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don_quixote
18-06-2011, 02:21 PM
worst government minister ever?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/jun/18/michael-gove-exams-gcse-schools


"We now have great headteachers who will become educational entrepreneurs. They will build a brand and create chains."

what. the. fuck.

you
18-06-2011, 04:53 PM
My mum is involved with the union, we had a good chuckle at the letter he sent round to all head's, it was laden with bad and inconsistent grammar.

I may have another gander at Capitalist Realism and come back but I despise the thought of schools as factories churning out products for tomorrow - I feel this is the main sentiment behind a lot of the market stalinism that is in education - or from what I've heard anyhow...


"We now have great headteachers who will become educational entrepreneurs. They will build a brand and create chains."

......and leave a generation branded as products chained to a specific identity....

jenks
18-06-2011, 06:22 PM
I cannot talk rationally about the man - he's pushing through the academy concept come what may which is going to destroy pay and conditions and ultimately lead to a form of privatisation of all state schools.

And that bastard Danny Alexander - yep see how most people would feel being told they will work longer, have no pay rise for three years and have more money taken out at source and quite possibly face redundancies. Strike? You're lucky no-one's burnt your house down you fucktard.

What a shower.

don_quixote
19-06-2011, 06:37 PM
and the age that i can draw my pension is now higher than the life expectancy of a male teacher. fuck you. yet i should be grateful i've received this offer.

crackerjack
20-06-2011, 11:26 AM
This might not work for you, but whenever I see the supercilious goldfish-faced cunt I remind myself that 20 years ago my brother went out with Gove's wife. I find this helps.

Mr. Tea
20-06-2011, 12:54 PM
there [have] been previous attempts to make science relevant, by linking it to contemporary concerns such as climate change or food scares.

Quel horreur! Heaven forfend that science be "relevant!" And describing climate change as a "contemporary issue" makes it sound like something that's all the rage now (among those trendy lefties, at least), but which everyone will have forgotten about in ten years. Which I find a little over-optimistic.

And that line about his daughter not understanding how history is taught - is he implying his daughter attends a state school? Funnily enough I'm not entirely convinced of that. Who said history has to be taught sequentially, anyway? An in-depth knowledge of ancient Egypt is not a prerequisite for understanding the causes of WWII.

I broadly agree with him that the standards of difficulty of the exams need to be looked at if ever-higher numbers of students are getting top grades without universities and employers finding that each year's intake is better educated than the last, but then nearly everyone says this. I don't see how opening state schools up to effective part-privatisation is going to help here.

And if this is an accurate quote:


"What [students] need is a rooting in the basic scientific principles, Newton's laws of thermodynamics and Boyle's law."

he should be suspended from his post until he has satisfactorily completed GCSE Physics. Or perhaps just summarily executed.

don_quixote
20-06-2011, 05:34 PM
i think the guardian comments summed that daughter quote up: "policy by parental anecdote"

the main problem with exam inflation is exams. i'm a teacher. i'm assessed by my students exam performance. they're students. they're assessed by their exam performance. therefore the only thing we are concerned about is their exam performance and not much else.

jenks
21-06-2011, 10:48 AM
Striking next week, Don Q?

don_quixote
21-06-2011, 09:31 PM
i'm NUT so yes. voted for it too. worried about how things will go in the autumn. also we have no NUT rep in our school... how about you?

jenks
22-06-2011, 08:03 PM
Looks like I might be the next rep as ours has just resigned in disgust at the lack of support for the strike in the school.

don_quixote
22-06-2011, 09:05 PM
really?!?! our school is frothing. loads of nasuwt members who wish they could strike too.

don_quixote
22-06-2011, 09:09 PM
maybe i should become nut rep but i've no idea what i'm doing and was put off it by my placement school where the nasuwt rep said never become a union rep. being a union rep himself.

don_quixote
23-06-2011, 07:55 PM
now he's written a letter to headteachers asking them to strikebust.

for fucks sake, this government is asking for a war with teachers.

jenks
24-06-2011, 08:59 AM
We are also in the middle of academy application as well. I feel like like we are living in endtimes here. Erosion of pay, conditions, local authority support, collective bargaining, pensions, job security and on and on.

Morale is low and then stupid bastards say they won't strike cos their kids'll miss lessons - for one day, at the end of June - how shit/arrogant must you be?

ATL proving to be far more united than the NUT here and that is a sad state of affairs

DannyL
24-06-2011, 02:43 PM
Sorry to hear it Jenks. I'm out next week as I'm NUT and our place will be shut.

baboon2004
24-06-2011, 02:52 PM
We are also in the middle of academy application as well. I feel like like we are living in endtimes here. Erosion of pay, conditions, local authority support, collective bargaining, pensions, job security and on and on.

Morale is low and then stupid bastards say they won't strike cos their kids'll miss lessons - for one day, at the end of June - how shit/arrogant must you be?


Those people deserve to be shafted, and no-one will have any sympathy for them when they are, simple as. Appreciate this doesn't make the conditions any easier for you at school :(

jenks
24-06-2011, 03:06 PM
Staffroom is a dark place with those of us striking making it very clear just how short sighted/plain daft the non strikers are being. Our school is planning on staying open - NAS/UWT has made it clear to its members that they shouldn't cover classes but I bet soem of them do.

I don't get the point of being part of a union that you know agrees with striking when you don't agree with it. Join a non-striking union. There's enough out there, unfortunately.

I shall enjoy my day away next Thursday - wife is on strike as well and one of our kid's schools is also closed. Feel sorry for the other son who has to go in!

don_quixote
24-06-2011, 04:55 PM
im completing on buying a house on thursday, was chuffed when the solicitor gave me the date!!

Mr. Tea
24-06-2011, 06:03 PM
I was thinking of becoming a teacher a few years ago when I finished studying - sad to say, I'm glad I didn't now. I hope you guys manage to talk as many wavering colleagues as possible into joining the strike and get lots of press coverage.

Edit: nice one, DQ.

matt b
24-06-2011, 08:52 PM
Our principal is NUT.

and he called Gove 'a wanker' the other day.

I'm Unionless, but won't be crossing picket lines

don_quixote
26-06-2011, 03:40 PM
matt - are you bloody mad? how can you be in a school and unionless? you know they cover you for litigation yes?

gove has sunken to new lows:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/exclusive-gove-urges-parents-into-classrooms-to-break-strike-2302968.html

seriously? SERIOUSLY?

matt b
27-06-2011, 11:00 AM
I'm Sixth Form, not school, but have had to join NUT anyway, for a number of boring reasons.

Gove really is a prime cunt

e/y
27-06-2011, 08:12 PM
http://liberalconspiracy.org/2011/06/27/michael-gove-warns-teachers-but-he-also-went-on-strike/

does the forum have word filters enabled? if so, perhaps 'goldfish-faced cunt' (tm Mr. Tea) would be appropriate for Gove?

Mr. Tea
27-06-2011, 08:34 PM
http://liberalconspiracy.org/2011/06/27/michael-gove-warns-teachers-but-he-also-went-on-strike/

does the forum have word filters enabled? if so, perhaps 'goldfish-faced cunt' (tm Mr. Tea) would be appropriate for Gove?

I'm afraid I can't take credit for that - I was merely paraphrasing crackerjack.

But jesus, talk about getting more right-wing as you get older!

you
27-06-2011, 10:28 PM
Acme Evil Hog (http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/geraldwarner/100049415/michael-goves-potemkin-academies-and-free-schools-are-bogus-evasions-of-real-education-reform/)
Acme Veil Hog (http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2009/may/15/michael-gove-mps-expenses)
Magic He Love (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2006111/Michael-Gove-school-summer-holidays-cut.html)
Male Vice Hog (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-13918723)
Lame Vice Hog (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mps-expenses/5314219/Michael-Gove-to-pay-back-7000-MPs-expenses.html)
goldfish-faced cunt (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1063366/Top-Tory-Michael-Gove-bed-Oxford-romp.html)
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_DskYtYc4h_I/TDTSec59yWI/AAAAAAAABe4/0lFsUblAhjY/s1600/govedm0603_228x326.jpg

Mr. Tea
02-07-2011, 06:42 PM
(very slight) possible silver lining? Reduction in bureaucracy to enable more school trips: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-14000093

jenks
03-07-2011, 09:43 AM
Saw that - I spent all of Friday fine tuning a risk assessment for an overight trip to Stratford as our kids had won a competition and are performing there at the Swan on Tuesday. When I thought it was all complete I was asked, in all seriousness, if I had a risk assessment for walking next to a river. The risk assessment was already over sixty pages long!!!

If this goes through it might actually be the only thing the Tories have ever done to reduce teacher workload.

you
03-07-2011, 08:35 PM
probably shouldn't say this online but.....

where I work the risk assessment is:

"Low"

"Completed upon site, available upon request"

nothing more needed!

Mr. Tea
16-01-2012, 11:01 AM
gove has sunken to new lows:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/exclusive-gove-urges-parents-into-classrooms-to-break-strike-2302968.html


TRUMPED! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16574257

Mr. Tea
05-09-2012, 03:43 AM
Very moving open letter to Michael Gove (http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/politics/2012/09/open-letter-michael-gove-english-teacher-dark-day-education) from an English teacher at a small school in a deprived area with lots of foreign-born pupils:


Dear Michael Gove,

You will never read this, but I feel compelled to put it out there in the faint hope that more people will realise the repercussions of your latest initiative.

I am proud to work at a small school, on a small estate, in the most deprived ward in the county. The life expectancy in this ward is a full 20 years lower than the neighbouring village, which tells you a little bit about our intake. Add to this that within our 530 students, we have 36 different languages spoken and over 40 per cent of students do not count English as their first language.

Effectively, we are everything you hate and everything you would like to abolish. We are the skidmark on the sparkling underpants of your brave new world of academies and free schools. It is no secret that you would like nothing more than to see us swallowed up by a nearby school which features higher in your flawed league tables, but we have worked relentlessly hard to maintain our independence and have done enough, miraculously, to keep our heads above your floor targets for the last couple of years...

Of course the perennial problem of grade inflation remains but anyone who's not a goldfish-faced cunt can surely see that arbitrarily capping the number of candidates who can get a certain grade halfway through the school year and moderating kids' coursework down a whole grade without even telling them before their exams is not really the fairest way to do this.

BTW don't read the comments if you want to avoid shitting yourself with rage.

baboon2004
05-09-2012, 10:30 AM
i didn't realise quite how appallingly this had been done.

So, one thing I don't understand - the colleges are now taking in way less students than they expected, or had they committed to more conditional places than they could ever handle in the first place?

jenks
05-09-2012, 12:26 PM
I have held back from venting yet again about Gove but this disingenuous bastard had the temerity to say his heart went out to all those who sat exams this summer.

He claims to have had no influence on Ofqual and that it would be totally wrong of politicians to interfere with an independent organisation. All utter cant and bullshit. He wants the exams to look discredited so that he can bring in old fashioned exams that people like him were good at at school.

And the classic response is a fudge rather than a budge - nothing wrong with the results but we'll give you a free resit but we won't say how we are going to staff it or pay for the extra resources or just generally get you ready for an exam which you were well and truly ready for in June.

No-one has really addressed the fact that this has only occured in English - next year Maths and Science go from modular to linear, so expect a sudden drop in 'standards' or correction of 'grade inflation' (how quick we are to embrace that term without a full investigation of just how/why kids are getting better grades. Could it have something to do with the amount of time/effort kids and teachers are putting in. Relentless money spent on intervention as we run from fear of triggering an OFSTED inspection?)

A few personal anecdotes - my dept were set the task of gettin 92% of kids A-C grades in English - our highest ever was 78%. We are an all boys comp in a grammar area, so the top 20% has been creamed off already. These targets are set by a nameless/faceless organisation called The Fischer Family Trust and their data is used by OFTSED to set targets and measure schools.

so..We did everything we could and I reasonably expected to get about 80% - based on all the data I had, where grade boundaries were in previous exams, examiners coming in and talking to us etc. We got 70%. Obviously pissed off but the same kids, taught by the same teachers also did an English Literature GCSE - 88% of them got a C or more. Lit is considered to be harder and we usually perform 10% below the Lang.

As has been pointed out kids cannot now go and do apprenticeships, teachers of sixth form are finding classes to be smaller or closed, possibly meaning redundancies or short term contracts not being renewed.

I'll stop - I'm taking two boys up to be part of a national youth theatre ensemble for the RSC and The National Theatre. A reminder of why I still hang on in doing a discredited job.

Mr. Tea
05-09-2012, 05:27 PM
Damn, that's really shitty. Sorry to hear that.

I don't think the 'grade inflation' issue can be dismissed entirely. I mean, this is the first year GCSE results haven't improved since they were introduced, isn't it? It would be fine if that meant each successive year of candidates were genuinely leaving school better-educated than the last, but employers and admissions tutors don't seem to think this is case. It could also be that kids are getting better and better at passing exams (presumably via teachers getting better at preparing them), which isn't the same thing, but if that's the case then it seems natural to argue for tougher exams. Or at least exams that are less easy to pass by rote learning.

Not knocking teachers at all here BTW, and I can only imagine how frustrating it must be to have to teach to such a prescriptive curriculum and then get kicked around by both the govt and the papers...

you
05-09-2012, 11:16 PM
"A few personal anecdotes - my dept were set the task of gettin 92% of kids A-C grades in English - our highest ever was 78%. We are an all boys comp in a grammar area, so the top 20% has been creamed off already. These targets are set by a nameless/faceless organisation called The Fischer Family Trust and their data is used by OFTSED to set targets and measure schools. "

good to see capitalist quantifying put to good logical use here...

jenks
06-09-2012, 11:24 PM
good to see capitalist quantifying put to good logical use here...

i'm not really sure what you mean?

the fact that schools are set targets?
the fact that stats are part of the standard language of teachers?
the fact that targets are meaningless? Or are meaningless outside of context?

Not only teachers but many other areas are aware of a set of linguistic expectations, to use a certain set of words, to mould their own discipline to a series of interchangeable abstract nouns. This doesn't mean we cannot see behind the bullshit, instead we are forced to play their game based on targets etc If we do not then we do not get to do the job we want to do.

I am surre there are others on here who work for public services and feel the heavy hand of government equally, or even more, acutely.

jenks
06-09-2012, 11:47 PM
Damn, that's really shitty. Sorry to hear that.

I don't think the 'grade inflation' issue can be dismissed entirely. .

T - i do not disagree that results have gone up but am a bit concerned at the willing acceptance of the terminology of 'grade inflation' in a contextless account - a discussion the current government do not want.

why have grades gone up? Well partly because there is a constant pressure to make sure every kid that can will get a C. So, where in the past kids might get a bit of extra homework they are now having to come in during the Easter holidays or forego PE so that they can cram for exams. Also in the coursework kids just went in with what they could get, now it is endless redrafts to get them up to scratch. There are many more examples of 'intervention' but I am aware that I am going on a bit about something I know something about but which gets misrepresented in the media so ridiculously.

Why are teachers doing this? Especially when they are contributing to 'grade inflation'? Cos they too are under pressure to get results which show the school heading up league tables, to stop OFSTED arriving, to keep senior managers off their backs, because the kids have been they are going to get these gardes by the predicted grade algorithm in the FFT data base.

If there was an acceptance by the government that the targets were unrealistic and generated by unrealistic data then we wouldn't be squeezed to magic up marvellous results.Or work ourselves to the point of mental exhaustion, rack up large numbers of sick days and see good colleagues go under and sign off for months on end with stress.

it is unfair and disingenuous of the government bodies (The Fischer Family Trust et al) to set targets which are unachievable. If a kid starts a gCSE and is informed, wrongly, that they can get a C then their whole career choice is based upon specious reasoning and setting them up to fail. They fail to get their college course, they fail to get their qualifications, they enter the world of NEETS through no fault of their own other than believing that they had been given a fair chance. It is all well and good offering opportunities to aspire to but be realistic - there's no good me aspiring to be astronaut at my age and with my fear of heights!

you
07-09-2012, 12:06 AM
i'm not really sure what you mean?

the fact that schools are set targets?
the fact that stats are part of the standard language of teachers?
the fact that targets are meaningless? Or are meaningless outside of context?

Not only teachers but many other areas are aware of a set of linguistic expectations, to use a certain set of words, to mould their own discipline to a series of interchangeable abstract nouns. This doesn't mean we cannot see behind the bullshit, instead we are forced to play their game based on targets etc If we do not then we do not get to do the job we want to do.

I am surre there are others on here who work for public services and feel the heavy hand of government equally, or even more, acutely.

It wasn't an attacking comment, more to highlight the absurdity of targets. Like you say, if you already have the bottom 80% of students, and they are asking you to make 92% of the bottom 80% get A-C.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11074117

So lets be generous and presume that 75% Nat Av will get A*-C. Which leaves your bottom 80% with a remaining chunk outside of A*-C - so 70% would've been a realistic target.

take 100
20 grammar
80 with you
-25 outside A-C
=55 in A*-C
which is about 68.summat%

.....

so if you take your target of 92% presume you have the lower 80% this turns A*-C av across your place and the grammar into 94% based on the 75% target.

Basically that target is wayyyy to high.

Mr. Tea
07-09-2012, 01:53 PM
Thanks jenks, that answer helps a lot.

Just thinking back to when I was working as a tutor a few years ago - I wonder how widespread that was 10 or 20 years ago? And I had some work in a city academy too, so it wasn't all paid for out of parents' pockets.

Funnily enough this is on the beeb news front page today: Children's reading 'pushed out' by other activities (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-19511825) - such as, presumably, endless revision sessions, coursework reviews, exam resits etc...

That's tragic about kids being given unrealistic expectations, it's always much worse to have your hopes falsely built up and then crushed than to be given realistic goals in the first place.

routes
09-09-2012, 09:48 AM
that's very interesting to see it put that like Jenks, thanks.

Tea - that article doesn't mention the huge amount of time young people spend online, when they are online they are reading quite alot of the time. it's not just the endless revision sessions that have replaced reading, though that is certainly true some of the time.. in my (extremely challenging) school (near Peckham, South London) they have been pushing compulsory P4C (Philosophy for Children), which now takes up some of the timetabled hours previously assigned to reading or Religious Education. I am a P4C convert, the impact it has been having at all tiers of the school, both in the classrooms and generally around the school, has been remarkable and extraordinary. i'd go so far as to say that introducing P4C last year has saved the school from a likely intervention over the next couple of years. Gove is an idiot not to see the value of P4C.

Patrick Swayze
10-09-2012, 10:52 AM
Could it have something to do with the amount of time/effort kids and teachers are putting in.

yep we must all be getting better, working harder, knowing more etc

Mr. Tea
20-09-2012, 04:59 PM
yep we must all be getting better, working harder, knowing more etc

Oi! Teacher! Leave them kids alone!

vimothy
20-09-2012, 05:50 PM
Some good comments from Jenks in this thread.

Whenever I think about education and the "audit culture", I'm reminded of two things: one is "ComStat" from The Wire; the other is Goodhart's Law:


Goodhart's law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodhart's_law), although it can be expressed in many ways, states that once a social or economic indicator or other surrogate measure is made a target for the purpose of conducting social or economic policy, then it will lose the information content that would qualify it to play that role. The law was named for its developer, Charles Goodhart, a former advisor to the Bank of England and Emeritus Professor at the London School of Economics.

"Any observed statistical regularity will tend to collapse once pressure is placed upon it for control purposes."

Mr. Tea
20-09-2012, 05:53 PM
Vimothy, where do you get all these cool socio-cultural 'laws' from? You got an encyclopaedia of them or something?

vimothy
20-09-2012, 06:34 PM
I just use the same one over and over again, but no one ever notices.

Mr. Tea
20-09-2012, 06:49 PM
Nah, it's definitely different (although similar in spirit, I suppose) to 'iron law of bureaucracy' you posted once.

IdleRich
24-09-2012, 01:20 PM
The Parkinson's Law book is a good source for that kind of thing I seem to remember.

Mr. Tea
24-09-2012, 02:07 PM
Not really the same kind of thing, but I love Hoffstadter's Law: when undertaking basically any project, "it will always take longer than you think, even if you take into account Hoffstadter's Law".

dd528
24-09-2012, 07:31 PM
This new plan to scrap GCSEs and introduce the EBacc as some kind of replacement seems like one more in a series of ill-thought out policies to emerge on Gove's watch.

In June we find out in the papers (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/michael-gove-plans-to-scrap-gcses-and-bring-back-tougher-olevels-7870253.html) that the government plans to scrap GCSEs and bring back something like O-levels and CSEs. Unfortunately the LibDem members of the government also seem to have found out in the papers, having not been consulted, then proceeded to hurl (accurate) accusations at Gove that he wanted a return to a two-tier system.

Fast forward to September and the EBacc announcement (http://www.education.gov.uk/inthenews/inthenews/a00213908/oral-statement-ks4-exam-reform). Now Clegg and Gove are hand in hand, writing in the Evening Standard (http://www.standard.co.uk/comment/comment/michael-gove-and-nick-clegg-a-new-exam-will-get-the-best-out-of-all-our-children-8144696.html) about how they share a passion for education and believe this new qualification is just what is needed.


Of course there will be some students who will not sit these exams — the same students who do not sit GCSEs today. We will make special provision for these students, and their schools will be required to produce a detailed record of their achievement in each curriculum area to help them make progress subsequently — and we anticipate some will secure EBacc certificates at the age of 17 or 18.

So the policy that has replaced the two-tier suggestion seems to be a one-tier system that some kids just don't get to participate in at all? What employer or further education institution is going to look at a "record of achievement", written by a pupil's own school, and consider it to be worth the paper it's written on?

There is plenty wrong with the current system but it does at least seem that, at the moment, a comprehensive school can offer a fairly wide range of routes by which their pupils can access the curriculum. The division of examination into Foundation and Higher tiers means that time isn't wasted teaching more able kids material that does not challenge them, nor in teaching less able kids material they cannot realistically be expected to engage with or understand.

Coursework means that children who have academic talent, but do not perform well in exams, are still able to demonstrate their ability. More than that, coursework is absolutely necessary preparation for the independent learning and research skills that are so important as part of a student's further and higher education. It beggars belief that Gove can talk about wanting to best prepare kids for the rigours of university, and then wants to scrap coursework from English, foreign languages, and humanities subjects.

Plus, as it stands, GCSEs in a range of supposedly less academic subjects (arts subjects, PE, religious studies, technologies, etc.) are to be binned and replaced with something that the government hasn't found the time to come up with on the back of an envelope yet. So that is yet another dividing line.

The worst of it all is that it seems to have come out of the blue. The policy announcement has come before any consultation, which is the only way it could have happened because no teaching union has had anything positive to say about it. Nor have the devolved administrations in Wales and Northern Ireland, who have had it sprung on them the same as the rest of us. Labour have come out against it, which means if the whole thing is to be brought in, it will have to be rushed through before the end of this parliament.

Then there is the proposed switch from the current system of grading to a normative system, which seems like a fudge to circumvent the need to actually have a sophisticated debate on standards and assessment in schools, even if it would end up being the reasoned outcome of that debate were it ever to take place.

It's frustrating because I think some things of value have been put forward. The idea of one exam board per subject is a good one. A move to writing coursework in supervised conditions in schools rather than at home would go a long way to tackling some of the current problems with that mode of assessment. The modular nature of current GCSEs is also a problem. Not, perhaps, so much because of the fact that it gives students the ability to resit ad infinitum, but because having exams frequently over the course of years 10 and 11 is extremely disruptive to the teaching timetable, and because it necessitates rescheduling (or missing) teaching in one subject to allow for the sitting of an exam in another subject, which has a negative educational impact and increases tension between departments within a school. But it's hard to focus on the good within these policies when so much of the rest is just bollocks. It's policy for policy's sake. And even then it's only half a policy.

Whatever happened to the Tomlinson report? When a long, thorough, bipartisan consultation took place and a fairly broad consensus was achieved, with a raft of commonsense suggestions for addressing problems in the education system? When advances in allowing the maximum possible number of kids to access the curriculum were to be built on? When measures were proposed to deal with other issues based on research and study of what works around the world, rather than by only paying lip service to those things? Obviously too good to be true.

jenks
24-09-2012, 09:06 PM
Lucid observations there. Not much to add except to add that interestingly the recently introduced Controlled Assessment (coursework done under classroom supervision) has been a success - has stopped kids/parents cheating, has stopped the nightmare of trying to chase it up, has stopped kids redrafting ad infinitum to try to get that grade but will be replaced (despite working) because Gove's view is that anything marked by teachers is not rigorous enough. Be interesting what he makes of the wildly varying quality of examination marking then.

Also the idea that some kids won't sit these exams, like now, those numbers are almost non existant - kids all sit at least their GCSE Maths and English unless there are extreme circs but this new EBacc is likely to disenfranchise more kids than the current system. Don't worry we'll give them a pointless scrap of paper that might as well be headed NEET.

I am no fan of Estelle Morris but I heard her speak recently and her point was before changing something have a good look at what the system you are replacing was trying to fix. GCSEs got rid of two tier systems, introduced marks for Speaking and Listening - proper life skills - gave teachers a degree of choice of choice within an established National Curriculum and brought the examination system screaming into the twentieth century. Back to the Future indeed for the EBacc.

Finally, what do we mean by standards? No real hard evidence as to what they might be - people who can spell? People who know which side to place the address when writing a letter? People who don't play their music too loud on the train? It seems to me that 'standards' is somehow about spelling, punctuation and behaviour, as if somehow they are all of a piece. Whilst they remain this nebulous abstract noun the coalition can have a field day slagging off teachers, undermining kids' achievements and prosecuting their continued class war.

baboon2004
25-09-2012, 07:58 PM
Can someone give me an explanation of the alternative exams to GCSEs that academies are reportedly using, the practice of so-called 'gaming' to shift their results upwards? I can't seem to find much detail on what these equivalents actually are...

jenks
25-09-2012, 10:10 PM
This used to be known as teh Telford effect, whereby schools would artificially bump up pass rates. These would be courses like BTEC qualifications in various subjects which often are for big chunks of the timetable and are therefore sold to kids as 'equivalent' to 2 or sometimes even 4 GCSE C grades. You get your kids to get a pass in one of those and one other GCSE and you've got your 5 A*-C - one of the league table key 'performance indicators.' This is going to change in two years' time where the table will expressly be for GCSEs.

dd528
26-09-2012, 01:33 PM
One thing I would say is that although courses like BTECs are often (rightly) derided for their ridiculous 'GCSE-equivalency', that does not make them worthless in themselves. My mum is a science teacher in a state comp. Her school is in a very deprived ward and as a result they have a higher-than-average number of pupils of very low attainment standard or with SEN. For some of those students the GCSE (even single award) would simply be a waste of time. Due to their domestic circumstances they cannot be counted on to show up for their exams, let alone perform to the best of their ability in them. Their basic literacy and numeracy is often very poor.

The BTEC allows them to do long-term project work where the assessed goals are tied directly to their month-on-month learning. And in turn, the subject matter focuses explicitly on teaching science in the most applied and everyday context possible. To allow students to understand why their electricity bill will be what it is, or how the mobile phone network functions, etc.

And at the end of their 11 years of schooling, most of those kids will leave school with some science qualification, even if it is not the once-precious GCSE that Michael Gove has now decided is worthless. Employees can look at their BTEC and see that at least they will not be technologically ignorant, and that they were capable of engaging in their education in some long-term capacity. That has a value to the holder of that qualification because it demonstrates to them that there is some reward for their effort and perseverance. There are kids who will open their envelope on results day and one pass at BTEC will mean more to them than the handful of A*s means to the kid they are stood six feet away from.

The question of how we value the aspirations of those who will only ever be academically mediocre at best is a really fundamental one if you are interested in the goal of building an egalitarian educational system.

It is not clear yet what, if anything, will be replacing courses like BTECs and GNVQs at Key Stage 4. It is not clear whether Michael Gove actually feels like he needs to bother to provide educational opportunities to the children at that end of the spectrum, or whose strengths lie in non-academic achievement.

dd528
26-09-2012, 02:12 PM
Sorry also to answer your question baboon:

The BTEC is available at a range of levels from Key Stage 4 (i.e. GCSE-age kids), through to a higher education level. There are BTEC courses worth 2 and 4 GCSEs, and within that, depending on the tier of the qualification, that is supposed to be equivalent to either 2/4 D-F grades at GCSE or to 2/4 A*-C grades at GCSE. Once a student has been entered for a particular course, the only outcomes are pass, fail, merit and distinction. There is no A*-whatever grading system like with GCSEs.

BTECs are typically offered in an range of subjects with a highly vocational leaning, e.g. science, business, construction, media, healthcare.

The BTEC serves, by and large, as a replacement for the GNVQ. The GNVQ was similarly available at Key Stage 4 or 5, and provided a foundational qualification for school age children to possibly go on and acquire an NVQ through work or further study after leaving education. The GNVQ was scrapped a few years ago, but the NVQ continues and is one of the most common work-based qualifications available. An NVQ at the appropriate level remains a prerequisite for employment in a wide range of professions (in the leisure industry, social care work, in construction and manufacturing, etc.).

As jenks says, the league tables will stop recognising these vocational qualifications soon. It is frustrating because it is very important that schools excel at preparing students for vocational development when students show an interest or aptitude in that direction. And so schools that are good at doing that should get some recognition.

At the same time, including those subjects in the league tables just causes huge numbers of kids to be diverted into vocational courses that are unsuited to them just to bump up the overall GCSE pass rate and the 5 A*-C percentages. The year after I took my IT GCSE my school switched its entire KS4 IT entry over to a GNVQ course that took up far more of the timetable than my GCSE course, which was far less academically rigorous, and which was supposedly worth four times as many GCSEs. Undoubtedly this course was suitable for a small number of students who showed little aptitude in humanities, languages, etc., but who had a talent for applied IT. But the entire year was entered for the same qualification, simply in order to force up pass rates.*

The problem is that league tables are the bluntest of blunt instruments for demonstrating the strengths of schools. If the new EBacc policy goes through then the current form of GCSE league tables will be scrapped and replaced with something that is as-yet unannounced.

* I'm being a little disingenuous here. There are obviously other complications with teaching a number of different IT courses to one year group when it takes up so much of the timetable and there is a limitation on the physical computing resources actually available in a school.

jenks
26-09-2012, 02:42 PM
Two very good posts there dd528 that really do hit the nail on the head.

craner
14-11-2012, 12:51 PM
Gove’s status as Cameron’s latest Richelieu has grown in proportion to the declining fortunes of George Osborne (http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/politics/2012/11/emerging-conservative-world-view-more-goveism-cameronism)

One for Jenks!

matt b
14-11-2012, 02:31 PM
Gove’s status as Cameron’s latest Richelieu has grown in proportion to the declining fortunes of George Osborne (http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/politics/2012/11/emerging-conservative-world-view-more-goveism-cameronism)


Just shows how intellectually vapid the Tories are- Look at Gove's new great idea:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2012/nov/14/michael-gove-backs-learning-by-rote

Oh look and here's a Gove policy outcome:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/exclusive-thriving-schools-to-close-to-make-room-for-academies-8313131.html

Mr. Tea
14-11-2012, 04:11 PM
Just shows how intellectually vapid the Tories are- Look at Gove's new great idea:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2012/nov/14/michael-gove-backs-learning-by-rote


Excellent! Within a decade we should have a whole generation of school-leavers entering the workforce with all the skills they need to succeed in the 19th century!

Edit: heartening to see the comments are pretty much 100% on the side of anti-Gove righteousness.

crackerjack
14-11-2012, 08:48 PM
Just shows how intellectually vapid the Tories are- Look at Gove's new great idea:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2012/nov/14/michael-gove-backs-learning-by-rote


Solidly even-handed work by the Guardian pic ed there. :D

jenks
12-12-2012, 03:32 PM
I think this is on of the clearest assessments of what Gove is up to:


http://howardstevenson.org/2012/12/09/its-class-war-jim-but-not-as-we-know-it/

and good to know that lawfully union action is being respected:

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/education/michael-gove-tells-heads-dock-the-pay-of-disruptive-worktorule-staff-8411365.html

Webstarr
07-02-2013, 10:36 AM
https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/483436_10151260236166398_566003523_n.jpg

hucks
07-02-2013, 12:09 PM
Two main bits of Gove news this week. Firstly, his speech to Social Market Foundation where he says Gramsci is one of his heroes

http://www.smf.co.uk/media/news/michael-gove-speaks-smf/

I thought the speech was very interesting from a political perspective as he takes on Labour on what ought to be their own territory. He does it much more effectively than IDS or Pickles and it's worth thinking about why. I think it's because he talks entirely about systems and structures and blames them, rather than IDS's approach of apportioning blame to the individual. And Pickles's approach of being a fat buffoon.

The second one is the "embarrassing U turn" on the EBacc.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/blog/2013/feb/07/michael-gove-gcse-ebacc-politics-live

It does look like one at first glance, but I can't believe that's the case. I think he's surrendering something he doesn't care about (one exam board per subject) in order to get something he does (changing the curriculum). Is that right?

crackerjack
07-02-2013, 02:11 PM
Two main bits of Gove news this week. Firstly, his speech to Social Market Foundation where he says Gramsci is one of his heroes

http://www.smf.co.uk/media/news/michael-gove-speaks-smf/

I thought the speech was very interesting from a political perspective as he takes on Labour on what ought to be their own territory. He does it much more effectively than IDS or Pickles and it's worth thinking about why. I think it's because he talks entirely about systems and structures and blames them, rather than IDS's approach of apportioning blame to the individual. And Pickles's approach of being a fat buffoon.

The second one is the "embarrassing U turn" on the EBacc.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/blog/2013/feb/07/michael-gove-gcse-ebacc-politics-live

It does look like one at first glance, but I can't believe that's the case. I think he's surrendering something he doesn't care about (one exam board per subject) in order to get something he does (changing the curriculum). Is that right?

But he's losing the the Baccalaureate, right? He'll still make the syllabus focus more on exams and less on course assessment, but even there it seems he's giving some ground.

Don't overestimate the man. I know the right-wing parts of the press see him as their prince in waiting, but it's not easy governing in coalition. And never forget he is a goldfish-faced cunt.

baboon2004
07-02-2013, 02:34 PM
I wonder what Gramsci would have thought of Gove.

That he's a goldfish-faced cunt, probably.

it is interesting to read that SMF speech. As far as I can work out, what he wants is a return to the halcyon days where you could depend upon a servant having a good grasp of Dickens, while throwing around the key words 'social mobility' with no indication of how this will happen in the real world for any more than a very small minority.

"The lack of ambition evident in those figures was reinforced for me recently when we launched an initiative - open to every state school in the country - to enable their students to visit a top university, see for themselves how welcoming and exciting such places could be - and tempt them to apply." Now what happened recently that might make these top universities 'less tempting'...?

"There is no skill more central to employability than literacy. Whether it’s reading the instructions accompanying a deep fat fryer, running through the health and safety drill on an oil rig or processing an application for citizenship, literacy is the absolute precondition for holding down any job today."

Now that's a paragraph you'd struggle to make up.

dd528
07-02-2013, 07:12 PM
The man remains an idiot. It is not entirely clear what he is giving up in this supposed u-turn, because it was never entirely clear what his proposals involved in the first place. The EBacc was a vague, ill-conceived suggestion for legislation, and all that has happened is that it has been removed and a kind of brooding uncertainty left in its place.

I would not for a second imagine that Gove is done with mashing his fingers in school assessment and curriculum policy.

He seems to exist in some kind of fever dream where wild, ideologically-driven ideas can be dreamed up in a few weeks and brought to the table with a straight face. He cannot even take cover behind the idea that his suggestions are mandated by party manifesto.

If today was carte blanche for education policy then what I would suggest to the Secretary is that he launches a broad inquiry, taking in teachers (individually, and not merely as represented by their head-teachers or unions), pupils, parents, exam boards, and institutes of further and higher education to assess what they feel might work better than the status quo based upon their experience.

But today is not that day. Gove cares no more now about the education of your child than he did when he was appointed to his post. The only lesson he has learned is that the EBacc won't wash, so now he will set about some new plan that sates his political impulses but can have a more positive spin put on it. Maybe slip it into law through the backdoor whilst everyone's distracted with some kind of major crisis of economics or Europe or both.

jenks
07-02-2013, 08:32 PM
Pretty much agree with the above. Still launching his new National Curriculum, changing exams and getting rid of any coursework, controlled assessment, getting rid of tiers for exams. Still 3hrs in an exam hall. Still looking back to some golden age where we could all find the Raj on a map and name its Lord Lieutenants whilst reciting Kipling.

I think he has walked away from the EBC to keep the EBacc League tables which will be the measure of all schools - 8 subjects, the original EBC ones plus 3 others. The only difference is you don't get a certificate at the end of it and you can get all those annoying celeb actors (and the CBI and Ofqual and...and...) off your back saying you are ruining arts education in the country.

Gove is an ideologue but has just that right amount of pragmatism to walk away from the truly toxic elements of his programme - education will have his grubby thumbprints on it for at least a generation. And he's a fish lipped cunt.

Mr. Tea
08-02-2013, 06:09 AM
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BCe5NHvCQAEx7XN.jpg:large

e/y
13-03-2013, 08:15 PM
Louise Mensch ‏@LouiseMensch
Gove is simply the cleverest and ablest member of the Government (a high bar). It's like watching Ali box.
https://twitter.com/LouiseMensch/status/311863752939151360

lol "a high bar"

jenks
13-03-2013, 09:13 PM
So is he currently playing 'rope-a-dope'?

craner
14-03-2013, 10:00 AM
He's been gazumped by Teresa 'Not the Porn Model' May.

Mr. Tea
14-03-2013, 10:10 AM
Louise Mensch ‏@LouiseMensch
Gove is simply the cleverest and ablest member of the Government (a high bar). It's like watching Ali box.
https://twitter.com/LouiseMensch/status/311863752939151360

lol "a high bar"


@LouiseMensch I *bleeeeuuuuurrrghhh* *bleeeaaaarrgh* *blllllllaaaaaaaaaaaarrgh* I'm so sorry I *blllleeeeuuugh* Sorry, did that splash you?

pfffft

baboon2004
14-03-2013, 10:20 AM
The first and only person ever to compare Michael 'The Goldfish' Gove and Muhammad 'The Greatest' Ali.

Mr. Tea
14-03-2013, 11:53 AM
Float like an idiot, bumble like a bee.

Mr. Tea
13-05-2013, 01:41 AM
Dear Department for Education,

In the Mail on Sunday, 23 March 2013, the Secretary of State,
Michael Gove, wrote:

"Survey after survey has revealed disturbing historical ignorance,
with one teenager in five believing Winston Churchill was a
fictional character while 58 per cent think Sherlock Holmes was
real."

I should be grateful if you could give me details of these surveys:
who ran them, what questions were asked, when the surveys took
place,and size and make-up of samples.

I look forward to your reply.

Yours faithfully,

Janet Downs


Dear Ms Downs
Thank you for your email of 26 March, requesting details of a survey about
teenagers’ lack of historical knowledge.

Unfortunately, I am not able to provide you with the details of the survey
as it was commissioned and conducted by UKTV Gold. I would advise that
you contact UKTV Gold direct, as they should be able to assist you on this
matter.
Your correspondence has been allocated reference number 2013/0022443. If
you need to respond to us, please visit:
[1]www.education.gov.uk/contactus, and quote your reference number.

Yours sincerely

Emma Seymour
Curriculum Policy Division




Dear Department for Education,

Thank you for your reply saying that one survey about teenagers'
lack of historical knowledge was done by UKGold.

I should be grateful if you could let me know when the survey was
undertaken.

Michael Gove referred to "survey after survey". This indicates that
there was more than just one. But you have given me the name of
only one.

Would it be fair to say that there was actually only one survey and
not several as Mr Gove said?

Yours faithfully,

J Downs

Link to this



Dear Ms Downs
Thank you for your further email of 15 April, requesting details of the survey’s the Secretary of State referred to in his article in the Mail on Sunday,
about teenagers’ lack of historical knowledge.

As advised previously, you would need to contact UKTV Gold to find out details of their survey, including when it was undertaken.

The other survey’s the Secretary of State referred to include:

· a survey of 2000 11 to 16 year olds by Premier Inn;

· a study commissioned by Lord Ashcroft of 1000 children aged 11 to 18 to mark the unveiling of the Bomber Command Memorial in London;

· a report by Professor Robert Tombs for think-tank Politeia;

· an article by London Mums Magazine
[1]http://londonmumsmagazine.com/2013/with-...

· research carried out by the Sea Cadets to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar
[2]http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/edu...


Your correspondence has been allocated reference number 2013/0025074. If you need to respond to us, please visit: [3]www.education.gov.uk/contactus, and
quote your reference number.

As part of our commitment to improving the service we provide to our customers, we are interested in hearing your views and would welcome your comments via
our website at: [4]www.education.gov.uk/pcusurvey.

Yours sincerely

Francess Quinn
Ministerial and Public Communications Division



Dear Department for Education,

Thank you for your reply giving me details of the "survey's" (sic)
used to underpin Michael Gove's assertion that British teenagers
are ignorant of history......

:D

https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/details_of_surveys_underpinning

crackerjack
13-05-2013, 10:01 AM
I'd like to be shocked by this, but when you've got a supportive press and a neutered BBC there's really no disincentive to peddling this kind of noxious shite.

baboon2004
13-05-2013, 11:17 AM
Has there been a survey to determine what percentage of teenagers think Michael Gove is real?

Mr. Tea
09-07-2013, 04:57 PM
http://i242.photobucket.com/albums/ff231/bour3/misc%202/policymatic.gif

Patrick Swayze
09-07-2013, 06:44 PM
http://www.b3tards.com/u/6c0eb61421f758d43735/policymatic.gif

looooooooool

baboon2004
17-10-2013, 12:35 AM
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1492912417/ref=tsm_1_fb_lk#reader_1492912417

Mr. Tea
17-03-2014, 04:50 PM
Good (and worrying piece) about how bad it is and how much worse it's going to get: http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/mar/14/teachers-life-inside-the-exam-factory

(although the Gruan doesn't do itself too many favours by quoting an English teacher who uses "was like" to mean "said"...)

The first comment:




I am an English teacher in a secondary school and have taught Mice and Men by Steinbeck for many years. A book that kids, and particularly boys, enjoy. This week I was told that I should not teach the whole book and we certainly shouldn't read it all together as a class. We should simply read the parts that are relevant to the exam, and then watch the film to get the story. I quote:

"The book is merely a resource to use for passing the exam. "

Absolutely and utterly an exam factory. The ONLY thing that matters in education now.

It doesn't give the actual source for the line in bold, but I presume it's from some official DfE curriculum material. It's nothing we didn't know already years ago, i.e. that the purpose of schools has shifted entirely from educating children to merely training them to pass exams, but it's still (a little) shocking to hear it spelled out so clearly by the government.

comelately
17-03-2014, 05:08 PM
Good (and worrying piece) about how bad it is and how much worse it's going to get: http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/mar/14/teachers-life-inside-the-exam-factory

(although the Gruan doesn't do itself too many favours by quoting an English teacher who says "was like" to mean "said"...)

The first comment:



It doesn't give the actual source for the line in bold, but I presume it's from some official DfE curriculum material. It's nothing we didn't know already years ago, i.e. that the purpose of schools has shifted entirely from educating children to merely training them to pass exams, but it's still (a little) shocking to hear it spelled out so clearly by the government.

This may sound bad, but as a student we did a similar thing with Great Expectations for KS3 - that was over 20 years ago. I'm just saying.

baboon2004
17-03-2014, 11:44 PM
I'd agree that a significant part of teaching has always been directed at training kids to pass exams, but obviously the trend in this direction has become much more extreme over recent years.

The relentless and crushing emphasis upon measuring everything is by no means restricted to education though - it's society-wide. In the field in which I work, which relies upon obtaining grants in order to run projects of social usefulness, things have become similarly absurd with the hegemonic language of "outputs, outcomes and impact" imposed upon everyone. Qualitative evidence barely counts any longer.

Only just saw this part of the article:
'Sarah Cumberlidge remembers a taster day her school put on for kids in their last year of primary: "Little year 6s, who came in to do a lesson and try a few things. And afterwards, they said, 'But Miss, what was the learning objective?' I was horrified." '
As well you might be. Chilling.

firefinga
18-03-2014, 12:15 AM
The relentless and crushing emphasis upon measuring everything is by no means restricted to education though - it's society-wide.

Gotta agree here. I work in a technology related field and been doing this for a couple of years now. By now, I would say 25% of my time and energy by now I am wasting for "evaluation", filling out forms (on paper and online!!) sitting in meetings on "team evaluation" and all that crap. And I am working in the private sector!

Mr. Tea
18-03-2014, 09:47 AM
The relentless and crushing emphasis upon measuring everything is by no means restricted to education though - it's society-wide.

Oh, for sure - but I think it's in education that it's having potentially the most damaging and far-reaching long-term consequences (subjective judgement, of course). I know it's infected healthcare, transport, the civil service, policing, the military too, no doubt - just about everything.


In the field in which I work, which relies upon obtaining grants in order to run projects of social usefulness, things have become similarly absurd with the hegemonic language of "outputs, outcomes and impact" imposed upon everyone. Qualitative evidence barely counts any longer.


And anyone who quibbles must therefore be opposed to assessment of any kind, and the only reason you could have for feeling that way is not being any good at your job, right? Sigh.

you
18-03-2014, 12:54 PM
The relentless and crushing emphasis upon measuring everything is by no means restricted to education though - it's society-wide. In the field in which I work, which relies upon obtaining grants in order to run projects of social usefulness, things have become similarly absurd with the hegemonic language of "outputs, outcomes and impact" imposed upon everyone. Qualitative evidence barely counts any longer.



Spot on. Quantization is a capitalist symptom- when something becomes a market everyone breaks out the abaci and has a jolly time totting and re-totting stuff - doesn't matter that its not productive. Health, Education, Art or Sales.

What is even more galling about this trend is why, when most peoples mobile phone have more computational power than previous generations could even imagine, human energy is expended more and more on mundane quantification.

I remember a business I used to work at years ago - there were more people employed to count, manage and evaluate than there were to sell and install the product.

----

Education is now a market, hence the absurd quantification obsession. All the commentary by the major political parties is focused on competition, that our kids need skills and education that will enable some form of business advantage in a future global market. When was the last time you heard 'experience', 'happiness' or 'well being' mentioned in relation to education on QT? Creativity is only brought up now as a commodity the west can export.

Quantification doesn't help even business, but its a virus that spreads in the quasi-open unfathomable market. Choice is elucidated nicely in The Wire - do you become McNulty and fight against Bureaucracy - or be like Bunk and accept to work within it.

Mr. Tea
18-03-2014, 01:14 PM
I remember a business I used to work at years ago - there were more people employed to count, manage and evaluate than there were to sell and install the product.

I remember vimothy posted this here years ago, it's stuck with me ever since:


Pournelle's Iron Law of Bureaucracy states that in any bureaucratic organization there will be two kinds of people:


First, there will be those who are devoted to the goals of the organization. Examples are dedicated classroom teachers in an educational bureaucracy, many of the engineers and launch technicians and scientists at NASA, even some agricultural scientists and advisors in the former Soviet Union collective farming administration.

Secondly, there will be those dedicated to the organization itself. Examples are many of the administrators in the education system, many professors of education, many teachers union officials, much of the NASA headquarters staff, etc.

The Iron Law states that in every case the second group will gain and keep control of the organization. It will write the rules, and control promotions within the organization.

Seems relevant here.

Also, isn't this one of those areas where 'advanced' capitalist economies have bizarrely seemed to converge, in certain respects, on the modes of organization typical of the totalitarian socialist states of the last century? Except now it's %age of kids passing Maths/Science/English at grade A*-C, rather than tons of rice/coal/steel/whatever produced - everyone, from whole regions of a country down to individuals, has to constantly demonstrate against the standard metric that they are doing their bit.

you
18-03-2014, 01:34 PM
I remember vimothy posted this here years ago, it's stuck with me ever since:



Seems relevant here.

Also, isn't this one of those areas where advance capitalist economies have bizarrely seemed to converge, in certain respects, on the modes of organization typical of the totalitarian socialist states of the last century? Except now it's %age of kids passing Maths/Science/English at grade A*-C, rather than tons of rice/coal/steel/whatever produced - everyone, from whole regions of a country down to individuals, has to constantly demonstrate against the standard metric that they are doing their bit.

I'm not sure it's as straight forward as that - although I see the comparison tbf. Rather, I think the 2nd category is now less totalitarian - it is atomized and farmed out to almost every individual (think self reporting and evaluation)... so much so that the demand for the 2nd category inhibits the achievement of the 1st. If you are a doctor, car salesman or teacher you would lose the job if you didn't complete the quantifying actions from the 2nd category - how many 1st goals you achieve, healing/treating/selling/teaching wouldn't mean shit if you didn't play the bureaucracy game and evaluation of the 2nd category. McNulty was the example here - he wanted to be true police at the expense of paperwork and protocol, thus he got canned.

Patrick Swayze
24-03-2014, 05:52 PM
Mice and Men by Steinbeck [...] A book that kids, and particularly boys, enjoy.


http://images2.naharnet.com/images/11496/w460.jpg

griftert
26-03-2014, 06:27 PM
Shocking story http://michaelrosenblog.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/gove-nicked-our-schools-and-handed-them.html

jenks
26-03-2014, 06:44 PM
Having spent the day on strike and hearing various accounts of how 'selfish' we are, Gove has done well to throw the spotlight on us and continue not to answer any direct question on anything. Instead he got his LibDem attack dog on the case - Laws. Nothing at present that I hear about Gove surprises me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

john eden
27-03-2014, 01:22 PM
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Bjue8qvCEAEvmQc.jpg:large

Mr. Tea
27-03-2014, 02:35 PM
^That's a mistake, the original question had the word "children" at the end.

matt b
01-04-2014, 08:38 PM
The Education Secretary, Michael Gove, has approved a plan to spend £45m on a free school, making it almost certainly the most expensive in the country even though it has just 500 students, The Independent has learnt.

The cost of setting up the Harris Westminster Sixth Form for high-achieving students is six times the average cost of establishing a free school and equates to around £90,000 per pupil.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/exclusive-anger-over-new-free-school-that-may-be-be-britains-mostexpensive-9222364.html

(FYI: sixth forms get just under £4000 per pupil, down from approx £4500 in 2010 and this is to be cut further by Gove)

Mr. Tea
15-07-2014, 12:06 PM
Bye bye Gove, gonna miss you big guy. xoxox


https://mtc.cdn.vine.co/r/videos/B37F25032A1042098649561460736_1e31fa53182.4.7.4014 026552012812821_Nu9AYLy8x0ce6dUZAYNJLWoLGf7s_Orf9s b00eWsnXUrTOppQLgOHdR.Q_BC5J9Y.mp4?versionId=Y.IAv SySTr3ZfM7HcGEJlFrqy9MQqdGG