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droid
29-07-2015, 11:48 PM
OK, Im looking for life changing and/or random events that had a major influence on the personal lives of musicians and/or the history of music - a couple of examples:

Geno Washington turning up at a party with a couple of Ian Brown's mates, and convincing Brown that he had what it took to be a rock star. Apparently it was Washington's enthusiasm that convinced Brown to join the band.

http://louderthanwar.com/night-ian-brown-met-geno-washington/

Neil Young driving his hearse around LA and just happening to drive past Stephen Stills and Richie Furay, going on to form Buffalo Springfield and... well the rest is history.

Glyn Johns being made head chorister at the age of 11 at his local church.

Eno attending a lecture by Pete Townshend about the use of tape machines by non-musicians in 1969.

Tim Smith giving Dizzee his first cubase assignment, or rather, Langdon Park school benefitting from free cast off computers from Canary Wharf companies: http://www.theguardian.com/music/2003/sep/21/urban.dizzeerascal

The more random the better.

CrowleyHead
30-07-2015, 01:43 PM
Microscopic, but YG was originally just gangbanging, but he came to prominence as a rapper and dancer in the jerk movement because his little brother started dancing and he wanted to support him to encourage him to stay away from banging. Its mentioned in a documentary on Jerk somewhere on youtube.

PiLhead
30-07-2015, 09:05 PM
the accidental meetings that led to band formations and therefore could easily have not happened, these seem the most counter-factual generative - like Sioux and Severin meeting at the Roxy concert at Wembley

but others - seems fairly likely that Eno would have come across other things that would have shown the creative potential of tape machine - ian brown probably had enough of dormant ego that something would have fanned it enough to become a lead singer - maybe not that band at that juncture though

Benny B
30-07-2015, 09:34 PM
Obv he was allready an accomplished musician but i always found the story of robert wyatts accident before making rock bottom (and getting married) very moving and inspirational.

droid
30-07-2015, 10:13 PM
the accidental meetings that led to band formations and therefore could easily have not happened, these seem the most counter-factual generative - like Sioux and Severin meeting at the Roxy concert at Wembley

but others - seems fairly likely that Eno would have come across other things that would have shown the creative potential of tape machine - ian brown probably had enough of dormant ego that something would have fanned it enough to become a lead singer - maybe not that band at that juncture though

Ha yes, sure, although the Washington encounter seemed to have made an enormous impact on Brown, and who knows... Eno says that was the moment he realised he could be a musician.

The band formation thing is an angle alright, if you look at classified ads alone - without the independent music press and fanzine scene in the UK & US, there'd be no Smiths, no Metallica, no....MOTLEY CRUE!

droid
30-07-2015, 10:15 PM
Obv he was already an accomplished musician but i always found the story of robert wyatts accident before making rock bottom (and getting married) very moving and inspirational.

Absolutely - its kind of a despite rather than a because though - or maybe a mix of both?

droid
30-07-2015, 10:26 PM
the accidental meetings that led to band formations and therefore could easily have not happened, these seem the most counter-factual generative - like Sioux and Severin meeting at the Roxy concert at Wembley

Thats a good one, there must be tons more... but I guess once a band like Roxy existed, it was inevitable it would attract like minded people.

PiLhead
31-07-2015, 12:07 AM
what would Sabbath have sounded like if Tony Iommi hadn't injured his hand in the factory accident? more conventional, less heavy?

seem to recall there was some contingent peculiarity to do with how Peter Hook developed his bass style - it was a really cheap, or defective instrument, and he had to play it more like a baritone guitar. he learned to play it the wrong way, and by the time he realised, it was too late - something like that. sorry, the full memory is eluding me and i can't be arsed to look for his memoir.

PiLhead
31-07-2015, 12:12 AM
well, Dylan's motorbike accident is a classic pivot

i don't really care enough about Dylan to be able to speculate, but obviously if he'd died, or been paralysed, then that would have been curtains on any later recording career

on the other hand if he'd been less injured - broken neck i think it was - then maybe he would not have done the whole retreat from it all, back to rootsy / simple music, woodshedding with The Band etc - which was enormously influential in terms of redirecting rock away from psychedelic excess and back to its roots

still i think i've read that the accident was more or less his excuse to retreat, something he wanted/needed to do anyway

CrowleyHead
31-07-2015, 12:17 AM
Neil Young's son is born with cerebral palsy and he has to learn to communicate with him via computer technology, hence Re-Act-or

droid
31-07-2015, 10:04 AM
The Dylan thing, I think, has been overstated. As you say, I reckon it was an excuse to become a recluse more than anything else.

I guess Im really looking for positive events... if you had the power to influence things, would you damage a promising guitarists hand in an accident? Knock a folk rock superstar off his motorbike at the height of his fame? Throw an accomplished drummer out of a window? I think the outcomes would be far too uncertain.

That said, this is all great stuff, thanks. And to add another morbid one - Michael Jacksons Pepsi hair fire. Precipitated a downward spiral of addiction and depression and plastic surgery obsession.


Neil Young's son is born with cerebral palsy and he has to learn to communicate with him via computer technology, hence Re-Act-or

Thats one that was bad for everybody.

CrowleyHead
31-07-2015, 03:22 PM
Disagree but w/e.

Another one is Johnny Thunders getting himself on Gimme Shelter in the crowd of a Stones show, and then watching himself on the screen dozens of times swearing it wouldn't be the last time or something like that.

sufi
31-07-2015, 03:54 PM
TE Lawrence was on his way to meet with the British Union of Fascists, with a view to assuming leadership when he fell off his bike...

droid
31-07-2015, 04:32 PM
Ha. Thinking big. I like it.

droid
31-07-2015, 04:40 PM
Without slavery there would be no Western rock/pop canon. The blood and violence of colonisation, displacement, deprivation and mass migration provides the most fertile ground for musical innovation & development.

sufi
31-07-2015, 05:33 PM
Without slavery there would be no Western rock/pop canon. The blood and violence of colonisation, displacement, deprivation and mass migration provides the most fertile ground for musical innovation & development.http://perlbal.hi-pi.com/blog-images/624103/gd/13136014684/Joaozinho-Orando.jpg

mistersloane
31-07-2015, 05:39 PM
Michael Jacksons Pepsi hair fire. Precipitated a downward spiral of addiction and depression and plastic surgery obsession.


I don't agree. I think it was the moment he attained enlightenment - he literally BECAME the lightning flash, that was the problem - and from there on in, everything he did was an attempt to explicate the moment of enlightenment he'd had, when he became a walking matchstick.

Glacial 718
31-07-2015, 08:55 PM
Eno getting hit by a taxi -> being unable to turn up the volume on quiet music recordings while bedridden in hospital -> his ambient works

droid
31-07-2015, 09:36 PM
Yeah, I think thats the obvious Eno one. Figure it might be worth the risk to hit him with a cab in return for 'on land'.

PiLhead
01-08-2015, 01:36 AM
that's a killer one, the Eno

however i think it's actually three concatenated or sequential pivots - there's the accident (and him not being killed, which would open up a whole other counterfactual universe - no Remain in Light, no U2 imperial phase, no Low/Heroes/Lodger etc), but also the fact that some fuckwit broke the stereo in the hospital (it was also i think that one speaker was bust as well) and another left the volume turned so low, and also that Judy Nylon came round not just with a bunch of grapes and some flowers but an album of harp music i think it was. If she'd brought him an album of calypso or some rousing brass band music I don't think ambient would necessarily have resulted, even at semi-inaudible levels.

droid
02-08-2015, 11:43 PM
The unusually hot Jamaican summer of 1966 which (by some accounts) led to the slowing down of ska because people couldn't dance to the faster tempo. In comes rocksteady, the foregrounding of bass and the foundation of most of the sonic template of reggae.

Ruddy Redwood famously getting his hands on a mysterious vocal free Paragons tape at Duke Reid's and pressing it to acetate for his sound system, thus inventing the version, dub, & the remix.

mistersloane
03-08-2015, 08:54 AM
Ruddy Redwood famously getting his hands on a mysterious vocal free Paragons tape at Duke Reid's and pressing it to acetate for his sound system, thus inventing the version, dub, & the remix.

Yeah that's probably the best accident in history.

droid
18-08-2015, 11:03 PM
Queen's debut performance on TOTP, made possible by the promo for 'Rebel Rebel' not turning up on time.

The Sex Pistols appearing on Bill Grundy's show only because Queen pulled out at the last minute.

Mr. Tea
18-08-2015, 11:08 PM
The Sex Pistols appearing on Bill Grundy's show only because Queen pulled out at the last minute.

Ooh, I've got a good Pistols one - Malcolm McLaren 'discovering' a young Johnny Rotten because the latter was wearing a Pink Floyd T-shirt with "I HATE" crudely scrawled above the name of the band in black marker pen.

Possibly apocryphal but Google Images show the part about the T-shirt is true, at least.

baboon2004
19-08-2015, 02:58 PM
whoever it was in mid-80s Chicago who started messing around with the settings of an old Roland bass accompaniment synth probably deserves a mention here

Mr. Tea
19-08-2015, 03:31 PM
whoever it was in mid-80s Chicago who started messing around with the settings of an old Roland bass accompaniment synth probably deserves a mention here

Yes, that's surely the best 'accidental instrument discovery' ever.

PiLhead
20-08-2015, 08:51 PM
Another Eno one

Roxy are forming around Bryan Ferry, Graham Simpson on bass, and Andy Mackay

Andy M has known Eno for a couple of years (through doing John Cage-ish type events at various colleges, one of which performances Eno witnessed and they got chatting)

however he hasn't seen him for a while

and then runs into him on the Tube

Eno: "I was getting on a train, on the Northern Line, and there was a choice between one carriage and the next. I got in and bumped into Andy Mackay. If I'd got into the other one, I wouldn't have joined Roxy Music, and I probably would have had a completely different life".

Mr. Tea
20-08-2015, 09:12 PM
Eno: "I was getting on a train, on the Northern Line, and there was a choice between one carriage and the next. I got in and bumped into Andy Mackay. If I'd got into the other one, I wouldn't have joined Roxy Music, and I probably would have had a completely different life".

That's a good one. I like that it involves someone as extraordinary as Brian Eno and something as prosaic as the Northern Line.

droid
21-08-2015, 09:53 AM
Eno: "I was getting on a train, on the Northern Line, and there was a choice between one carriage and the next. I got in and bumped into Andy Mackay. If I'd got into the other one, I wouldn't have joined Roxy Music, and I probably would have had a completely different life".

Nice. I think Im gonna have to read the Eno bio again.

droid
10-09-2015, 11:41 PM
Dec 9, 1914. Edison's factory in New Jersey burns down. The only company he can find to manufacture his cabinets is the Wisconsin Chair Company who get the equipment need to manufacture records as part of the deal.

The company goes on to found paramount records and start pressing novelty records in order to promote the cabinets, leading to the label becoming one of the leading producer of race records, and then the premier exponent of delta blues in the 30's - a direct influence on skiffle, which was ground zero for the British invasion and British rock of the 60's & 70's.

Diggedy Derek
04-11-2015, 01:59 PM
Top thread

Some of these 'meeting someone at a gig' ones are slippery though - meeting new people in public by necessity has a random element to it, and we'll never know what might have happened if they didn't meet that person, and instead met someone else

I'm going to throw in Omar Souleyman's frantic banger "Leh Jani" becoming a massive YouTube hit and kicking of his worldwide career – a track that only ended up that speed because the tape duplication factories in Syria are so dirty, dusty and unreliable so it ended up pitched up ~16%.

nomos
04-11-2015, 02:18 PM
There's the legend of the 1977 NYC blackout...
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_eye/2014/10/16/roman_mars_99_percent_invisible_was_the_1977_nyc_w ide_blackout_a_catalyst.html


On July 13, 1977, lightning struck an electricity transmission line in New York City, causing the line’s automatic circuit breaker to kick in. The electricity from the affected line was diverted to another line. This was fairly normal, and everything was fine—until a second bolt of lightning struck. Electric lines started turning themselves off. As more and more lines failed, the whole system faltered. Eventually, the largest power generator in the area, known as Big Allis, shut down.


New York was in the middle of a citywide blackout—with power failing in all five boroughs—and pretty soon, things started to get tense. As Caz recalls, “The stores started to close. Like the local bodegas on each corner—we would hear the gates slamming down. It was like they knew what was happening, they knew what was going on, they was like, ‘We closing up now.’ ”


Caz also believes that the 1977 blackout may have accelerated the growing hip-hop movement, which was just beginning to put down roots in the Bronx. His theory: The looting that occurred during the blackout enabled people who couldn’t afford turntables and mixers to become DJs

droid
04-11-2015, 02:40 PM
Ha. yes, thank you both.


Some of these 'meeting someone at a gig' ones are slippery though - meeting new people in public by necessity has a random element to it, and we'll never know what might have happened if they didn't meet that person, and instead met someone else

Yeah, I agree, what's more crucial would be the factors that led up to that gig happening.

droid
04-11-2015, 02:47 PM
So much of this stuff is ungoogleable. Ive been combing through bios and books about music for stuff and wishing Id made more notes over the last 15 yrs of reading.

Im convinced there's something juicy to be had from Sun-Ra's undescended testicle.

nomos
04-11-2015, 03:11 PM
Im convinced there's something juicy to be had from Sun-Ra's undescended testicle.
Whole worlds!

Diggedy Derek
04-11-2015, 03:32 PM
There are several things that might have been crucial in the Sun Ra story – and I suppose the testicle could have been important in more than one way! Firstly, he seems to have had relatively little sexual intimacy in his life, and you could certainly read that as somehow connected with the whole "I did not come from this earth" thing. More prosaically, and I think maybe more importantly, I wonder how much his health issues and that chronic hernia problem might have created a desperate need for escape.

Diggedy Derek
04-11-2015, 03:33 PM
Nomos – that DJ/looting one is a cracking theory!

nomos
04-11-2015, 03:49 PM
There are several things that might have been crucial in the Sun Ra story – and I suppose the testicle could have been important in more than one way! Firstly, he seems to have had relatively little sexual intimacy in his life, and you could certainly read that as somehow connected with the whole "I did not come from this earth" thing. More prosaically, and I think maybe more importantly, I wonder how much his health issues and that chronic hernia problem might have created a desperate need for escape.
Yup. And isolationism, his army discharge, even reinforcement of his neoplatonist disgust with the physical body and admonitions against Arkestra members having sex. Then there was the insomnia. Lots of time to read and think.

nomos
04-11-2015, 03:51 PM
The lightning/blackout story would have made for an excellent Bambaataa video.

http://d4f1ndlb0hkjb.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Lee-WS-Amp-81-MCooper-e1380221636712-620x515.jpg

trza
04-11-2015, 04:55 PM
what about hurricanes or earthquakes?

Sectionfive
05-11-2015, 09:52 PM
There's the legend of the 1977 NYC blackout...
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_eye/2014/10/16/roman_mars_99_percent_invisible_was_the_1977_nyc_w ide_blackout_a_catalyst.html

As immortalised here http://boingboing.net/2012/01/17/brain-rot-hip-hop-family-tree-2.html

What else? Tom Moulton needing a promo cut on Friday evening but the engineer was all out of blank 7' so they put it on a 12' acetate.

droid
05-11-2015, 10:05 PM
Nice one. I was just reading about that recently. Some potential with him I think.

sadmanbarty
05-11-2015, 10:45 PM
The Dutch genre of bubbling began in 1988 when Moortje, a DJ from Curacao (one of the islands in the Dutch Antilles), accidentally played a track on a dancehall LP at 45 rpm instead of 33 in Club Voltage. Rather than booing and shouting the Dutch equivalent of Oi! It's all gone Pete Tong, mate", the crowd loved what they heard.

Inspired by this moment, Moortje started making beats with sped-up ragga vocal loops, percussion influenced by traditional Antillean tambu music and rave-esque synths.

http://www.theguardian.com/global/2008/nov/24/bubbling

sadmanbarty
05-11-2015, 11:06 PM
The riff of 'sweet child of mine' was just a string skipping exercise slash used to warm up, but the band heard it in rehearsal and decided to make a song out of it.

pete thownshend's windmill came from seeing keith richards swinging his arms around to warm up and pete thinking it was a playing technique.

Hendrix burnt his guitar at moneterey to one up the who. the who had gone on before him (decided by a coin toss) and had already done the guitar smashing thing, so hendrix took it a stage further and set his guitar on fire.

Traffic congestion at woodstock meant that many of the artists didn't arrive on time meaning Ritchie havens, the opening act, had to go long. He had done every song in his repertoire but the following acts still hadn't arrived, so he improvised freedom, based on the traditional spiritual 'motherless child'

sadmanbarty
05-11-2015, 11:27 PM
miles davis meeting and subsequently marrying betty mabry. She introduced him to the funk of sly stone and james brown as well as the hard rock of hendrix. These influences would come to define his 70's output.

sadmanbarty
06-11-2015, 09:39 AM
murder of panhead, leading buju banton to embrace social consciousness

jesse saunders getting robbed leading to the creation of house

wu tang basement flood

Seeing the crowd at Acme, the then promoter Andy Czezowski started up the Roxy, a London nightclub during the original outbreak of punk in England, so that people could go from the store and have some place to party. As most bands of that era had yet to be recorded, there were limited punk rock records to be played. Instead, Don Letts included many dub and reggae records in his sets, and is credited with introducing those sounds to the London punk scene

Benny B
06-11-2015, 10:03 AM
'legend has it' all the velvet underground's noisy effects pedals got pinched the night before recording their third lp, hence the gentle, unadorned sound.

sadmanbarty
06-11-2015, 01:05 PM
Herbie Hancock happened to be passing through the building during the recording of tribute to Jack Johnson. He was ushered into the studio and given the organ to play, hence his presence on the record.

Mr. Tea
06-11-2015, 06:13 PM
what would Sabbath have sounded like if Tony Iommi hadn't injured his hand in the factory accident? more conventional, less heavy?

I love this story. Apparently it was the tips of the middle and ring fingers on his right hand (bearing in mind he's left-handed) that he lost to a sheet metal cutter as a teenager. He improvised a pair of prostheses based on thimbles which allowed him to carry on playing, but his fingers now weren't strong enough to bend the strings as much as he liked. His only option was to downtune the strings pretty far to reduce the tension - and thus was born Black Sabbath's trademark guitar sound, and arguably heavy metal in its entirety.

trza
06-11-2015, 07:10 PM
Isn;t it crazy how snoop dogg never made a good album after his body guards shot that ethiopian guy right in front of him

nomos
06-11-2015, 07:56 PM
Young Gary Numan walks into the studio to make a punk album. Moog has other ideas ...

(from 1:50)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycLiQ8-dZq4&feature=youtu.be&t=1m50s

trza
07-11-2015, 11:49 PM
I was thinking about how Snoop had his bodyguards shoot a guy and he was dragged to court and got depressed and slowed down his career and he never made a good album after that even though his name is out there and everyone knows him.

Then I thought about the “Heavy D and Puff Daddy Celebrity Charity Basketball Game,” where 9 people died after a crowd stampede. Blame for the incident rolled uphill and the media went after Puff Daddy. The tabloid headlines meant P Diddy got dropped from his label job and he had to start his own label with a new name a couple years later with a bunch of new artists. He was a bazillion times more successful afterwards but the incident got him out of his bad situation with the previous major label.

droid
29-01-2016, 10:03 PM
Simon bumping into Garfunkel completely by chance on the street in NY in '62 when they were both in college, and going onto record the sound of silence and Wednesday morning 2 years later.

droid
29-01-2016, 10:07 PM
I cant help but think that there's something good in Bowie painting Ken Pitt's office, meeting Marc Bolan (who'd been offered the same chance to earn a few quid), becoming mates and leaving the job room half done - they knew of each other and probably would have met anyway...

droid
01-02-2016, 12:51 PM
Paul Nelson being the first person to play Woody Guthrie to Dylan when he was at the University of Minnesota, leading to Dylan stealing his folk record collection before moving to NY: http://www.examiner.com/article/dylan-s-latest-brush-with-plagarism

There's a fanzine angle to this as well, the folk fanzine Nelson ran was the connective tissue.

bun-u
01-02-2016, 03:54 PM
the countless times musicians have run into each other in elevators and somehow produced a hybrid artist - that's serendipitous

luka
01-02-2016, 04:10 PM
Heh!

trza
01-02-2016, 05:27 PM
yeah musicians literally bumping into each other like subatomic particles in the hadron supercollider is great but after a certain age many guys move out of the hood and get a house in the suburbs and never bump into anyone

droid
20-03-2016, 05:25 PM
Moog-Oldham leaving a disastrous Stones Rehearsal in 1963 and literally walking straight into the Beatles who proceeded to play their new tune to the Stones, inspiring a Brian Jones riff and their first hit single.

Kemper Boyd
21-03-2016, 06:25 PM
Steve Diggle went down to the Free Trade Hall to meet another band only to be ushered upsatirs where Shelley and Devoto were setting up.

droid
24-05-2016, 11:48 AM
Right, this is the UR-example right here:


In a calm morning in March 1968, a shipment carrying the latest Korgs, Moogs and Hammond organs set off from Baltimore harbour, heading for an exhibition in Rio de Janeiro. The sea was steady, the containers safely attached. And yet later that same day, the ship would inexplicably vanish.

A few months later, it finally reappeared. Somehow, the ship had been marooned on the São Nicolau island of Cabo Verde (now Cape Verde, but then a Portuguese territory 350 miles off the west coast of Africa). The crew were nowhere to be seen and the cargo was commandeered by local police. But when it was found to contain hundreds upon hundreds of keyboards and synths, an anti-colonial leader called Amílcar Cabral declared the instruments should be distributed equally among the archipelago’s schools.

Overnight, a whole generation of young Cabo Verdeans gained free access to cutting-edge music gear. According to Frankfurt-based rarities label Analog Africa, this bizarre turn of fate can be directly credited with inspiring the island’s explosion of newly electrified sounds following independence in 1975, and has now been documented on its on its latest compilation, Space Echo – The Mystery Behind The Cosmic Sound Of Cabo Verde.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/may/24/space-echo-mystery-behind-cosmic-sound-cabo-verde

IdleRich
26-05-2016, 08:52 AM
I think the Cape Verde story might be bollocks unfortunately.

droid
26-05-2016, 09:50 AM
But I want to believe.

trza
27-05-2016, 02:50 PM
Some kid writing for the Guardian fell for the shipwreck story and the Guardian is such a good source that if they published it then it must be true.

Then there is the legend of the German accordeon coming to Columbia after a shipwreck:

Basic vallenato consists of three instruments:

The caja, a small drum played with bare hands like a bongo (which arrived along with the slaves from Africa)
The guacharaca, a small, ribbed stick that is scratched with a fork, making a sound similar to maracas. The guacharaca was originally used by indigenous Colombian tribes to hunt birds.
The accordion, of German origin. Stories vary about how this Teutonic instrument made its way into Colombian music; my favorite is that a ship full of accordions headed to Argentina sank off the Colombian coast.

Vallenato developed through cattle farmers who travelled from village to village selling their livestock

Documentary about cumbia that starts with shipwreck myth and imagery

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqgPHjaNNpo

droid
27-05-2016, 03:12 PM
Ha. Yes. Sneaky marketing: https://analogafrica.bandcamp.com/album/space-echo-the-mystery-behind-the-cosmic-sound-of-cabo-verde-finally-revealed

IdleRich
27-05-2016, 04:35 PM
What's weird to me - in the Guardian a load of people below the line pointed out that it wasn't true, that the article missed out the stuff about it going to space and that Korg weren't selling keyboards until the seventies and so on... and the guy who wrote it came back on and said that it was definitely true and he'd checked it all out himself. Weird.

droid
20-06-2016, 10:44 AM
Queen's debut performance on TOTP, made possible by the promo for 'Rebel Rebel' not turning up on time.

The Sex Pistols appearing on Bill Grundy's show only because Queen pulled out at the last minute.

2nd one Confirmed in John Lydon's book.

droid
13-11-2016, 01:24 AM
William Friedkin randomly picking up a white label of Tubular bells in Ahmet Ergun's office and then sending it to #1 in the US charts after popularising it via the Exorcist soundtrack.

Cue a fame-shy and anxiety ridden Oldfield retreating into seclusion and a variety of self-help, primal scream and psychotherapy programs, limiting his output and neutering his 'talents', thus saving the world from the further musical atrocities that would surely otherwise have ensued.

droid
13-11-2016, 11:00 PM
Tipped to this one by Woebot on his excellent glam edition of woebot radio



First, we must mention the case of one Marc Feld, an Eastern London boy and the son of a lorry driver. The 13-year-old Feld met Cochran outside the Hackney Empire, a theater in the London borough of Hackney, where Cochran had just played a concert. Cochran allowed the boy to carry his guitar out to his limousine. Feld later renamed himself Dib Cochran and fronted a band called The Earwigs, although that was sort a joke name, an homage to the performer who had inspired him. Marc Feld was at this time already becoming famous under another stage name, Marc Bolan. With his band T. Rex, Bolan helped create glam rock, and the band enjoyed a top-10 hit in America with "Bang a Gong (Get It On)."

But that wasn't the end of the saga of Cochran's guitar. After his death, when the guitar was impounded in Wiltshire, a young policeman used it to teach himself how to play. That policeman's name was David Harman, but he would soon change his name to Dave Dee and cofound a band called Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich. This band became one of the first wave of the British Invasion, along with the Beatles. While Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich never enjoyed much success in the U.S. (although the charted with "The Legend of Xanadu"), they spent more weeks in the UK Singles Chart than The Beatles, and enjoyed unprecedented success worldwide.

https://www.minnpost.com/max-about-town/2011/10/strange-legacy-eddie-cochrans-guitar

droid
08-03-2017, 10:16 AM
Youngstarr winning £1500 on the lotto in 2001, using most of the cash to buy a desk and an Akai 2000 and then making Pulse X, arguably changing the face of London music for the next 15 years.

Corpsey
08-03-2017, 10:20 AM
This isn't really a 'random event' but:

[Joni Mitchell] taught herself guitar from a Pete Seeger songbook,[23] but the polio had affected her fingers, and she had to devise dozens of alternative tunings of her own. Later this improvised approach was "a tool to break free of standard approaches to harmony and structure" in her own songwriting.[24]

droid
08-03-2017, 10:31 AM
Incidentally, Neil young caught Polio during the same epidemic, the last major outbreak in Ontario.

droid
25-04-2017, 10:40 AM
The Four Freshman - a huge influence on Brian Wilson and the Beach boys:


On March 21, 1950, The Four Freshmen got a break when band leader Stan Kenton heard the quartet in Dayton, Ohio's, Esquire Lounge. He "had been told at his own show earlier that night about a quartet in town that sounded like his 43-piece ensemble",[3] and was sufficiently impressed that he arranged for an audition with his label, Capitol Records, which signed them later that year.

droid
20-05-2017, 01:19 AM
Stevie Wonder visits Jamaica in October 1975 for the 'dream concert', a benefit gig for the Salvation army 'Jamaican institute for the blind' alongside the wailers & third world. During his stay he visits the institute where he meets a musically talented ten year old who lives on the premises on old hope road, and encourages the young man to pursue a career in music.

Frankie Paul goes on to dominate dancehall in the 80's and early 90's, working with virtually every label and producer on the Island and releasing some of the most enduring anthems of the era.

RIP.

droid
22-08-2017, 12:03 PM
80's gated reverb happened accidently because Hugh Padgham didnt know how to use his desk.


https://youtu.be/Bxz6jShW-3E

sadmanbarty
22-08-2017, 03:57 PM
Future purports to have been so high in the studio recording tony montana that he couldn't open his mouth properly and in the process pioneering a style that's come to dominate atlanta rap for the last few years

2.34

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFD4e0t9pHc

CrowleyHead
23-08-2017, 03:28 PM
What a worker.

droid
01-09-2017, 02:08 PM
In 1975, 16 year old Frank Schuldiner is killed in a car crash. His parents buy Frank's younger brother Chuck a guitar to distract him from his grief. 9 years later Chuck forms the band 'Death', effectively invents death metal, transforming the genre and becoming one of its most influential figures.

baboon2004
16-09-2017, 03:00 PM
Professor Longhair's distinctive style of New Orleans blues piano playing was shaped by learning to play on an instrument that was missing some keys

sadmanbarty
16-09-2017, 06:14 PM
i've read somewhere that mccoy tyner's left handed, hence his signature heavy left hand playing. I suppose the argument could be made that this gave him the unique ability to define the pedal point based modal jazz sound in the 60's.

baboon2004
16-09-2017, 07:36 PM
Makes a lot of sense. Also the LH is more pronounced/sharper attack in general in his playing.

just now been playing (badly)McCoy Tyner's solo from My Favourite Things...insanely beautiful music.

sadmanbarty
17-09-2017, 10:09 PM
Makes a lot of sense. Also the LH is more pronounced/sharper attack in general in his playing.

just now been playing (badly)McCoy Tyner's solo from My Favourite Things...insanely beautiful music.

You should post your version.

baboon2004
17-09-2017, 11:37 PM
That would be a mistake.

droid
25-10-2017, 05:16 PM
New Orleans, early 1900's. His parents having separated and living with his grandmother as a result, a young Louis Armstrong is taken on as a delivery boy for The Karnofskys, a Jewish family who ran a rag and bone business. The 7 year old Armstrong would toot a tin horn from the back of the junk cart and sing along with the Russian Lullabies sung by Mrs. Karnofsky. Recognising his talent, the Karnofsky's encouraged him to sing, and when he saw a battered cornet in a pawn shop window they advanced him $5 in wages to buy it...

Armstrong would go on to wear a star of David medal for the rest of his life.

Mr. Tea
25-10-2017, 05:45 PM
New Orleans, early 1900's. His parents having separated and living with his grandmother, a young Louis Armstrong is taken on as a delivery boy for The Karnofskys, a Jewish family who ran a rag and bone business. The 7 year old Armstrong would toot a tin horn from the back of the Junk cart and sing along with the Russian Lullabies sung by Mrs. Karnofsky. Recognising his talent, the Karnofsky's encouraged him to sing, and when he saw a battered cornet in a pawn shop window they advanced him $5 in wages to buy it...

Armstrong would so on to wear a star of David medal for the rest of his life.

This is beautiful but it does sound a bit like one of those stories that ends "And that little boy's name? Albert Einstein."

CrowleyHead
25-10-2017, 06:42 PM
Tea, the first man to let someone know "Actually Frankenstein is the name of the monster's creator."

luka
25-10-2017, 08:13 PM
snigger

Mr. Tea
25-10-2017, 10:10 PM
Heh, guilty as charged.

And yet:

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