PDA

View Full Version : Music Pioneered In The 2010's?



sadmanbarty
04-09-2015, 11:09 AM
I'm looking for genres/sub-genres that have been pioneered in the 2010's.

So far I've got:

- Deep Tech

- Jackin House

- Brostep

- Chicago Bop

- Gqom

- Moombathon

- Trap

- To an extent American's rapping over 'nuum/UK Bass (Azealia Banks, etc.) offers something a little different

- Nu-grime/art-grime/industrial grime

- Ratchet

- Drumstep

- Zouk


Other older stuff has been popularised beyond its initial geography:

- Footwork

- Jersey/Philly Club

- Azonto/Naija

- Kuduro


Anything else?

Which one seems to be the biggest paradigm shift?

CrowleyHead
04-09-2015, 01:22 PM
Ballroom got popularized in the last 5 years, uhm... I'd say Witchhouse, as silly as it was, did happen in 09-11 so hey.

Pandiculate
04-09-2015, 03:53 PM
5 years ago is creeping my out by how far away it all seems. I guess you're missing Drill which blew up for all of about six months but that can come under Trap

luka
04-09-2015, 04:18 PM
presumably he means trap in the EDM sense not the rap sense?

Pandiculate
04-09-2015, 05:00 PM
presumably he means trap in the EDM sense not the rap sense?

ah, I've managed to keep clear of that fuckery

sadmanbarty
04-09-2015, 07:30 PM
Ballroom got popularized in the last 5 years, uhm... I'd say Witchhouse, as silly as it was, did happen in 09-11 so hey.


Hadn't come across Witchhouse before. Interestingly it draws from chopped & screwed and industrial like a lot of hip hop from the last 5 years. Similarly there's the industrial grime of the last few years (though the sound has precedent in Milanese, so can't really say that's this decade's innovation).

CrowleyHead
05-09-2015, 02:56 AM
Interestingly it draws from chopped & screwed and industrial like a lot of hip hop from the last 5 years. .

G'night.

sadmanbarty
05-09-2015, 10:41 AM
Knackered House. Another DJ Screw influenced sound.

A similar thing here with slowed down Ballroom:

https://soundcloud.com/rushmore/100-bpm-ballroom-beats

m99188868
05-09-2015, 02:03 PM
For lack of a better description: Night slugs house (probably close to ballroom, sonically at least). Also that Mexican (Monterrey) tribal house blew up that year. Didn't last long, though.

sadmanbarty
06-09-2015, 04:34 PM
Sea punk & vaporwave. Two more chopped and screwed influenced genres.

trza
06-09-2015, 05:06 PM
i think they are more nineties industrial honestly

sadmanbarty
14-09-2015, 10:42 AM
Simon Reynolds had some things to say about this thread:


http://energyflashbysimonreynolds.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/genre-watch.html

rubberdingyrapids
14-09-2015, 11:46 AM
shittest decade ever?

tough to make the call if youre looking strictly at the 2010s but i think afrobeats is the 'newest' thing around.

rubberdingyrapids
14-09-2015, 11:55 AM
not really a genre, exactly, but i think rustie was making stuff that you couldnt easily say was something older. and it was lots of fun too. hud mo too, even if i hate a lot of his music.

Corpsey
14-09-2015, 08:10 PM
This whole search for a brand new sound is a bit of a dead end IMO, better to look at how a genre like rap is developing and mutating beyond what people could conceive it could be fifteen years ago. Obviously a lot of people HATE what its become, but the same is true of jungle, grime, etc.

I wonder if a paradigm shift such as Reynolds longs for would be better sought in vocals than rhythms (talking dance music here) - perhaps that's nonsense but if you look at rap music and the use of auto tune this is where the genuinely mindbending and alien shifts are happening. And dance music, by and large, lacks vocals, and therefore lacks e.g. political depth. Which I'm sure Reynolds argues is what makes it more revolutionary in an anti rockist sense but I wonder if purely instrumental music has become by this stage fairly arid creatively.

Leo
14-09-2015, 10:07 PM
I wonder if a paradigm shift such as Reynolds longs for...

i didn't read his post as he's longing for it, more just his thoughts as to whether those genres on the list provided have achieved it.

rubberdingyrapids
14-09-2015, 11:32 PM
i think there is definitely new stuff in rap, and in R&B - reynolds might not think mustard is making something totally new, but i mean, its new ENOUGH, i think he sometimes expects too much, and seems to forget even things like jungle didnt spring out of the ether, they gradually became what they did through hardcore, etc. but i think in a mainstream sense, when i hear how bland and familiar a lot of stuff is, it is a bit depressing.

trza
15-09-2015, 12:14 AM
new categories at the online record store include "bass", "international", "deep dubstep" and "americana"....

CrowleyHead
15-09-2015, 12:16 AM
Ah, some forget the days of "electronica" and "alternative"

firefinga
15-09-2015, 11:43 AM
The "paradigm shift" of the 2010s was the full move to fully digital now in all aspects of (pop)music one the one hand.

Sub-shifts: move away from mp3s to streaming (and from mp3 players to listening to music on your smart fone)

The "vinyl-renaissance" finally kiling off the small (mostly dance) indie labels who actually were putting out vinyl over the last 2 decades due to the hipsters'-need of showing off their gatefold 180g vinly BS represses of Oasis or whatever over instagram. Thus, the pressing plants don't give a shit about aforementioned small labesl much any more and postpone and/or fuck up small vinly runs and put those labels out of business.

denoir
15-09-2015, 01:54 PM
I think zouk has been around for a couple decades already...

I would add the slow-fast juke-jungle style, if drumstep is on the list...Om Unit etc. Also the "autonomic" dnb became quite a big thing for a while

Pandiculate
15-09-2015, 05:18 PM
The "paradigm shift" of the 2010s was the full move to fully digital now in all aspects of (pop)music one the one hand.

Sub-shifts: move away from mp3s to streaming (and from mp3 players to listening to music on your smart fone)

The "vinyl-renaissance" finally kiling off the small (mostly dance) indie labels who actually were putting out vinyl over the last 2 decades due to the hipsters'-need of showing off their gatefold 180g vinly BS represses of Oasis or whatever over instagram. Thus, the pressing plants don't give a shit about aforementioned small labesl much any more and postpone and/or fuck up small vinly runs and put those labels out of business.

Do you reckon we could be 3D-printing Vinyl in a few years?

sadmanbarty
15-09-2015, 05:28 PM
Is the the sliding/glide pitch shift on vocals something only widely used 2009 onwards or were people doing it before?

53 secs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2nmgcVbfKE&feature=youtu.be&t=53s

firefinga
16-09-2015, 06:56 AM
Do you reckon we could be 3D-printing Vinyl in a few years?

I don't know much about 3D printing other than the fact it's been hyped currently (although in industry it is around for a few good years already for mock ups/prototypes) - so from the technical side of things I don't know if 3D printing of vinyl is even possible.

droid
16-09-2015, 10:20 AM
Fundamental question here that bandshell has touched on.

Every paradigm shift, every 'new' genre is a combination or a synthesis of something that has gone before. Like a fractal, the closer you look the more detail appears, so (to take an example) punk seemed like something radically new, but even a cursory examination can trace the immediate sources (60's garage rock, early 70's Detroit and CBGB's etc) and the antecedents (50's rock n' roll). In this sense the 'spike' of something new looks like a slope when you look closely, and Im sure that there were people saying the that punk was just a repackaging of old ideas at the time.

So - if there is never anything truly new then why did we ever think there was? Its not just that musicmakers have access to everything ever made al the time, but also that listeners now have the same access, or rather, the ability to forget has been lost. 'Newness' is as much a social & psychological construct as much as something objective, so, pre internet, when something vanished for 5 years, it was totally gone, and when it reappeared in a slightly different guise it seemed like it really was something new.

The alternative is - as you get older, and see and hear more and nothing seems new. You could probably make a good argument that the free availability of everything ever made is prematurely ageing the ears of a a generation.

droid
16-09-2015, 10:20 AM
I don't know much about 3D printing other than the fact it's been hyped currently (although in industry it is around for a few good years already for mock ups/prototypes) - so from the technical side of things I don't know if 3D printing of vinyl is even possible.

It is possible, and its shit.

droid
16-09-2015, 10:33 AM
The reduced attention span brought on by the mass of information doesn't help matters either. A mate and I were discussing how some of what's held up as cutting edge in electronic music atm isn't far off what Autechre were doing from 'Confield' onwards. He made the point that our generation of producers haven't really acquired our own tools yet and that the people from that era have a better grasp on even the newer software than most 'current' producers - there hasn't really been a massive leap on from samplers, drum machines and synths, other than programming environments like Max and Pure Data (which still don't seem to be too popular with the vast majority of producers.)

I was thinking about this in relation to that recent Sherbourne article. A lot of bleeding edge stuff sounds a lot like late 90's+ experimental electronica, or rather, those techniques synthesised with various other styles, so while some of the structures, context and rhythms seem new, the tone and mood are very IDM.

firefinga
16-09-2015, 01:33 PM
It's a safe bet that this thread was very likely inspired by Reynolds to a big extent and his ever ongoing quest for the "sound of now" or "shock of the now" (I think he called it something like that). and he is lamenting that there isn't much giving him this shock. Well, I might go along with that. However, at least to my (soon to be 36) year old ears (born late 1979) there is plenty of the "sound of the now" around, much has been mentioned in the above posts. It's just that sound of the now is - structurally at least - similar to what the whole entertianment industry is trying to sell. Namely, old stuff structure-wise but done with "better" (meaning fully digital) equipment. Just have a look at the movies/TV channels - their sales pitch for years now is - "brilliant picture, all in high definition!" or in 3D!!! hey, a shit movie stays a shit movie, be it in low resolution and mono or 4K and dolby surround.

I get the simila feeling with the majority of today's popmusic.

And then there is another thing - others have stated that before me but I thin kthere's much truth in it - lots of the best popmusic in the past came from working class kids/other misfits. In the (semi) public of todays mainstream media, the working class has largley disappeared or is portrayed as lazy welfare bums. That social energy of working class kids trying to make it via music has gone (or got eradicated by 30 year of Thatcherist hegemony)

droid
16-09-2015, 02:30 PM
And then there is another thing - others have stated that before me but I thin kthere's much truth in it - lots of the best popmusic in the past came from working class kids/other misfits. In the (semi) public of todays mainstream media, the working class has largley disappeared or is portrayed as lazy welfare bums. That social energy of working class kids trying to make it via music has gone (or got eradicated by 30 year of Thatcherist hegemony)

Also because (other than playing live) there is virtually no model for a career in music anymore. Hence the resurgence of hobbyists, auteurs and people who can generally afford to fuck around for a few years attempting to break through.

droid
16-09-2015, 03:04 PM
The universe is full of civilisations which have destroyed their art and culture by reckless super-networking and removing all barriers to the free flow of information.

I think there was a future shock about it.

sadmanbarty
16-09-2015, 11:49 PM
Fundamental question here that bandshell has touched on.

Every paradigm shift, every 'new' genre is a combination or a synthesis of something that has gone before.



A couple of things:

1. I'm not sure whether every new genre is created from combination and synthesis of what's gone before. Does the musical use of feedback predate 1964? Does Genre A + Genre B = Dub/Footwork/Chopped & Screwed/Free Jazz/Ambient/Noise/etc.? These may be extensions of other music, emphasising characteristics that were already there, etc., but that isn't the same as recombination.

2. Recombination doesn't necessarily discount something as a paradigm shift, just as long as the product creates a new aesthetic or set of idioms that weren't attainable via the music that had proceeded it.

droid
17-09-2015, 12:01 AM
A couple of things:

1. I'm not sure whether every new genre is created from combination and synthesis of what's gone before. Does the musical use of feedback predate 1964? Does Genre A + Genre B = Dub/Footwork/Chopped & Screwed/Free Jazz/Ambient/Noise/etc.? These may be extensions of other music, emphasising characteristics that were already there, etc., but that isn't the same as recombination.


I think there is a problem here in the definition of 'new'. When does recombination/synthesis cross that line?

Jungle is possibly the epitome of the shock of the new, and can be said to be radically different from everything that came before, but its quite possible to break it down and show that the sonic elements had all been done before in other contexts. Same goes for almost every genre. It seems that the subjective elements - the importance of social and cultural context plus the experience and knowledge of the listener are crucial factors.

Newness if like porn. Impossible to define but you know it when you see it.


2. Recombination doesn't necessarily discount something as a paradigm shift, just as long as the product creates a new aesthetic or set of idioms that weren't attainable via the music that had proceeded it.

Sure, but that sets the bar far too low. By that definition, EDM was definitely a paradigm shift, but there is almost nothing new about it sonically. In fact it's main aesthetic feature is the complete lack of originality.

BTW, Im just thinking out loud here. If anything this is an argument against retromania, or rather, an argument around it, when, in fact, I pretty much agree with the theory.

firefinga
17-09-2015, 08:08 AM
Like it or not, but EDM has been indeed the last "Paradigm Shift" in popmusic bc it is a game changer. Despite sonically being mostly a washed down version of what's been there before, almost any aspects of "electronic dance music" as we - the old farts 30/40 something who still go here - have known have been eradicated.

This "culture" is absolutley and thoroughly commercialised, music is mostly being consumed via streaming, there is almost no "physical trace" in the form of recordings/compilations. DJs are "brands" with logo and all that shit, in fact the music is the least important aspect of all this circus.

The audience doesn't know nor care for the 30+ years of history of electronic dance music , and this EDM monster has almsot comletely developed outside of the "established" dance culture.

rubberdingyrapids
17-09-2015, 09:34 AM
yeah, its actually this -

the importance of social and cultural context plus the experience and knowledge of the listener are crucial factors.
that makes EDM new.

droid
17-09-2015, 09:58 AM
Right, so 'newness' isn't just a sonic thing, in fact, it may not have anything to do with the music at all? In fact, could this be the paradigm shift? When fashion and spectacle completely eclipse the actual music?

(I appreciate that this is at cross purposes with how a critic might define it btw)

sadmanbarty
17-09-2015, 10:16 AM
1. Jungle is possibly the epitome of the shock of the new, and can be said to be radically different from everything that came before, but its quite possible to break it down and show that the sonic elements had all been done before in other contexts.

2. Sure, but that sets the bar far too low.


1. I think there are some new things about Jungle. It created a whole new set of rhythmic idioms (as defined by particular kick and snare emphasis) that I can't find precedent for. Aren't things like stuttering snare samples, crossfaded breaks, melodies played on pitch shifted snares and Akai vocal stretch original to Jungle? These elements place it as more then just recombination.

2. I'm not saying that all recombination leads to paradigm shifts, but that every now and then, to use a cliche, the whole is greater then the some of its parts. 'I Feel Love' is on the one hand a synthesis (excuse the pun) of disco and electronic music, yet on the other hand it established an entirely new aesthetic and set of possibilities that disco, krautrock or avant guard electronic music wouldn't have done on there own.

sadmanbarty
17-09-2015, 10:23 AM
There's been some talk about EDM. I don't know enough about the European dance music that informs it to say whether it's new or not (let alone a paradigm shift), but does the combination of hyper-compression and synths that carpet bomb the frequency range result in the new (and arguably paradigm shifting) 'digital maximalism' of the 2010's?

A 21st century wall of sound.

droid
17-09-2015, 10:48 AM
1. I think there are some new things about Jungle. It created a whole new set of rhythmic idioms (as defined by particular kick and snare emphasis) that I can't find precedent for. Aren't things like stuttering snare samples, crossfaded breaks, melodies played on pitch shifted snares and Akai vocal stretch original to Jungle? These elements place it as more then just recombination.

I would certainly agree that jungle was something new, in fact, Id say it was probably the biggest (and last) great innovation in dance music, particularly between 94-96.

BUT, playing devil's advocate, rhythmically, despite outliers, most of the polyrhythm in jungle can still be boiled down to the snare on the 2 & the 4, ala funk and hip hop. Timestretching was a great effect, but not dramatically different from pitch experiments using tape, stretching back decades. Pitch shifted melody played on drums - actually very rarely used, and lets not forget that the Eventide Harmoniser, the great leap forward in terminator, was first used on drums by Visconti back in '76 during the recording of Low, and sold to Bowie with the exact line that "it fucks with the fabric of time' - which could have come straight out of Goldie's mouth whilst he was dancing around on the desk during that legendary e-fuelled session at Reinforced.

Jungle is in fact the ultimate recombinant genre. Breaks from funk & soul (via Hip hop), Sub Bass & vocals from reggae & dancehall, synths & pads from techno, female vocals from house, a bit of attitude from them all, all channeled through rave and bass culture.

Its a synthesis of practically every genre of late 20th century black music... ...but - couldn't you almost say the same about dubstep?

Music, and especially dance music suffers greatly from the idea of the constant revolution, the fetishisation of the new, the bolt from the blue (you can probably blame the Beatles for this), when in fact the story of music (and art) is largely a story of homages, remakes, plagiarism, rivalrous borrowings, nuanced imitations. An accretion of variations which may eventually reach a kind of critical mass where a line is crossed and we can say that this is something radically different to what came before - if the social and cultural conditions are aligned correctly and the attention span of the audience is sufficiently limited.


2. I'm not saying that all recombination leads to paradigm shifts, but that every now and then, to use a cliche, the whole is greater then the some of its parts. 'I Feel Love' is on the one hand a synthesis (excuse the pun) of disco and electronic music, yet on the other hand it established an entirely new aesthetic and set of possibilities that disco, krautrock or avant guard electronic music wouldn't have done on there own.

Yeah, good call.

sadmanbarty
17-09-2015, 12:31 PM
rhythmically, despite outliers, most of the polyrhythm in jungle can still be boiled down to the snare on the 2 & the 4, ala funk and hip hop.


Unfortunately in '95 the 2 and 4 emphasis crept there way back into jungle, but the vast majority of '94 jungle doesn't have snare emphasis on both the 2 and 4. There's a lot of emphasis on the 2 and the offbeat of 3, which often goes on to the 1 of the next bar, the off beat of 2 and then the 4. So '94 Jungle is rhythmically more akin to Bossa Nova then funk and hip hop (the trasillo rhythms making their way from the rest of Latin America to Jamaican dancehall, hence why 'urban' London was using them).

I suppose this could then prove your point that Jungle rhythms weren't new, though I would argue that 1) Jungle rearranged the tresillo rhythms so as to be less predictably then Bossa Nova and 2) combining Bossa Nova accents with funk sensibilities (volume dynamics, ghost notes, etc.) created a rhythmic palette that was unique to Jungle.

I'll have a listen to the Bowie, sounds interesting.

droid
17-09-2015, 12:50 PM
I know what youre saying re rhythm, and I would also make the argument that the stuff 'around' those beats fundamentally changes how you hear the rhythm - but to take an example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDvrQVG040g

So in the first bar of the main drum pattern you have a light snare (I think its hotpants) on the 2 & 4, and a strong rhythmic cadence in the second bar. The beat hops around between patterns, but that basic template remains mostly constant, kick/snare, kick/snare in the first bar.

Some info on the harmoniser here: https://valhalladsp.com/2010/05/07/early-pitch-shifting-the-eventide-h910-harmonizer/

rubberdingyrapids
17-09-2015, 02:54 PM
of course you can do musical geneaology with jungle and trace everything 'new' about it to something previous, but as a whole, jungle as a genre/sound WAS new.

trza
17-09-2015, 03:05 PM
I remember reading a book about jungle a long time ago, claiming the word jungle came from reggae vocal samples referring to a housing project in Kingston known as Tivoli Gardens that was nicknamed "the jungle". I am too lazy to fact check or see if its confirmed or disproved on the internet today.

Odlly, I am in a bossa nova listening phase right now, so long after my drum and bass phase.

droid
17-09-2015, 03:10 PM
of course you can do musical geneaology with jungle and trace everything 'new' about it to something previous, but as a whole, jungle as a genre/sound WAS new.

Sure - you know it when you hear it right? :D

droid
17-09-2015, 03:12 PM
I remember reading a book about jungle a long time ago, claiming the word jungle came from reggae vocal samples referring to a housing project in Kingston known as Tivoli Gardens that was nicknamed "the jungle". I am too lazy to fact check or see if its confirmed or disproved on the internet today.

Odlly, I am in a bossa nova listening phase right now, so long after my drum and bass phase.

It was Arnett gardens. They have a football team nicknamed the 'junglists'. Highly debatable that this is the source of the name, however plausible it sounds.

sadmanbarty
17-09-2015, 03:27 PM
of course you can do musical geneaology with jungle and trace everything 'new' about it to something previous, but as a whole, jungle as a genre/sound WAS new.

Ironically I was in the process of trying to prove that Jungle's rhythms were unprecedented (and moreover innovation can arise from more then recombination) when I outlined how they are a descendant of the Bossa Nova, by way of Dancehall.

trza
17-09-2015, 03:43 PM
I had been sharing some mixes of Bossa Nova from my latest musical phase under my lusophonic alter ego, but I share them with my friends and they don't listen and promoting mixes is like hitting your head against a wall anyway. I've read one good book about bossa and a couple bad ones, and downloaded every brazilian jazz album I can find over the past three years. My itunes says I have nineteen days of brazilian music on my list of stuff I intend to listen to. I never thought about describing it as "proto-jungle", but whatever you can listen to my mixes here

https://www.mixcloud.com/TristaoDaCunha/

droid
17-09-2015, 03:55 PM
The Latin influence of Dancehall is clear - though it must be said that it is but one influence, restricted primarily to the 'Bam Bam' rhythm, which I was told was called simply 'the pattern' in Jamaica, and is the primary rhythmic template for Reggaeton, and also the 'bom-bom--click, triplet kick/snare pattern established by the Punanny and popularised in the early 90s. Also complicating things there is the influence of Bhangra.

Very interesting observation, but Im not sure you can draw a line of rhythmic influence to jungle though.

CrowleyHead
17-09-2015, 09:18 PM
I thought the dancehall riddim they loved to recycle in reggaeton was Dem Bow?

sadmanbarty
17-09-2015, 11:21 PM
Outsider House Adding to the list of slowed down and lo-fi 'innovations' of the 2010's

droid
17-09-2015, 11:22 PM
Dem Bow, Fever Pitch, Bam Bam, Pounda - all basically the same riddim (& rhythm).

sadmanbarty
17-09-2015, 11:35 PM
Tropical House. The examples given in the following piece seems to be a sort of poppy, EDMish 'Galaxy Gardens':

http://www.gq.com/story/like-it-or-not-kygos-tropical-house-is-the-sound-of-the-summer

Again I don't know enough about EDM or the music that influenced it to know whether this is new sounding or not.

sadmanbarty
18-09-2015, 12:50 PM
A cursory google search of 'new music genre':

Kawaii Metal/Cute Metal

Bongo Flava - supposedly one of those genres that have spread beyond initial geography in the 2010's

PBR&B

Stadium Dolewave

Intergalactic hip hop

Tropical Goth

Babylon Style

Orchestral Dream Pop

Lounge Goth

PC Music

Flutedrop

rubberdingyrapids
16-10-2015, 02:01 PM
maybe its good that music isnt so obsessed with the new. allows you to focus on other things, like personality, songcraft, melody, etc. also maybe its like pop/music rebelling against capitalism's need to constantly sell you something new just for the sake of it. also a challenge to writers to come up with something to say - its easier when something is obviously innovative.

sadmanbarty
18-10-2015, 04:36 PM
maybe its good that music isnt so obsessed with the new. allows you to focus on other things, like personality, songcraft, melody, etc. also maybe its like pop/music rebelling against capitalism's need to constantly sell you something new just for the sake of it. also a challenge to writers to come up with something to say - its easier when something is obviously innovative.


Sonic innovations tend to be accompanied by wider ideological and/or aesthetic shifts as well, so I don't think the two are mutually exclusive. Likewise, I don't see a correlation between sonic stagnation and increased personality, innovators like John Lydon, miles Davis and sun ra were all big personalities.

CrowleyHead
18-10-2015, 06:52 PM
So how does one look on the fact from a Capitalist perspective that the music industry just wants to repeatedly remind you of say, 100 or so artists who they have a situation where they can continuously re-release product from and know a public will obediently purchase it? I'm just reflecting on the constant re-rinsing of canonical artists and how that appears to be how major labels seem to thrive, by flogging those back catalogs as a resource and dealing with new music in a rather limited and distancing manner.

luka
18-10-2015, 07:21 PM
[QUOTE]Sonic innovations tend to be accompanied by wider ideological and/or aesthetic shifts as well, [/QUOTE
QUOTE]

Yeah?

luka
18-10-2015, 07:23 PM
I'm just reflecting on the constant re-rinsing of canonical artists and how that appears to be how major labels seem to thrive, by flogging those back catalogs as a resource and dealing with new music in a rather limited and distancing manner.

Craner will tell you all about this trend in publishing (books) too cunts pls leave us alone

sadmanbarty
18-10-2015, 07:52 PM
[QUOTE]Sonic innovations tend to be accompanied by wider ideological and/or aesthetic shifts as well, [/QUOTE
QUOTE]

Yeah?

Acid/Psychedelic Rock- Hippies/Pacifism/Age of Aquarius/Sexual Revolution/Etc - Tie dye/psychadelia (later again with Balearic, madchester/ rave etc.)

Gangsta Rap- Gangsta/Hustle/Realness/Street- Baggy cloths/low trousers/etc.

Synthpop- New Romantics

Punk- Nihilism/Aggression/Anti-social- Safety pins/mohawks/ripped genes

Metal- Occultism/ Satanism/ Fantasy- Pentagrams/ Devil horns

Reggae- Rastafarianism- Red,gold,green/dreadlocks


etc.

luka
19-10-2015, 08:12 AM
Lol! Alright mate

mistersloane
20-10-2015, 04:18 AM
So how does one look on the fact from a Capitalist perspective that the music industry just wants to repeatedly remind you of say, 100 or so artists who they have a situation where they can continuously re-release product from and know a public will obediently purchase it? I'm just reflecting on the constant re-rinsing of canonical artists and how that appears to be how major labels seem to thrive, by flogging those back catalogs as a resource and dealing with new music in a rather limited and distancing manner.

Two ideas -
http://www.xenosystems.net/freedoom-prelude-1a/
(3) Entropy (considered, properly, as an inherently teleological process) is the driver of all complex systems. Capital Teleology does not trend towards an entropy maximum, however, but to an escalation of entropy dissipation. It exploits the entropic current to travel backwards, into cybernetically-intensified pathway states of enhanced complexity and intelligence. The ‘progress’ of capitalism is an accentuation of disequilibrium.

and Rob ~Playford talking about producing Goldie
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun98/articles/goldie.html
'The breakbeat is actually made up of two mono files on the sampler, which I adjusted separately, so that when I stuck them together, I had the break riding up and spinning around in the stereo soundfield. It sounded like nothing we'd ever heard, it was a revelation -- we listened to that for hours and hours.'

rubberdingyrapids
20-10-2015, 01:36 PM
this seems sort of relevant -
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0643t65

Robert Rowland Smith argues that we are coming to the end of the Age of Ideas. He examines how different 'ages' - of superstition, religion, reason and ideas - have emerged and gradually been eclipsed. And he hints at the age we may be about to enter.

the end of the age of ideas....
the end of the age of ideas in music?

woops
20-10-2015, 02:11 PM
sonic innovations may coincide with cultural-ideological-whatever but they stand apart

trza
08-11-2015, 10:35 PM
Is there a word for all these songs that sound the same with videos with choreographed dancers?

"Lean On" is a song recorded by American EDM group Major Lazer and French producer DJ Snake. It is a moombahton, dancehall and electronic song being also described as a house music ballad

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqeW9_5kURI

sadmanbarty
08-11-2015, 11:54 PM
Is there a word for all these songs that sound the same with videos with choreographed dancers?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqeW9_5kURI

The only other one I've heard which is similar is Jack U's 'Where Are You Now'. Both these songs are big favourites of mine this year, so would be grateful for other similar recommendations.

They both use melodic vocals (as opposed to rap or spoken word), plucky synth sounds, 808's and 'vocal science'. They are spacious, no synths carpet bombing the frequency spectrum like other EDM and have a warm sound palette; nothing other then the 808's are particularly shrill.

Definitely could be a genre in it's own right, but not enough has been produced to warrant a name just yet. I hope there is more to come though.

rubberdingyrapids
09-11-2015, 09:52 PM
did diplo do the bieber 'sorry' song too? cos that fits the same sort of sound.

the drake hotline bling single could kinda fit too (and obv DRAM's cha cha from a while back too).

CrowleyHead
10-11-2015, 08:34 PM
did diplo do the bieber 'sorry' song too? cos that fits the same sort of sound.

the drake hotline bling single could kinda fit too (and obv DRAM's cha cha from a while back too).

The Bieber "Sorry" song is Skrillex, who just did the Jack U thing with Diplo, so Diplo probably had some leftover ideas from ol' Skrill face.

sadmanbarty
13-11-2015, 01:33 PM
The full bieber album:

http://unartiste.co/justin-bieber-purpose-stream-here/

Doesn't particularly expound on the singles, still impressive though. A couple of nods to Kygo-style Tropical House, a lot of deep house influences given a bit of a boost with trap/edm drums. Nice bits of vocal science, nice use of reverb. Samples Janet Jackson's funny how time flies which is always a bonus. I'd be glad if this type of sound dominates pop for a bit.

luka
13-11-2015, 05:07 PM
Wicked can't wait to get this on

trza
13-11-2015, 05:52 PM
i thought he had hit his peak with Omaha Mall