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HMGovt
16-10-2013, 07:05 PM
In no particular order

10. 9
9. c
8=. 1 & π
6. ½
5. 8 (yeah!)
4. 100
3. 2
2. 3
1. e

Leo
16-10-2013, 08:03 PM
i have some favorite numbers, many related to following sports as a kid. in no particular order:

714 (babe ruth career home runs)
63 (longest US football field goal by Saints' kicker Tom Dempsey, in yards)
7 (just like the way it looks, also number worn by Red Sox outfielder Reggie Smith)
12 (NY Jets' Joe Namath, as well as numerous other great quarterbacks)
666 (obvious)
69 (ditto)

HMGovt
16-10-2013, 08:13 PM
I have synaesthetic responses to some numbers

27 - beige yellow, slender
95 - round, red white and blue
8 - green, a postbox
12 - a coin spinning to a stop, increasing in frequency
9 - biting into a white bread and coal sandwich
38 - an overstuffed green leather badger

That kind of thing.

Leo
16-10-2013, 08:54 PM
i also like 9. as with 7, i like it visually, i like the balance of it.

but it also seems vaguely heroic, representing the last step before succumbing to all the multi-digit numbers. it's teetering on the edge, mindful of the threshold, the final holdout making the valiant last stand of the single digit tribe.

am i projecting?

HMGovt
16-10-2013, 09:29 PM
i also like 9. as with 7, i like it visually, i like the balance of it.

but it also seems vaguely heroic, representing the last step before succumbing to all the multi-digit numbers. it's teetering on the edge, mindful of the threshold, the final holdout making the valiant last stand of the single digit tribe.

am i projecting?

9 marks the end of a better time. 10 is wintry, a puddle by the kerb.

IdleRich
16-10-2013, 09:45 PM
n isn't a number is it?

sufi
17-10-2013, 12:04 AM
6174 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6174_(number)) Kaprekar's constant should probably be in the top 10

baboon2004
17-10-2013, 12:17 AM
We should have a top ten top ten.

A friend of mine once had a dream about him doing precisely this, which I think then regressed even further in a way that is unimaginable to the waking mind. I'm not sure he's been the same since.

Kaprekar's constant is remarkable, and making my mind ache.

Leo
17-10-2013, 01:20 AM
6174 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6174_(number)) Kaprekar's constant should probably be in the top 10

holy crap, that has to be #1 in the top 10.

muser
17-10-2013, 04:09 AM
it sounds a lot like cellular automata with iterations leading to oscillating patterns and non-moving patterns.

HMGovt
17-10-2013, 11:43 AM
n isn't a number is it?

it's pi but doesn't show up very well in this font

Mr. Tea
17-10-2013, 12:24 PM
i (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imaginary_unit)

Slothrop
17-10-2013, 12:32 PM
i and 1729 (the Ramanujan taxicab number) definitely need to be in there...

Also Graham's number, which is (or used to be) the largest number ever used in a serious mathematical proof. The observable universe is far too small to contain a digital representation of it, even if the size of each digit goes down to the Planck length. The discoverer pretty much had to invent a new system of notation just to write it down. It was, at the time, the best proveable upper bound on the possible values of a quantity in graph theory for which no-one has yet found a concrete example greater than 13.

IdleRich
17-10-2013, 01:08 PM
You can't beat 6 - it's perfect!

Mr. Tea
17-10-2013, 02:02 PM
You can't beat 6 - it's perfect!

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Wx6HJkrHLMU/T2f_itvQlPI/AAAAAAAAAec/pYNzOdo7SRU/s1600/ava-smack.gif

woops
17-10-2013, 03:38 PM
If you like 666 you may be interested to know the A666 runs through Blackburn.
888 is the number of Man. Never really understood that though.
555 is a lucky number in China I'm told.

Slothrop
17-10-2013, 03:46 PM
And if the Devil is six the God is seven etc.

baboon2004
17-10-2013, 03:52 PM
808 is a pretty good number, musically speaking

Mr. Tea
17-10-2013, 04:25 PM
I want to see some love for the square root of minus one

You might have missed my post, it was pretty mnml.

Is it true that buildings in China often have a floor '3a' (or the equivalent) because the words for 'four' and 'death' sound very similar? Or is just one of those things people say and everyone assumes it's true?

I'm quite partial to the Euler–Mascheroni constant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%E2%80%93Mascheroni_constant).

Slothrop
17-10-2013, 04:41 PM
Has anyone suggested 5318008?

baboon2004
17-10-2013, 04:53 PM
In Japan, 'shi' is the word for both 4 and death. Didn't know it applied to China too, but...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetraphobia

Mr. Tea
17-10-2013, 05:11 PM
Has anyone suggested 5318008?

Heh.

I saw a guy in the canteen at lunch today who had a load of mathematical tattoos, I mean nested fractions, digits of pi, some diagrams that looked like they'd been drawn in Mathematica, all that. I thought, I bet he's got a favourite number. Several, probably.

boardsy
18-10-2013, 10:55 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiKcd7yPLdU

boardsy
18-10-2013, 10:59 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7iSKMPSwcY

Mr. Tea
18-10-2013, 11:08 AM
In Japan, 'shi' is the word for both 4 and death. Didn't know it applied to China too, but...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetraphobia

I would guess maybe it started in China and then spread to other countries in E/SE Asia.

Even in certain parts of Europe it has a viersome reputation...

viktorvaughn
18-10-2013, 09:20 PM
I would guess maybe it started in China and then spread to other countries in E/SE Asia.

Even in certain parts of Europe it has a viersome reputation...

Some record labels miss 13 out of their sequences too i seem to recall

HMGovt
18-10-2013, 10:37 PM
http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2013/10/16/piraha_cognitive_anumeracy_in_a_language_without_n umbers.html

Among Pirahã's many peculiarities is an almost complete lack of numeracy, an extremely rare linguistic trait of which there are only a few documented cases. The language contains no words at all for discrete numbers and only three that approximate some notion of quantity—hói, a "small size or amount," hoí, a "somewhat larger size or amount," and baágiso, which can mean either to "cause to come together" or "a bunch."
...
The Pirahã consider all forms of human discourse other than their own to be laughably inferior, and they are unique among Amazonian peoples in remaining monolingual.

@hmgovt (https://twitter.com/hmgovt)

woops
23-10-2013, 09:07 AM
You might have missed my post, it was pretty mnml.[/URL].

I thought I'd imagined it.

There was no number 13 on the street where I grew up.
555 is a lucky number in China, hence the cigarette brand

Mr. Tea
23-10-2013, 09:20 AM
http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2013/10/16/piraha_cognitive_anumeracy_in_a_language_without_n umbers.html

Among Pirahã's many peculiarities is an almost complete lack of numeracy, an extremely rare linguistic trait of which there are only a few documented cases. The language contains no words at all for discrete numbers and only three that approximate some notion of quantity—hói, a "small size or amount," hoí, a "somewhat larger size or amount," and baágiso, which can mean either to "cause to come together" or "a bunch."
...
The Pirahã consider all forms of human discourse other than their own to be laughably inferior, and they are unique among Amazonian peoples in remaining monolingual.


Haha, like Discworld trolls, whose counting system goes "one, two, many, lots".

IdleRich
23-10-2013, 12:48 PM
I remember reading those Littlenose books when I was little and their counting went "One, two, plenty" - they were cavemen I think.

Edit - close http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Grant_(children%27s_author)

mistersloane
23-10-2013, 10:50 PM
sorry, it's 5318008, and this is why

http://youtu.be/RyFr279K9TE

empty mirror
15-01-2014, 11:13 AM
http://31.media.tumblr.com/93c705c0bf82a682bf149c5c7a573bea/tumblr_mgox1usjSs1rq7hhuo1_400.gif