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Leo
10-09-2015, 03:56 PM
Currently a bit bored with the music I own, need to liven things up with some new artists/tunes. Any genre, new or old.

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.

[I vaguely recall an old thread along these lines but couldn't find it...]

trza
10-09-2015, 05:25 PM
I recommend listening to radio music from your "glory days" over and over again. Then get into arguments with young kids who don't understand what good music is.

sufi
11-09-2015, 02:24 PM
this may perk you up somewhat...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeTfYGouwA4
Mario (Franco) - Franco & le T.P. O.K. Jazz Télé Zaire 1986

about a naughty badboy called Mario, who comes to a sticky end

(that's from i think my 4th set of glory days)

griftert
11-09-2015, 02:26 PM
I recommend listening to current popular music. Especially if you usually ignore it. I even quite like some Justin Bieber stuff.

CrowleyHead
11-09-2015, 11:48 PM
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Vmtaaor3JY4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

mistersloane
15-09-2015, 02:24 PM
Visit or revisit the Beach Boys back catalogue, they usually work for me if I'm feeling music-weary

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bp_8GKcNvdQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

m99188868
16-09-2015, 07:40 PM
I recommend listening to radio music from your "glory days" over and over again. Then get into arguments with young kids who don't understand what good music is.

I found Sherburne's Pitchfork primer on '90s IDM very helpful in that regard.

In all seriousness, I noticed a very positive plus-side to the feeling Leo describes and I recognise myself as well. For me it means more personal autonomy in what I chose to listen and like. I am not at all anymore victim to lusting for the most recent stuff only, which I partly was in the past. It is much easier to indicate what I like, in general. Negative side is that when newness doesn't suffice to make music thrilling and the 'need for new' is gone, you're facing the more difficult task of finding good music regardless of publication year/month/week.

Maybe I am just venting and projecting into something what Leo never wrote, so never mind.

Leo
16-09-2015, 08:21 PM
I found Sherburne's Pitchfork primer on '90s IDM very helpful in that regard.

In all seriousness, I noticed a very positive plus-side to the feeling Leo describes and I recognise myself as well. For me it means more personal autonomy in what I chose to listen and like. I am not at all anymore victim to lusting for the most recent stuff only, which I partly was in the past. It is much easier to indicate what I like, in general. Negative side is that when newness doesn't suffice to make music thrilling and the 'need for new' is gone, you're facing the more difficult task of finding good music regardless of publication year/month/week.

Maybe I am just venting and projecting into something what Leo never wrote, so never mind.

interesting perspective, thanks.

and thanks everyone for the suggestions. still searching but a good start.

droid
16-09-2015, 10:47 PM
Different from what Leo?

Leo
16-09-2015, 11:59 PM
Different from what Leo?

ha...well, see, i almost think it's better that i not say, wouldn't want to influence what anyone might suggest. like most people here, i listen to a broad range of things.

trza
17-09-2015, 01:42 AM
Just listen to new music made by the same people you liked when you were younger. I'm not sure what generation of music you are from. But the music industry is much kinder to older, past their prime musicians who still have a fanbase. Now they can make money from their older and established following. Back in the day a past their time artist would literally be kicked out of studios or venues. It seems like very day I read about some decades old artist with a new album out.

bruno
17-09-2015, 05:00 AM
interesting perspective, thanks.

and thanks everyone for the suggestions. still searching but a good start.

some ideas:

1
cinematic/propulsive pet shop boys-produced/assisted pop (because why not?)

boy george - the crying game
eighth wonder - i'm not scared
pet shop boys - i'm not scared; + the whole of introspective
electronic - disappointed
etc

2
70s soundtracks/library music. a potentially endless supply of this, healthy reissue situation for the early giallo/italian end but spotty for the end of the decade and france. some can be found for next to nothing, others the opposite.. if penniless there is always soulseek/blogs/youtube to infuse your life with music, some favourites:

francis lai, emmanuelle II 1975
james dashow, oedipus orca 1976
late 70s morricone: dedicato al mare egeo 1979, l'immoralitŕ 1978 and il deserto dei tartari 1979.
bruno nicolai, perché quelle strane gocce di sangue../case of the bloody iris 1971
a recent find is egisto macchi of nuova consonanza (the outfit shared with morricone, evangelisti) who i did not know before the several (semi-available) reissues, see voix, il deserto, sei composizioni.
also on a library tip: m zalla (piero umiliani), problemi d'oggi.

4
ryuichi sakamoto
polystyle and edward turned me on to him in an old thread, there is so much to discover, some favourites:

furyo/merry chistmas mr. lawrence.
nhk century of reform (mentioned by polystyle, thank you wherever you are).
left handed dream
bamboo houses split with sylvian

4
gabor lazar
terrific (recent) rhythmic music that sounds utterly alien, see his ep 16, ils and lp with mark fell.


i leave you with the credits to oedipus orca as the earth trembles (we are having some aftershocks):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJqjCOPoG58

baboon2004
17-09-2015, 12:32 PM
Obviously it all depends on what your habitual listening is, but I found that a couple of weeks of listening mostly to classical, free jazz and a bit of experimental that I would never usually go for, both broadened my musical horizons and reinvigorated my love for the music I more generally tend towards. For me, it was combined with delving back into (fairly basic) music theory, and working out how, say, Satie or Bill Evans improvisations are put together. It gave me a different perspective from previously.

Sakomoto is a great call, too, or any key musical figure with a big oeuvre/lots of different projects with different people who you've never explored before.

Leo
17-09-2015, 01:59 PM
excellent suggestions, bruno and baboon, appreciate it.

funny you both mention sakomoto, he's a guy i've always heard great things about and meant to explore over the years but never actually did. perhaps now is my chance.

Trillhouse
17-09-2015, 03:02 PM
All of YMO Sakomoto, Yukihiro Takahashi, Haruomi Hosono & Hideki Matsutake are all worth exploring in depth. Sakomoto & Hosono especially have very rewarding & massive back catalogues that can easily enough be found on the internet. If you then go into everybody they've worked with, you could be there a LONG time. Hosono's production work is well worth delving into though.

Relatively recently they both collaborated with Ichiko Aoba, one of my favourite contemporary Japanese artists. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJ-6N18zqEY

-

Alternatively, a good way of searching out something new is to pick a genre you're interested in and a country whose music you're not entirely familiar with, search for what exists out there & see where it takes you.

sufi
17-09-2015, 03:11 PM
This may be something different:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvQvQlatRfA

bruno
17-09-2015, 06:34 PM
excellent suggestions, bruno and baboon, appreciate it.

funny you both mention sakomoto, he's a guy i've always heard great things about and meant to explore over the years but never actually did. perhaps now is my chance.

you're welcome, leo. for a disco angle on sakamoto/ymo/etc see this thread (http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=4084). the trouble with these threads is that tend to be short and die out, we should keep this one going.

bruno
18-09-2015, 02:58 AM
This may be something different:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvQvQlatRfA

that was wonderful, thank you sufi. i confess i was not involved (too much spectacle?) until he began to sing, then i was transfixed.

baboon2004
18-09-2015, 09:35 AM
All of YMO Sakomoto, Yukihiro Takahashi, Haruomi Hosono & Hideki Matsutake are all worth exploring in depth. Sakomoto & Hosono especially have very rewarding & massive back catalogues that can easily enough be found on the internet. If you then go into everybody they've worked with, you could be there a LONG time. Hosono's production work is well worth delving into though.

Relatively recently they both collaborated with Ichiko Aoba, one of my favourite contemporary Japanese artists.

Alternatively, a good way of searching out something new is to pick a genre you're interested in and a country whose music you're not entirely familiar with, search for what exists out there & see where it takes you.

Good point about Hosono. Apologies for ILX, but this thread http://www.ilxor.com/ILX/ThreadSelectedControllerServlet?boardid=41&threadid=81134 is wonderful (scroll down and it starts to widen out from YMO to other Japanese new wave)

droid
18-09-2015, 11:52 AM
You might find some nice stuff in here. Questionable as to whether or not its music though: http://www.factmag.com/2014/11/18/a-beginners-guide-to-field-recording/

droid
18-09-2015, 11:54 AM
Speaking of Sakamoto - love this vid:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GsCVrcf1yPc

DannyL
18-09-2015, 08:41 PM
I got Sakamoto's Esperanto LP this week and it's absolutely brilliant. Kinda like weird avant-garde 80s hip hop. Soundtrack for a ballet I think? Absolutely second the Hosono rec. If you want to hear more of that sort of sound, "Fairlights, Mallets and Bamboo" (mix) is a pretty good starting place.

And if you'll forgive me for self-promotion, I did a radio show on the Ocora back cataloge. Might be fairly alien to you (it is to most people). Forgive me if you are totally down with field recordings: https://soundcloud.com/eleonoredesnos/lalternative_ocora_dan

Leo
12-11-2015, 07:12 PM
well, this is doing it at the moment.


Over the course of several months, Áine O'Dwyer was given access to the pipe organ in St Mark’s Church, Islington while the cleaners were at work. Primarily a harpist, this was a rare opportunity to grapple with the "king of instruments" and apply her sense of melodic, structured improvisation in a very different context.

Since it's impossible to exert complete control over such a recording environment, she entered into the sessions with a Cagean mindset, embracing the extra-musical sounds.This gave the recordings a unique character and concept. With the door left open to serendipity, it can seem that the sonic environment coalesces in sympathetic harmony. Here, the synth-like whoosh of the vacuum cleaner, a child's laughter, various echoed clatters and chatter become part of the music.

http://mie.limitedrun.com/products/537633-aine-odwyer-music-for-church-cleaners-vol-i-and-ii-2lp

https://aineodwyer.bandcamp.com/album/music-for-church-cleaners


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3IHZ902Wck

droid
12-11-2015, 09:16 PM
Dammit. Ive had that on my phone for the last year or so. Even played bits of it out.