but classic.
70s British horror seems to be particularly grounded in its own sense of place - for instance, with the use of the formula wherein an individual or small group finds themselves one of the last left in their home town as the result of a massive disaster, providing endless opportunities for uncanny/unheimlich imagery a'la <i>I am Legend</i>, <i>The Day of the Triffids</i>, and more recently <i>28 Days Later</i>.

baboon2004
14-04-2005, 07:23 PM
I second 'The Shout' - one of those films that sounds as if it's going to be risible when you read the blurb, but turns out to be genuinely unsettling.

While it may be set in Venice, 'Don't Look Now' is quintissentially British.

Someone mnetioned Dr Phibes - how about Theatre of Blood? Cracking Vincent Price action.

zhao
17-05-2005, 11:35 PM
this might be 80s but there's this out of print, unavailable in the US british movie called "Possession".

oh. my. god.

it's about a woman who cheats on her husband with a multi-tenticled alien monster. I have never seen such powerful acting in my life.

AshRa
18-05-2005, 11:54 AM
I caught the end of a late 70s (by the looks of the clothes) Hammer movie on TV the other night.

Unfortunately I can't remember the channel or the name (I think I was a bit too inebriated to get the pen and paper out!) but it looked sort of like a Tales Of The Unexpected type TV minimovie... I missed the setup but the climax was a bunch of kids having a classic jelly & ice cream birthday party (a bit like the village party scene in Straw Dogs), then getting showered in gallons of blood! Very bizarre and made all the more potent in my memory by just being a truly weird scene out of context...

Does anybody know what i'm on about or did I dream the whole thing up....?

labrat
18-05-2005, 01:12 PM
the thing yuo saw was an episode of Hammer House of Horror; the story was ''The House that Bled to Death''.
the kid's party bit featured a pipe loosening itself from the ceiling(v.slowly) and covering the kids in gouts of gore...Freudians-fire at will!

AshRa
18-05-2005, 01:40 PM
Thanks Labrat! :D

A 13 episode anthology boxset is on Play (http://www.play.com/play247.asp?pa=srmr&page=title&r=R2&title=107444) - I think i'll be treating myself to some ghoulish delights on payday!

nonseq
13-06-2005, 11:56 PM
- Vampire Circus (1972) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067924/) - Not the best, but wins points for its delerial weirdness, making some other Hammer films look 'down to earth'.

- The House That Dripped Blood (1970) (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0065854/) - Very good except segment 'The Cloak'. Segment 'Waxworks' is unique.

- The Devil Rides Out (1968) (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0062885/) - Not 70s but by far the best british horror film that I know of. Genius.

Raw Patrick
26-06-2005, 01:55 AM
I really like the films of Pete Walker. They're often written off as crass and exploitative but they match the tenor of the times very well - the villains are the type of people who think that hangings too good and would back Enoch Powell and Mary Whitehouse all the way. House of Whipcord and Frightmare are very good as is The Comeback which stars charity shop fave Jack Jones as a singer on the comeback trail and as the killer... well, I won't tell you but if you've watched any Brit TV you'll know him from another role.