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rubberdingyrapids
06-07-2012, 09:30 AM
thought i would start this for stuff - anything basically - about film that isnt just about films you loved or hated.

here is a cool john waters interview -
http://rookiemag.com/2012/02/teenage-girls-assaulted-by-wild-animals-an-interview-with-john-waters/

i think the cinema at tate modern might be my favourite cinema in all of london. i cant believe i have never been there til recently. it looks great, and its basically better than most proper cinemas in the city, which is a bit tragic. and most crucially, people dont seem to talk or use their phones.

rubberdingyrapids
11-08-2012, 10:24 PM
sight and sound has got a new best films of all time poll -
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news/50-greatest-films-all-time/

its vertigo instead of citizen kane which is a nice change at last but the rest of the list is still a bit conservative - its like people are scared to vote for something that wasnt voted for already. plus im just suspicious of vertigo being no 1 when its hitchcock season this and next month at the bfi.

i would put enter the void at number one.

Corpsey
12-08-2012, 04:19 AM
Vertigo is certainly one of the best films I've ever seen, though I do think it helped that I was extremely stoned when watching it and so was susceptible to the vivid colours and strange, almost surreal atmosphere of it. I didn't care that the story doesn't make much sense, and is at times quite boring unless you're appropriately hypnotised. But I was - and it seemed like I was watching a beautiful, sinister dream, something almost magical, but mixed in with all this psychological unease.

I think Rear Window is up there with Vertigo as far as Hitchcock goes, though it seems less profound but more entertaining and more brilliantly conceived.

The other best films I've ever seen were Wild Strawberries by Bergman and Barry Lyndon by Kubrick. Well, perhaps not best but certainly the ones that most profoundly effected me.

The list is conservative but I have found that all of those films which are rated as all-time classics, when I've watched them, have completely lived up to their reputations. Their canonisation almost puts you off them, because it adds this stuffy aura of holiness, but that's just a reputation. You feel like rolling your eyes reading endless veneration of Vertigo and Kane, but then you watch the actual films and their brilliance is so shiningly obvious. Well, in my experience anyway.

rubberdingyrapids
12-08-2012, 09:09 AM
Their canonisation almost puts you off them, because it adds this stuffy aura of holiness, but that's just a reputation.

this is part of my problem. i think i need to just watch them like anything else.

ive seen about half of the top 50.

craner
14-08-2012, 12:41 PM
So Citizen Kane was dropped, but in favour of fucking Vertigo rather than Shiver of the Vampires. Vertigo isn't even the best Hitchcock film.

crackerjack
14-08-2012, 04:37 PM
So Citizen Kane was dropped, but in favour of fucking Vertigo rather than Shiver of the Vampires. Vertigo isn't even the best Hitchcock film.

Any fule kno that's Lady Vanishes, closely followed by Notorious.

baboon2004
15-08-2012, 05:55 PM
Nothing by the Farrelly Brothers? C'mon.

Only two films post-1970 in the top 20 kind of says it all. But on the plus side, Mulholland Dr as best film of the 2000s and inclusion of La Jetee, and no Godfather Part II or Coen Brothers.

Tarkovsky vote was massively split else he'd have had one in the top ten.

The individual top ten lists (available from today apparently?) will be way more interesting, as always with this type of thing.

baboon2004
15-08-2012, 11:20 PM
Ah, you're right, missed it. What a disappointment. Unimaginably dull - how it could be preferred to The Conversation is beyond me. Apocalypse Now is certainly worthy of first place for Coppola though.

Not sure 'serious' critics ever rated Casablanca, did they? I would've been very surprised to see it on this list, though on an Empire list it'd probably be top ten.

rubberdingyrapids
16-08-2012, 06:38 AM
redux is amazing, esp that plantation scene. they were showing it at riverside this sunday gone but i didnt go cos i thought i would stay in and watch the end of the olympics. :mad:

on a diff topic, i was pleased to see cronenberg say this.


“A superhero movie, by definition, you know, it’s comic book. It’s for kids. It’s adolescent in its core,” explains Cronenberg. “That has always been its appeal, and I think people who are saying ‘The Dark Knight Rises’ is, you know, supreme cinema art, I don’t think they know what the f**k they’re talking about.”

“I think it’s still Batman running around in a stupid cape… Christopher Nolan’s best movie is ‘Memento,’ and that is an interesting movie. I don’t think his Batman movies are half as interesting, though they’re 20 million times the expense. What he is doing is some very interesting technical stuff, which, you know, he’s shooting IMAX and in 3-D. That’s really tricky and difficult to do. I read about it in ‘American Cinematography Magazine,’ and technically, that’s all very interesting. The movies, to me, they’re mostly boring.” [Film.com/NextMovie]

http://filmdrunk.uproxx.com/2012/08/david-cronenberg-on-dark-knight-its-still-batman-running-around-in-a-stupid-cape

baboon2004
16-08-2012, 12:46 PM
yeah. I watched Redux three times in one sitting a few years back.

fair enough. I've always been under the impression that it's held in pretty high regard. (it should be. it's brilliant.)

Still not seen Redux in fact, must rectify that.

I have nothing against Casablanca, but it would be way too trad/conservative* to fit into Sight and Sound's ethos, wouldn't it? More likely to appear in a list with the Shawshank Redemption etc. Edit: Just checked, and sure enough, in Empire's 500 Best Films they chart at #18 and #4 respectively. Interestingly, Coppola seems significantly - but maybe Hitchcock is close?- the most successful director across both publications (Godfather and Apocalypse Now are both in Empire's top ten)

*obv Sight and Sound seems conservative in a different way (ie too few films from the last 40 years). On reflection, also seems odd that only one Kubrick film made the grade (and far from his best film, imo).

craner
16-08-2012, 01:00 PM
I find it quite easy to list my favorite films (Ghostbusters has been topping it consistently for the last 25 years) but trying to list what I would consider the greatest films ever made, on some sort of semi-objective basis, is head-scrambling. Really hard. It's made harder by the fact that I haven't seen that many films made outside of Italy 1960-80. I wouldn't even try to do it. So I sort of respect The List, even if I do find it baffling and/or boring.

baboon2004
16-08-2012, 01:07 PM
Ghostbusters is timeless, watched it again recently - must be in the Empire Top 20 too (didn't check).

rubberdingyrapids
16-08-2012, 11:15 PM
jaws is the best film of all time now i think about it.
in fact monster movies should be higher in these lists in general.

baboon2004
17-08-2012, 11:42 AM
I LOVE Jaws - best-paced film that I can think of. Almost like two films in one. Plus there are some simply gorgeous nouvelle-vague type shots in it, particularly at the beginning.

Gregor XIII
18-08-2012, 02:06 AM
@rubberdingyrapids: It's not that I disagree with Cronenberg (sorry, I can't figure out how to quote your quote), but isn't it a bit weird that he criticises a film for being "comic book" when he himself made A History of Violence...

The Sight and Sound Top 250 is out now, btw. Casablanca is on it. As is Star Wars and King Kong and Gone With the Wind and stuff like that. But no Shawshank Redemption or Superhero-film. I think the weirdest thing is, that Tree of Life is the highest charting Malick-film.

rubberdingyrapids
18-08-2012, 09:48 AM
not seen tree of life yet but i doubt it can be better than badlands or days of heaven. the best thing about the S&S polls are seeing the individual lists and seeing who broke away from The Canon. tarantino is always good for this.

was history of violence comic book? i just remember it as being a good though pretty straightforward thriller. eastern promises wasnt much better either. but id still watch either of those again over any of the last 3 batman films (i like tim burtons first one and batman forever more - they also just looked better - nolans gotham looks pedestrian, like any other american metropolis, its boringly normal and everyday, theres a complete absence of surrealism or fantasy). nolans batman films bore me with their over exposition and self importance. i also hate how its almost forbidden to think theyre shit. which is why i like when cronenberg says:


Do you think the subject matter prohibits the elevated art form?
DC: Absolutely. Anybody who works in the studio system has got 20 studio people sitting on his head at every moment, and they have no respect, and there's no…it doesn't matter how successful you've been. And obviously Nolan has been very successful. He's got a lot of power, relatively speaking. But he doesn't really have power.
So that's a no.
DC: I would say that's a no, you know. And the problem is you gotta… as I say, you can do some interesting, maybe unexpected things. And certainly, I've made the horror films and people say, "Can you make a horror film also an art film?" And I would say, "Yeah, I think you can." But a superhero movie, by definition, you know, it's comic book. It's for kids. It's adolescent in its core. That has always been its appeal, and I think people who are saying, you know, "Dark Knight Rises" is, you know, supreme cinema art," I don't think they know what the f**k they're talking about.

http://www.nextmovie.com/blog/robert-pattinson-david-cronenberg-cosmopolis-interview

Gregor XIII
18-08-2012, 02:53 PM
A History of Violence was based on a "graphic novel" but maybe that's completely different to Cronenberg. Of course, The Dark Knight Returns have been described as one of the first graphic novels, even though it was originally published in monthly installments.

Ah well, probably doesn't matter. I think I just get annoyed when someone who's just filmed a DeLillo-novel talks about bad subject material. I really, really hate DeLillo, and I kinda doubt Cronenberg knows that much about literature, comic-books or otherwise.

rubberdingyrapids
05-09-2012, 09:20 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/sep/05/spring-breakers-review

new harmony korine film looks like it could be brilliant.

cinema figures in decline -
http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2012/sep/04/box-office-busting-blocks-tom-shone

not really surprised tbh. its obviously just going to go the way of the music industry. shame. though ticket prices are extortionate.

IdleRich
09-09-2012, 01:34 PM
I saw the latest Batman in the cinema and I totally agree. I could have handled how stupid it was and I could have handled its self-importance if it were good - but the way it was so stupid and self-important was too much. And you're right there was no real surrealness or interest to the backdrop.
I'd like to see Cronenberg's Cosmopolis though. I like Delillo sometimes. Though not that book come to think of it.

rubberdingyrapids
20-09-2012, 11:00 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-19622445

this is quite brilliant.

baboon2004
20-09-2012, 11:14 AM
When's the new Haneke coming out? To answer my own question: 16 November.

That'll be my one assured cinema trip this year. Really should make more effort to find out what's on.

Re the cinema ninjas - that's amazing but they'd be in real trouble in some other countries, where it seems not to be a problem at all to answer one's phone during a film. Which took some getting used to on my part.

rubberdingyrapids
20-09-2012, 12:04 PM
which countries?

i think the new haneke is playing at the london film festival in october...

baboon2004
20-09-2012, 12:10 PM
Mexico I remember there being a constant stream of people taking phone calls, for example. Very bizarre given my usual experience.

Might well try to get tickets in that case. Any Haneke film is a bit of an ordeal, but usually in a worthwhile way.

Bangpuss
20-09-2012, 02:34 PM
PT Anderson's new one, The Master, looks the business. As usual. I can't think of many oeuvres that beat the guy's who made: Hard Eight (a little-known classic!); Boogie Nights; Magnolia; There Will Be Blood; and even coaxed a half-decent performance out of Adam Sandler.

Even more interesting, his next project is said to be... a Thomas Pynchon adaptation! Inherent Vice, though. Not read it. Anyone?

BareBones
21-09-2012, 05:22 PM
Inherent Vice is Pynchon's weakest novel by some distance imo, but it's probably the only one that could realistically be turned into a film (it's pretty short, has a much more straightforward narrative etc). Could work better as a film maybe, i'm sure PT Anderson could do something good with it

Bangpuss
24-09-2012, 01:28 PM
Have you read Mason & Dixon? It sounds interesting although I doubt I'll get round to it, seeing as it's really prohibitively long.

I think The Crying of Lot 49 could make an interesting TV special. Gravity's Rainbow could be a Lord of the Rings-style movie trilogy. I don't think they're as 'unfilmable' as people claim, if you're willing to accept that much of the brilliance of the work -- its linguistic virtuosity -- will be lost when conveyed with moving pictures and sound, and not written words. But it would still be possible to portray the story and the characters pretty faithfully. I mean, that may not be worthwhile, but it would be possible. I think PT Anderson will make it worthwhile, although it's still a long way away.

IdleRich
24-09-2012, 09:18 PM
I started reading Mason and Dixon and was about a hundred pages in and enjoying it a lot when I somehow lost it while drunk. Shame that, I'd like to know what happens but I got distracted by various other books and I dunno when I'm likely to get hold of another copy.

BareBones
25-09-2012, 04:14 PM
Mason & Dixon is my favourite Pynchon, I love that book. Again though I dunno how successful or worthwhile a film of it could be really

Inherent Vice is a kind of parody of the Raymond Chandler hard-boiled noirish detective story and it's much more of a genre-novel than anything else he's done, which is why it's easily the most immediately film-able of his stuff.

It could be good so long as whoever plays the main character, Doc Sportello, can pull off the 60s hippie pothead thing without being really annoying, something which the book failed to do imo...

luka
25-09-2012, 06:03 PM
tree of life is the comfortably the worst film ive ever seen. well, that and the cronenberg one about freud and jung. had to walk out of both. torturous. what films are you lot interested in seeing in that film festival? not that im inviting you out or anything. just curious.

viktorvaughn
17-12-2012, 11:07 AM
Tree of Life was agonising.

Yo team, my other 1/2's getting bored of all my films being horror movies, giallos, various depressing subtitled films and other things (at least that's how she characterises it) so I'm looking for any recommendation on comedy, fun adventure films, feel good classics etc...thanks.

Started with the Indiana Jones 4 films. First one's a classic and then seem to get steadily worse as they progress. The 2nd one is really quite racist.

IdleRich
17-12-2012, 11:12 AM
"Mason & Dixon is my favourite Pynchon, I love that book. Again though I dunno how successful or worthwhile a film of it could be really"
Lost my copy of that book while drunk. What happens after the second time they set off from England?

baboon2004
17-12-2012, 11:19 AM
@VV Yeah, Temple of Doom looks very different to me now compared to when I first watched it at the age of 7. It's best when they just stick to Indy vs Nazis.

Ghostbusters generally works even after the 20th time of watching. Failsafe. Even #2 is far from bad. Kill Bill 1 and 2 are another easygoing (well...) pair that don't get tired.

rubberdingyrapids
17-12-2012, 11:50 PM
go with the first back to the future. or the second one.

or try something more recent like that ryan gosling film with emma stone and steve carrel.

im worried that i cant think of too many positive and happy films to recommend. apart from pixar stuff or cartoons. i liked rio!

rubberdingyrapids
09-01-2013, 12:24 PM
shittest bafta nominations ever -
http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2013/jan/09/baftas-2013-nominations-list?intcmp=ILCMUSTXT9387

rubberdingyrapids
11-01-2013, 02:11 PM
this might ruin a lot of herzog films -
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/10/klaus-kinski-rape-claims-daughter

CrowleyHead
11-01-2013, 02:18 PM
this might ruin a lot of herzog films -
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/10/klaus-kinski-rape-claims-daughter

This is the least surprising rape accusation in the history of mankind right here. I'm sorry.

IdleRich
12-01-2013, 01:00 PM
I concur. There isn't exactly gonna be anyone saying "He seemed like such a nice guy, kept himself to himself..." - he pretty much claimed he had an affair with Natassja (sp) until she threatened to sue him. Total cunt through and through.

IdleRich
13-01-2013, 01:59 PM
I enjoyed this article a lot

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/13/magazine/here-is-what-happens-when-you-cast-lindsay-lohan-in-your-movie.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

I'm also looking forward to the film a lot - Paul Schrader and Brett Easton Ellis making a noir pastiche with a porn star on a micro-budget and a troubled set. It's got all the makings of some kind of beautiful mess. Sometimes I think that noir pastiche is my favourite kind of film.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPowakhqVVQ

nochexxx
24-02-2013, 02:12 PM
I enjoyed this article a lot

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/13/magazine/here-is-what-happens-when-you-cast-lindsay-lohan-in-your-movie.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

I'm also looking forward to the film a lot - Paul Schrader and Brett Easton Ellis making a noir pastiche with a porn star on a micro-budget and a troubled set. It's got all the makings of some kind of beautiful mess. Sometimes I think that noir pastiche is my favourite kind of film.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPowakhqVVQ

that does sound good! never realised Paul Schrader was so down on his luck, is that really the case?

IdleRich
24-02-2013, 03:21 PM
I dunno. And how can Brett Easton Ellis be anything than a multimillionaire? I wonder if those aspects were played down somehow.

rubberdingyrapids
25-02-2013, 10:46 PM
i saw a clip of the schrader movie. read lots of worrying stuff about it. i think his time might have passed. still love him though.

stunned at argo winning the best picture oscar though i probably shouldnt be.

Bangpuss
15-03-2013, 03:50 PM
The dude who made Primer has got a new film coming out. It debuted at Sundance, and will be playing at the O2 when Sundance comes to London. It's called Upstream Color.

rubberdingyrapids
15-04-2013, 11:37 AM
this looks interesting -
http://www.princecharlescinema.com/events/events.php?seasonanchor=therep

THE REP reveals that the passion for a cinematic experience is still alive. The question is, will a greater audience recognize their cultural value before it’s too late?

The film follows the lives of three uber film geeks during the first year of operations of a single-screen repertory cinema. Dubbed ‘The Underground Cinema’ by its gang of misfits, Alex, Charlie and Nigel will stop at nothing to see their theatre succeed. In the face of strong competition from big box theatres, local cinematheques and home video, it’s a constant struggle to stay afloat. Throw in 12-hour workdays, having no semblance of a personal life and all the normal stresses of working day in/day out with the same people… things couldn’t be much more of an uphill battle.

THE REP also takes a broader look at the world of repertory cinema in North America. Currently being devalued by studios, corporate theatres and patrons themselves, movies have become less of an experience and more of an activity. Watching a film is something you just do to pass the time, rather than the event and spectacle they once were. Repertory cinema is an ever-shrinking but ever-passionate world of film lovers trying to keep the experience of cinema alive.

The film features interviews with theatres such as Film Forum in NYC, The Alamo Drafthouse in Austin, The New Beverly Cinema in L.A., The Hollywood Theatre in Portland, The Bijou Art Cinemas in Eugene and Blue Sunshine in Montreal. It also features celebrity commentary from Kevin Smith, John Waters, Atom Egoyan, George A. Romero and many more.

craner
28-06-2013, 12:59 PM
Has anybody got a copy of Angus MacKinnon's 'Apocalypse Now' review from NME December 1979, by any chance?

baboon2004
06-09-2013, 09:14 AM
The Diana film looks like an all-time classic of bad cinema, from the initial reviews. A straight-to-DVD release might have been more fitting.

rubberdingyrapids
06-09-2013, 09:56 AM
i have missed the other recent terrible films (john carter, the lone ranger) so this is on my to see list.

i used to like naomi watts - the american version of funny games is underrated, theres also king kong, and obv, mulholland drive.

e/y
06-09-2013, 10:42 AM
John Carter was unwatchable.

the trailer for the Robocop remake looks terrible, too.

IdleRich
06-09-2013, 11:07 AM
"Poor Princess Diana," wrote Guardian critic Peter Bradshaw.
"I hesitate to use the term 'car crash cinema'. But the awful truth is that, 16 years after that terrible day in 1997, she has died another awful death."
Oh dear.

baboon2004
10-09-2013, 04:30 PM
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/sep/10/london-fields-martin-amis-adaptation-starts-shooting

How fitting that the adaptation of the worst novel I have ever (part) read, is to be directed by the mastermind behind Katy Perry's lyrical 'California Gurls' promo. Beautiful.

Patrick Swayze
11-09-2013, 09:19 PM
Piece in the Guardian about Jurassic Park 4 put me on to this review of a (now canned) script for the film involving dinosaur/human hybrids sent in to free the US of the marauding dinosaur threat.

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/18166

Shame it won't ever get made.

baboon2004
23-09-2013, 09:01 AM
"Poor Princess Diana," wrote Guardian critic Peter Bradshaw.
"I hesitate to use the term 'car crash cinema'. But the awful truth is that, 16 years after that terrible day in 1997, she has died another awful death."

Oh dear.

"As someone who once owned a holiday home in Egypt he should have been aware that revolutions can be bloody, messy and extremely painful but, ignoring the potential collateral damage, he audaciously drove his tanks over scores of sensibilties."

http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2013/sep/23/paolo-di-canio-sunderland

Once is careless, but two seems like a new editorial policy.

craner
17-10-2013, 09:35 PM
My film blog (http://cinecittastudios.wordpress.com/) is fully loaded with old stuff now. Please read and enjoy. I have lots of new things I want to write for it once I've sorted out a few domestic arrangements chez Craner.

muser
21-10-2013, 05:39 AM
Saw "Big River Man" last night, was a lot of fun. its "Man on a Wire" but with an overweight psychologically unstable and alcoholic Slovenian. He's swimming down the entire length of the Amazon, filmed and narrated by his son, and seemingly gradually looses his mind, along with his navigator, as the film progresses.

baboon2004
12-11-2013, 10:49 AM
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/12/nymphomaniac-lars-von-trier-hardcore

this promises to be an entertaining car crash. Wonder how many people in Copenhagen are planning to see it on Xmas Day - the fact that cinemas are open suggests it's less of a depressing Christmas destination than London (a 40-minute walk to find a pub that was open last Dec 25th. Thankfully the place we found was straight out of Lynch, which was the upside)

IdleRich
05-12-2013, 05:39 PM
I'm rather looking forward to this. Did anyone hear that thing about how the trailer somehow got accidentally shown prior to a Disney made kids' film? Sounds pretty funny. I find it hard to understand how these accidents happen but I'm glad that they do.

mistersloane
07-12-2013, 03:17 AM
John Carter was unwatchable.



John Carter was epic. Not only is it the best, most forgettable, film title ever but it succeeded in being one-man-convinces-an-entire-industry-to-fund-his-lifelong-dream.

In terms of film coups, it's up there with Peter Chesholm getting money to do "Funny Bones" after "Hear my Song".

rubberdingyrapids
12-02-2014, 09:12 PM
saw this on the mubi film forum. its vincent gallo on the competition (guessing its just a list of quotes from over the year but its sort of brilliant and terrible) -

“Spike Jonze sucks bad. I’ve known Spike Jonze since he was 11 years old and he’s a rich jew from the upper east side. He’s embarrassing as a BMXer and he’s embarrassing as a skateboarder. He’s the biggest fraud out there. If you bring him to a party he’s the least interesting person at the party, he’s the person who doesn’t know anything. He’s the person who doesn’t say anything funny, interesting, intelligent… He’s a pig piece of shit.”

“The only impact Harmony Korine will have is on the lives of the girls he slipped drugs to, got stoned and raped while they were passed out.”

“Gummo — when I think of all the great films that barely get released, to think of this midget, rich Jew from Nashville coming to New York City pretending he’s Jean-Luc Goddard, and getting to make that piece of crap — wow. You young kids are lost. You don’t have anything better to do with your time? Why don’t you clean your apartments, or at least your bongs.”

“Last year, there was an exhibition of my work at the Agnès B. gallery [in Paris] and a guy comes sniffing me. I pushed him back like I would have any other schmuck coming too close to me. A year after that, he’s President of the Jury at Cannes and he’s fingering Gus [Van Sant]. They’re fingering each other with the dick of that blond guy from Elephant in their mouths… Disgusting.”

“I wouldn’t work for Martin Scorsese for $10 million. He hasn’t made a good film in 25 years. I would never work with an egomaniac has-been.”

“Quentin Tarantino is a collage artist. Period. He may be a clever collage artist, he may be a successful collage artist, in the public’s eye. But he’s a collage artist, and collage, although it does have its own language and sensibility, it never has soul.”

“Wes Anderson wouldn’t know aesthetic if it bopped him in the head. So when he makes a problem to the producers, it’s not even related to his vision in the way you would think. It’s related to some idea he has about himself or his place in history or what he’s seen before that he likes that he wants in his project, too. He saw in somebody’s movie that they used white background with black credits in their title sequence, like I did in Buffalo 66, now he wants it for Rushmore or whatever.”

“Steven Soderbergh sucks. Wes Anderson sucks.”

“Truth or Consequences, N.M., which was hardly directed by Kiefer Sutherland”

“Mark Romanek, that dark, anal photo plagiarist and his useless penis”

“The dreadful thriftshop ad I Shot Andy Warhol, why would anybody put Lili Taylor in a movie? She is so ugly. Ugly is ugly ok, it’s not interesting. It’s ugly, OK? She ugly. Ugly ugly ugly. I don’t like her. Plus she’s an asshole. Nothing worse than an ugly asshole, shouldn’t ugly people at least be nice?”

“Kusturica, is a bloody idiot and an egocentric. (…) What an idiot ! He’s the worst director I’ve ever seen, and I really don’t like his work.”

“Sofia Coppola likes any guy who has what she wants. If she wants to be a photographer she’ll fuck a photographer. If she wants to be a filmmaker, she’ll fuck a filmmaker. She’s a parasite just like her fat, pig father was.”

“Abel Ferrara was on so much crack when I did The Funeral, he was never on set. He was in my room trying to pick-pocket me.”

“Paul ‘I can’t direct but boy, can I brown nose my way to the top’ Anderson”

“Jim Jarmusch doesn’t have soul.”

IdleRich
14-02-2014, 01:25 PM
I agree with a lot of that.

baboon2004
14-02-2014, 02:12 PM
I was gonna say, if he could be less boring and deal with his misogyny and need to point out where someone is Jewish, Gallo would be right on a lot of that. Doesn't lay into Wes Anderson enough, though.

IdleRich
14-02-2014, 02:20 PM
Yeah, agreed there on all counts. I asked my friend if he could guess whose quotes they were and he said "i think i got it from the first 'jew'". You start to realise that Gallo isn't joking and doesn't have any bigger points, he's just an anti-semite.
He's right about Kusturica though.

baboon2004
14-02-2014, 04:15 PM
On another subject, I would've thought this would be quite interesting to many here, especially those in London:
http://fullunemploymentcinema.wordpress.com/2014/02/13/death-on-the-run/

I think some of the films showing there have been discussed on these pages, in fact

rubberdingyrapids
15-02-2014, 03:40 PM
the brown bunny is a masterpiece btw, just in case anyone dismissed it. he fucks it up in the last act or thereabouts (iirc) but until then, its one of the best american indies of the past 20 years. totally underrated.

also, it has a great blowjob scene that manages to be more than just sexploitation 'cant believe theyre filming that' and is actually one of the most emotional scenes in the whole film. how many sex scenes can you say that about?

padraig (u.s.)
15-02-2014, 05:36 PM
^Brown Bunny is possibly the single worst film I've ever seen. meandering, pointless, self-indulgent to an laughable degree garbage. I do grant you the blowjob scene was neither exploitative or gratuitous, or at least any more gratuitous that than the other 90 minutes. ymmv I guess. Buffalo 66 isn't very good either.

however, I too agree w/the majority of those quotes, or at least the ones that aren't just personal attacks w/homophobic, anti-semitic, sexist etc overtones. there's no call to accuse Coppola of sleeping around, just validly criticize her on the basis of her terrible, terrible films. I'm on record as to the unredeemed shittiness of Korine, Wes Anderson is like the filmmaking avatar of Etsy complete with the hip white liberal's sketchy grasp of race and general ignorance of the world, Scorsese hasn't made a truly great film since the Last Temptation. never seen Kusturica's work. one other thing - Gallo's weird, Kerouac/Mailer-ish use of the word "soul" to decide the validity of other white directors, Gallo actually reminds of Kerouac that way, white working-class sons of immigrants who became part of seminal art scenes in NYC but surprised people by retaining conservative political views seemingly totally at odds with those scenes.

rubberdingyrapids
15-02-2014, 08:18 PM
it is seriously fucked up that gallo hasnt really done all that much lately. i think i read that he made a film that ended up getting scrapped. but youd think he would at least have some cult of personality cred to get funded more. if only so he could do more press, and then we could learn more of his excellent and highly accurate views on the rest of his peers. or is that his excellent and highly accurate views on his peers are exactly why no one wants to work with him/bankroll him anymore? of course it could just be that he has no more good ideas. i think thats fine actually, im fine with more directors retiring after their one great film (buffalo 66 in his case). its hard to continually have something to say.

brown bunny is a great, oddly sensitive and sometimes tender as well as occasionally moronic/suitably pathetic essay on a certain kind of male narcissicism/self-loathing and masculinity.

Corpsey
16-02-2014, 06:20 PM
As cutesy and quirky as they may be, I've enjoyed a lot of the Wes Anderson films I've seen - "Rushmore" and "Moonrise Kingdom'' especially. I think they're funny. I can see why people despise his films but they seem to work for me. I've never seen any of Gallo's films, is "The Brown Bunny" the one to check out?

rubberdingyrapids
16-02-2014, 08:56 PM
i used to hate wes anderson but have come round to his films since i saw darjeeling. hes a bit too obsessed with tone and style and look over all else -his films are basically like characters in little dollshouses - but hey, he is a great stylist. and there is a lot of love thats gone into them, even if they are also a bit smug and ironic at times. actually, im not sure if it is even irony, or if it is just trying to be too clever by half, and being afraid of real feeling. that last one, moonrise kindgom, about the two kids was really sweet though. id like to see him make a movie without big stars in it. it often seems like half the draw of them is just seeing a million big names all together, often against type (eg bruce willis), and acting very quirky.

Corpsey
17-02-2014, 10:32 AM
I feel like a lot of really good directors have such a particular vision/style that they're bound to be deficient in certain areas - i.e. Kubrick, an absolute genius but undeniably something of a "cold" film-maker. What I mean to say is that you could look at Kubrick films (as many critics have e.g. Pauline Kael) and see nothing more than smug, over-intellectual pretentiousness. But if you're into what he does, this 'coldness' becomes a virtue.

Not to say Anderson's on Kubrick's level of course! Just that, while I can see that his films are very smug and self-conscious, I can accept that as part of his particular style because I enjoy other elements of it. In the same way that I might like a person despite their flaws.

Perhaps I'm just stating the obvious here - horses for courses blah blah blah

Re: Scorcese - does anybody think 'Wolf of Wall Street' is a return to form? I saw 'Goodfellas' recently and to me 'Wolf of Wall Street' is a very similar film. Brilliantly directed, full of energy and excitement (despite being 3 hours long) and memorable performances... morally, essentially quite superficial, even hollow. It's that same thing of portraying a disreputable lifestyle so kinetically that you can't help but end up wishing you were the gangster/stockbroker, which is obviously not supposed to be the point. But, then, do people consider 'Goodfellas' one of Scorcece's great films? I suppose the best film I've seen by him is 'Taxi Driver', though 'Raging Bull' is up there.

Corpsey
17-02-2014, 10:33 AM
i used to hate wes anderson but have come round to his films since i saw darjeeling. hes a bit too obsessed with tone and style and look over all else -his films are basically like characters in little dollshouses - but hey, he is a great stylist.

of course, this could equally be applied to kubrick!

padraig (u.s.)
17-02-2014, 11:14 PM
in re Wes Anderson - the cloying tweeness, winking deadpan delivery, the stupid props (typewriters, rotary phones, encyclopedia sets, etc), Paul Simon soundtracks, etc are all irritating but forgivable. much less forgivable is the repeated use of non-white people as mute props and/or vehicles for white protagonists to further their emotional journeys, culminating in Darjeeling Ltd where India is a setting of strange/mute brown people in funny costumes for 3 cool white brothers to work out their emotional problems. and I'd actually dispute that he's ironic b/c for irony you need depth, multiple layers of meaning, which his work totally lacks. this is also where any comparison to Kubrick fails. both are stylists, true, but any Kubrick film is operating, successfully or not, on multiple psychological levels. unlike Anderson, there's something to parse underneath the style. I grant Rushmore is much better than the rest, I'd bet at least in part due to having autobiographical roots, which impart some heft to the usual relentless onslaught of whimsy.

in re Gallo - I think you're confusing commentary on narcissism w/actual narcissism, but again ymmv. I stick by what I said. Buffalo 66 is less stupid, if only b/c like Rushmore it has the autobiographical/origin story power going for it, a great cast besides Gallo and it harnesses - which I'm not sure English people can really get - the truly awesome pathos of not just Scott Norwood but the whole early 90s Jim Kelly/K-Gun Bills saga and Buffalo as a symbol. but ultimately Gallo is a much inferior Buscemi with better cheekbones and catty witticisms about other directors aside I doubt he has insights on anything besides how awesome Vincent Gallo is

rubberdingyrapids
17-02-2014, 11:25 PM
which is obviously not supposed to be the point

actually, i think that IS the point.

i often think directors/stars (eg dicaprio) just say things like 'its not a glorification!' to protect their own backs. but they secretly know that it is just that and know people will get off on that kind of vicarious thrill. basically theyre having their cake and eating it. or it could just be one of those things where its so hard to actually be critical of something when society prizes these values that theres no way that cant seep into the film youre making as a 'critique'. makes me think of sam fuller walking out of full metal jacket as he was offended at the patriotism when kubrick was supposedly trying to make it an anti war movie.

like, when i last saw apocalypse now, i never saw it as an anti war movie. i saw it as a romantic movie about soldiers.

re: wolf of wall street (which i still have to see), ive yet to meet a woman who liked it.

Corpsey
18-02-2014, 09:12 AM
in re Wes Anderson - the cloying tweeness, winking deadpan delivery, the stupid props (typewriters, rotary phones, encyclopedia sets, etc), Paul Simon soundtracks, etc are all irritating but forgivable. much less forgivable is the repeated use of non-white people as mute props and/or vehicles for white protagonists to further their emotional journeys, culminating in Darjeeling Ltd where India is a setting of strange/mute brown people in funny costumes for 3 cool white brothers to work out their emotional problems. and I'd actually dispute that he's ironic b/c for irony you need depth, multiple layers of meaning, which his work totally lacks. this is also where any comparison to Kubrick fails. both are stylists, true, but any Kubrick film is operating, successfully or not, on multiple psychological levels. unlike Anderson, there's something to parse underneath the style. I grant Rushmore is much better than the rest, I'd bet at least in part due to having autobiographical roots, which impart some heft to the usual relentless onslaught of whimsy.


This is interesting, I'd like to engage with this more when I'm not at work. I think I lack the tools, though, since I've not seen many Anderson films and I can't recall any of those that I have seen using non-white people in the way you've described. As for "irony" I was really more referring to the "winking deadpan" delivery than any deeper sense of irony - can irony not be superficial? Perhaps what Anderson's films are providing is a simulacrum of real irony, just as they provide a simulacrum of real humanity? Like I said, I'd have to see more Anderson films to usefully comment. Kubrick's films are suffused with irony - "Barry Lyndon", one of my favourite films ever, practically rests on what is left unsaid/unexpressed. I see it as an expression of deep emotion encased tragically in strict formal structures (societal strictures, echoed by the aesthetic of the film).

Interestingly it occurs to me that Kubrick rarely used 'non-white' people in his films. In my recollection, the exception is Scatman thingymabob in 'The Shining' and I presume there must be black soldiers in 'Full Metal Jacket'.

re: Wolf of Wall Street: There are plenty of indications in the film that we are supposed to view the protagonist and his mates as stupid, ignorant, racist, sexist, greedy, animalistic twats. Perhaps its a sort of triumph for the film to leave people like me so excited and tittillated by the luxurious lifestyle these twats leave, because it replicates the lure of capitalism that Belfort entices the gullible audience to his public speaking events with, even though they have full knowledge of his criminal conviction. There are numerous problems with the film, I think two are 1. not much exploration of the negative impact the greed of the 'wolves' has on ordinary (even ordinary RICH) people, thus encouraging us to see belfort and co's behaviour as deplorable but semi-harmless (as if they're going wild in a cage for our amusement) 2. jonah hill. He is funny in the film but I think this is an interesting casting choice because hill is part of a group of comedians who have taught audiences to root for losers/bastards.

padraig (u.s.)
20-02-2014, 06:03 PM
^Kumar Pallana as Mr. Littlejeans in Rushmore and, especially, as Pagoda in The RT. Seu Jorge in Life Aquatic, and also the nameless Asian pirates. Virtually every Indian person in Darjeeling. there's more but those are the most egregious examples. I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt on things like Max's girlfriend in Rushmore or Danny Glover in RT, which are at least somewhat articulated characters. I'm hardly the 1st person to make this observation and tbf, Anderson's hardly the 1st director to do this - not that that makes it OK - but he does it so blatantly and flippantly that it becomes even more irritating than your standard Hollywood recourse to the "Magical Negro" plot device. and just in general his films are set in a world of quirky, affected white people and their problems, around which exotic others orbit on the fringes to provide color (literally) and plot points. tbc this isn't a rigid demand for all characters of all colors to be equally developed in all films, more just a general rule for thinking about art (which is also how I use the Bechtel Test). and Anderson's not the worst person in the world or something, but inescapably the way he deals w/race really diminishes his work.

what I mean about irony is that for irony there has to be an original meaning that you're subverting. the deadpan in his films doesn't play against anything. it's just affectation. that isn't of itself a bad thing, it's just not irony.

padraig (u.s.)
20-02-2014, 06:19 PM
also, quickly on Kubrick - he mostly sticks to the characters in the source material. hence Scatman Crothers in The Shining is literally a Magic Negro - King is guilty of repeatedly using the trope in his work - but otoh you have the black gladiator in Spartacus who is arguably the most heroic character in the film. there are black marines in FMJ but I don't remember how well they correspond to the, iirc, single relatively major black character in the book. of course there is no Vietnamese POV represented but that's as the book - it's not a story about Vietnam but about Americans in relation to the war. also absence of people of color, which sometimes makes sense due to setting (i.e. Barry Lydon) and sometimes doesn't (I bet if he was making 2001 today the astronauts would be more diverse), is different from using them as props. not that Kubrick is perfect but it's not a good comparison, I think.

and let me once again make a plug for The Short-Timers (FMJ's source material) as much superior even to the film. there is also a possibly even better sequel, The Phantom Blooper in which Pvt Joker, among other things, is captured and then joins the Viet Cong. it's much rawer even than the 1st book, the most pain and bile filled account I've ever seen of the cancerous growth the war was on both the US and Vietnam. and unlike Short-Timers it's not just about Americans but the Vietnamese, thru Joker's deeply sympathetic POV. anyway, highly recommended.

IdleRich
21-02-2014, 08:47 AM
"re: wolf of wall street (which i still have to see), ive yet to meet a woman who liked it."
One of my friends loved it so much she went to see it twice.
As for me. It was alright, it passed the time and was never boring but it didn't really get involving at any point. I think that the story whizzed past too fast to really give you any sense of rise and then decline and fall. It wasn't as funny as I'd hoped it would be either although I did laugh a lot at the scene when they take loads of qualudes.
Agree the whole thing was very similar to Goodfellas but either it wasn't as good or I just don't enjoy those things as much any more. In fact I saw Goodfellas again at Christmas and it is simply more involving. You feel for him as he comes down cos you're invested in him coming up.

Corpsey
23-02-2014, 10:05 PM
I don't really feel any connection with Henry Hill in ''Goodfellas'', other than that created by Scorcese's technical wizardry. As far as I can recall, he never really shows himself to be anything other than greedy/ambitious.

I think its the FILM ITSELF I love with ''Goodfellas'', rather than any of the characters. Actually, that's not a bad thing given that the characters are all psychopathic murderers.

Leo
30-04-2014, 04:14 PM
the sad news about bob hoskins (rip) brought to mind a film from maybe the early/mid-2000s about a guy who's head of a UK mob crew, he's sort of an aging gangster trying to manage in the new world of crime organizations. while not an outright comedy, the film is sort of a gang-that-couldn't-shoot-straight tale.

can't think of the name of the film, thought i remembered hoskins in the lead role as mob boss but don't see anything like that on his IMDb.

anyone have a guess about what film i thinking of?