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View Full Version : Google's neural networks see things that aren't there - awesome computer acid art



Mr. Tea
18-06-2015, 09:35 PM
I'm sure a few of you must have seen this already - could just as easily have gone in Art or Thought, but anyway:

http://googleresearch.blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/inceptionism-going-deeper-into-neural.html

Basically Google researchers have used neural net programs trained to pick out certain features, such as animal faces or buildings, and put them to work on an image containing none of these things in conjunction with an algorith to gradually turn parts of the image that look a tiny bit like the sought image into that image, and then iterated it many times. The results are incredible:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XZ0i0zXOhQk/VYIXdyIL9kI/AAAAAAAAAmQ/UbA6j41w28o/s1600/building-dreams.png

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-FPDgxlc-WPU/VYIV1bK50HI/AAAAAAAAAlw/YIwOPjoulcs/s1600/skyarrow.png

What I find amazing is how incredibly similar they look to some of the stuff you see when you're tripping. In fact it seems to back up a hunch I've had for some time: that a lot of the visual effects of psychedelics arise because they turn up to 11 the circuits in your brain that deal with pattern recognition and detecting streams of meaning in otherwise noisy signals, like how the random dirt on the wall in a nightclub toilet suddenly appears to be alive with slowly morphing faces.

Cool stuff happens even when they just train the program to pick out and exaggerate edges:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-PK_bEYY91cw/VYIVBYw63uI/AAAAAAAAAlo/iUsA4leua10/s1600/seurat-layout.png

droid
18-06-2015, 10:39 PM
What I find amazing is how incredibly similar they look to some of the stuff you see when you're tripping. In fact it seems to back up a hunch I've had for some time: that a lot of the visual effects of psychedelics arise because they turn up to 11 the circuits in your brain that deal with pattern recognition and detecting streams of meaning in otherwise noisy signals, like how the random dirt on the wall in a nightclub toilet suddenly appears to be alive with slowly morphing faces.


Thats well known isnt it? A combination of the that and entoptic phenomenon.


http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-PK_bEYY91cw/VYIVBYw63uI/AAAAAAAAAlo/iUsA4leua10/s1600/seurat-layout.png

All good stuff, though the Seurat is easy pickings if youre looking for edges.

Mr. Tea
18-06-2015, 10:45 PM
Thats well known isnt it? A combination of the that and entoptic phenomenon.

Is it? I mean it may seem subjectively obvious to anyone who's taken psychs, but I have no idea if this was just a widely-held hunch or is well supported by neuroscience.


All good stuff, though the Seurat is easy pickings if youre looking for edges.

Damn droid, you're a hard man to impress!

I wonder what would happen if you fed the program an Alex Grey painting? Maybe it'd turn it into a photo from a Next catalogue.

droid
18-06-2015, 11:37 PM
Yeah 'enhanced pattern recognition' is a factor. Check out the wonderfully titled: 'Geometric visual hallucinations, Euclidean symmetry and the functional architecture of striate cortex' for more info: http://www.math.utah.edu/~bresslof/publications/01-1.pdf

Mr. Tea
19-06-2015, 09:04 AM
'Geometric visual hallucinations, Euclidean symmetry and the functional architecture of striate cortex

I am SO in the wrong job...

luka
19-06-2015, 01:44 PM
I've never had a hallucination I feel cheated I want my world to be an Alex grey painting

Mr. Tea
19-06-2015, 02:11 PM
I've never had a hallucination I feel cheated I want my world to be an Alex grey painting

I call bullshit, your brain can't be that different from everyone else's.

Mr. Tea
19-06-2015, 02:17 PM
To paraphrase Hunter S. Thompson, "Where're all these acid flashbacks I was promised?"

luka
19-06-2015, 07:58 PM
Just profoundly unvisual person

luka
19-06-2015, 07:59 PM
Huxley talks about this so I know I'm not unique

HMGovt
20-06-2015, 07:30 AM
Yeah 'enhanced pattern recognition' is a factor. Check out the wonderfully titled: 'Geometric visual hallucinations, Euclidean symmetry and the functional architecture of striate cortex' for more info: http://www.math.utah.edu/~bresslof/publications/01-1.pdf

Interesting paper, but it's surely a major oversight not to discuss or quantify the apparent fractal nature of geometric hallucinations?

Mr. Tea
20-06-2015, 01:33 PM
Just profoundly unvisual person

Oh don't tell me, you hallucinate in qautrains or haikus or something.

luka
20-06-2015, 06:50 PM
Not sure why you're so upset about it? Pls explain

Mr. Tea
21-06-2015, 01:06 PM
Hardly upset, just slightly amused and commenting on the fact that you're obviously a highly verbal/textual/lyrical person.

luka
21-06-2015, 02:18 PM
Oh, I thought it was a personal attack

droid
21-06-2015, 03:33 PM
I've never had a hallucination I feel cheated I want my world to be an Alex grey painting

Drop some 25x nBOME and you'll be begging for the hallucinations to stop. Begging.

luka
21-06-2015, 04:06 PM
Don't do any of that any more tbh

Mr. Tea
21-06-2015, 09:26 PM
Interesting paper, but it's surely a major oversight not to discuss or quantify the apparent fractal nature of geometric hallucinations?

You know, I'm not entirely convinced the apparent similarity between fractals and some of the form constants seen while tripping isn't a coincidence. Or rather, if it's not a coincidence, if the causality is the obvious way around.

Consider that 'fractals', as the public understands them (representations of the Mandelbrot and Julia sets with a very garish colour scheme chosen) started becoming well known in the late 80s/early 90s thanks in large part to James Gleick's Chaos. In other words, exactly the time acid house and rave culture were kicking off, ecstasy was becoming the club/party drug of choice and there was also a resurgence in the use of LSD.

So I'm wondering if people making images of certain fractals were inspired to use colour schemes that gave 'trippy' results, rather than there being something inherently fractal about the patterns you can see when you're tripping.

HMGovt
22-06-2015, 12:03 PM
Possibly, but it's been established in the past decade that the neuronal organisation within the brain is fractal. This paper pre-dated that though, so fair enough. Neuronal architecture is self-similar on many, many levels, ranging from dendritic branching to distribution of relative voids in the grey matter. So it's not much of a stretch to speculate that geometric hallucinations owe some of their repeating aspects to fractal patterns.

Mr. Tea
22-06-2015, 02:13 PM
That's an intriguing possibility.

I wonder if Roger Penrose is aware of that paper droid posted above, and what he made of it if so.

Benny B
25-06-2015, 11:07 AM
http://www.twitch.tv/317070

slowtrain
14-07-2015, 02:18 AM
Drop some 25x nBOME and you'll be begging for the hallucinations to stop. Begging.

Hideous stuff - found it speedy and didn't have any visuals until I was trying to go to sleep. So yes actually I guess I was begging, because I was dead tired and I had a headache.

droid
14-07-2015, 10:10 AM
I think it depends on the variations, and of course you never know what it is youre actually taking - I certainly didnt. But the classic nBome trip is blinding open and closed eye hallucinations lasting 12-24 hours.

Horrible stuff. Makes LSD seem like a gentle back massage.

slowtrain
20-07-2015, 07:21 AM
I think it depends on the variations, and of course you never know what it is youre actually taking - I certainly didnt. But the classic nBome trip is blinding open and closed eye hallucinations lasting 12-24 hours.

Horrible stuff. Makes LSD seem like a gentle back massage.

It was 'I' iirc