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View Full Version : Where do you guys get your news from?



baboon2004
21-07-2015, 03:15 PM
Interested to know - I'm looking primarily for sites with a mix of news and opinion, on the left wing side of things ideally. Anything beyond the obvious major newspapers please

luka
21-07-2015, 03:34 PM
Twitter. That's all really.

Mr. Tea
21-07-2015, 06:11 PM
"Reading" and "watching" the "news" is for chumps. I just have a 24-hour live feed from objective material reality jacked straight into my cerebral cortex. That way I can call everyone I debate with brainwashed, misinformed sheeple, regardless of whether their news source is the BBC, Fox, the Morning Star, Press TV, Al-Jaz, infowars.com or whatever.

[in b4 luka]

griftert
21-07-2015, 07:15 PM
Watching BBC News is like watching a bad parody of a dystopian future world.

I think they should just have a channel to cover all the brutal crime and such like, seeing as it makes up such a large portion of what the news covers. I tend to avoid the news now as I don't want to hear any more about it. There's a tendency in popular culture I find weird and prurient.

Also, I don't like seeing snuff movies and that seems to be standard fair these days*

*as long as they're not white people.

If anything really important is happening I can find out about it later on when people have a better idea of what actually went on. 'Scary man do somefing somewhere' is not useful information for me I don't think.

I would read the Guardian but I haven't been looking so much recently and I'm glad of it. It's almost all absolute nonsense. Journalism as a real, purposeful profession basically doesn't exist any more.

trza
21-07-2015, 08:27 PM
Its important to only pay attention to sources of news that you agree with. Build a list of people to follow who all have the same worldview as yourself. Make the internet your happy place. Then get upset when someone shares something that makes you unhappy.

baboon2004
22-07-2015, 02:24 PM
Its important to only pay attention to sources of news that you agree with. Build a list of people to follow who all have the same worldview as yourself. Make the internet your happy place. Then get upset when someone shares something that makes you unhappy.

obvs not this way of consuming news, but on the other hand there is a limit to how much mainstream media shite one can tolerate, especially on issues that involve, y'know, critiquing systems of power and other such complex stuff. It's important to be inspired sometimes as well as outraged.

baboon2004
22-07-2015, 02:29 PM
I would read the Guardian but I haven't been looking so much recently and I'm glad of it. It's almost all absolute nonsense. Journalism as a real, purposeful profession basically doesn't exist any more.

I know what you're saying, but would have to disagree with the conclusion, at least in one interpretation of it. There are definitely lots of great journalists out there, and journalism is evolving with technology (eg Bellingcat and the 'new' citizen journalism - it's not business as usual); it's just that most of these people are surviving on a pittance because the major papers are run by risk-averse editors who would rather ambulance-chase (in the global scheme of things, publish only hashtag stories, with as much blood and as little real explanation as possible). Great journalism still exists as a profession, but an under-resourced and brutal one, I think.

http://www.cjr.org/feature/womans_work.php whatever you think of her and the piece, it's an interesting takedown of the profession as it stands.

baboon2004
22-07-2015, 02:30 PM
Watching BBC News is like watching a bad parody of a dystopian future world.

I think they should just have a channel to cover all the brutal crime and such like, seeing as it makes up such a large portion of what the news covers. I tend to avoid the news now as I don't want to hear any more about it. There's a tendency in popular culture I find weird and prurient.

Also, I don't like seeing snuff movies and that seems to be standard fair these days*

*as long as they're not white people.


def agree with all this

craner
22-07-2015, 03:02 PM
Bellingcat

This guy has done some amazing work, it is true.

craner
22-07-2015, 03:27 PM
the major papers are run by risk-averse editors

Also, they don't have enough money.

This has had a signifcantly negative and dangerous effect on foreign correspondants, a now almost fully freelance extistence becoming more precarious by the year. Two of the most interesting articles on this I have read in recnent years, one on James Foley (http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/08/my-long-correspondence-with-jim-foley/379194/)and this one by Italian freelancer Francesca Bossi (http://www.cjr.org/feature/womans_work.php?page=all).

baboon2004
22-07-2015, 03:37 PM
francesca borri - the link i put above is to an article from her

edit: same article in fact :)

$70 a piece?!?

craner
22-07-2015, 03:38 PM
Ha ha, great minds, etc

baboon2004
22-07-2015, 04:09 PM
is she talking about the Guardian editor in the piece? ( She certainly posted a fair few pieces for them from Syria) not sure if their identity is common knowledge or not

ok just checked - she worked less than i thought for the guardian

craner
22-07-2015, 04:13 PM
I thought it was an Italian editor. I don't know that much about her, I just remember being startled by the article. It took me a while to find it again, I was having to do Google searches with words like "Syria" "freelance" "Italian" "woman" "danger" and that sort of thing. To think I could have just followed your link!

baboon2004
22-07-2015, 04:54 PM
the righteous path is often in front of one's eyes, or something

the article startled me too - rare to see someone being so honest, especially in a professional context, I think. The editor doesn't come off well, and neither does Clara. And what follows is pretty eye-opening.

Though my girlfriend was less impressed, as her father was involved in a very similar field as Borri - she's heard a lot of the bravado (disguised bravado, but bravado nonetheless) too often before.

craner
22-07-2015, 05:30 PM
Yeah, I guess you have to factor in a lot of self-promotion with these guys, there is as much egoism as altruism in their psychological make-up.

baboon2004
22-07-2015, 06:57 PM
really difficult to tell. but one thing's for sure - international journalists can (in all but extreme circumstances) leave the region of danger, whereas the people they're writing about usually can't. also depends on who else in the person's life as well - if there's no-one dependent upon them, then it's more straightforward

mistersloane
23-07-2015, 08:18 AM
Irish Times is quite good as an alternative to the Guardian.

droid
23-07-2015, 10:23 AM
Irish Times is quite good as an alternative to the Guardian.

Dont go there!

vimothy
24-07-2015, 12:49 PM
Like music, journalism did not survive.

Woebot
25-07-2015, 02:48 PM
whatever you think of her and the piece, it's an interesting takedown of the profession as it stands.don't think i've ever read anything so ghastly. an extraordinary mix of righteousness and self-indulgence. the radiohead namecheck was particularly illuminating.


news=entertainment

griftert
27-07-2015, 01:55 PM
But they buy your article anyway, even if they would never buy the Nike soccer ball handmade by a Pakistani child.Who wouldn't buy that soccer ball??

griftert
27-07-2015, 02:03 PM
I think it's pretty self righteous to call that piece righteous.

luka
27-07-2015, 02:29 PM
I thought it was a curious response to the article but if challenged I very much doubt woebot will Stand by it

Woebot
28-07-2015, 06:04 PM
I think it's pretty self righteous to call that piece righteous.

i think it's pretty self righteous of you of to tell me i'm being self-righteous.

we could do this for days.

Woebot
28-07-2015, 07:00 PM
I thought it was a curious response to the article but if challenged I very much doubt woebot will Stand by it

strangely one doesn't have to look far to read another "curious response" (does "curious" mean "critical" or nothing very precise?)


the righteous path is often in front of one's eyes, or something

the article startled me too - rare to see someone being so honest, especially in a professional context, I think. The editor doesn't come off well, and neither does Clara. And what follows is pretty eye-opening.

Though my girlfriend was less impressed, as her father was involved in a very similar field as Borri - she's heard a lot of the bravado (disguised bravado, but bravado nonetheless) too often before.

but to take just one single example from the piece to explain why i thought "righteous" was apposite:


there is the Japanese tourist who is on the frontlines, because he says he needs two weeks of “thrills”; the Swedish law-school graduate who came to collect evidence of war crimes;

why is this lady any different from these "nuts". she implies she is.

looking forward to you trolling me again sometime soon luke. thanks.

griftert
28-07-2015, 08:09 PM
Yeh I think that's a good point. I didn't think it was obvious that she was any different. I guess I'm just more willing to give nutcases some sort of moral legitimacy I guess. There sounds like the makings of an interesting novel there though.

trza
28-07-2015, 08:21 PM
what article are you guys talking about

luka
28-07-2015, 09:58 PM
Im not trolling Matthew.
I thought your response was curious partly for its substance but also because it was so wildly over the top and intemperate.
I doubted you would stand by it as it seemed to be an spontaneous expression of some other deeper, private emotion rather than a considered response to the article itself.
Perhaps that was wrong and you were feeling happy and contented at the time you made the comment and just really genuinely hated that woman

baboon2004
28-07-2015, 11:32 PM
I think it's clear that anyone reporting from a war zone is not doing it totally out of altruism, and that there is a lot else going on. But should they be pilloried for this, given that 'lot else going on' is likely often be the (doomed, I'd say) attempt to resolve personal trauma in some way. And if they're at least trying to explain what's happening to a wider audience, rather than going for thrills and not producing anything useful. Or is what they produce always going to be prejudicial and myopic anyways?

I'm just reading the Patrick Cockburn book on ISIS and other Sunni radicalism - given that I know v little about Syria (and that so much news from the country seems to have been quickly contradicted by other sources, and then overwritten by a new conventional wisdom), I am finding it interesting. But again, quite a few asides about the times he was almost killed, doing things that it's not clear were absolutely necessary.

@trza - http://www.cjr.org/feature/womans_work.php