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Corpsey
15-03-2016, 11:57 AM
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/mar/13/party-young-people-debt-jogging-drinking-fitness

I've scanned this article while at work so I've not ascertained to what extent it's a load of cobblers, but it interests me to consider if this phenomenon (if such a phenomenon exists) has had an effect on 'pop' music, which should really be produced by and consumed by the yoof.

Yesterday I saw David Drake (the rap journalist) deriding the notion that a certain rapper was the voice of a new generation, and implying that this was just a PR tactic. Whether or not he was OTM here is besides the point; what interested me was the realisation that I don't have any idea what the youth of today ARE into.

It strikes me that this forum is mostly made up of people (and mostly men) in their thirties. What I'm angling for is a PR campaign to lure the young to Dissensus, thereby reviving our ailing discussions and increasing inability to finger a pulse.

CrowleyHead
15-03-2016, 12:21 PM
Young kids aren't joining message boards though.

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:24 PM
crowleys still a young whippersnapper i thought

so from the article, we are deducing that:

jogging = poor inspiration for music
drinking = good inspiration for music

kids are more into vloggers now than music right? actually i think they are into the things we think they are: taylor swift videos, drake, kanye, vine videos, snapchat, the hunger games/j-law, etc. no real surprises tbh.

one thing im always surprised by is when i read reviews of gigs by artists i never heard of but they are playing at biggish venues, all under the radar, more or less. all cos of the internet.

luka
15-03-2016, 12:24 PM
Are they even listening to music? My 'young' friends are almost 30 now

sadmanbarty
15-03-2016, 12:26 PM
what interested me was the realisation that I don't have any idea what the youth of today ARE into.

It strikes me that this forum is mostly made up of people (and mostly men) in their thirties. What I'm angling for is a PR campaign to lure the young to Dissensus, thereby reviving our ailing discussions and increasing inability to finger a pulse.

I'm twenty. There's nothing I know of that people my age are listening to which is somehow elusive to dissensians. Young Thug and Future are the two biggest artists amongst people I know in the last couple of years.

As for the voice of a generation, look no further:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jUMdTXPCQE

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:28 PM
in the future, songs will only be six seconds long.

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:29 PM
Are they even listening to music? My 'young' friends are almost 30 now

well someone is still going clubbing, so prob yes.

luka
15-03-2016, 12:30 PM
Banging tune mate buzzing after hearing that

luka
15-03-2016, 12:30 PM
well someone is still going clubbing, so prob yes.

Don't think that really follows

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:30 PM
guardian journalists love pouring the misery on thick in any case

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:31 PM
Don't think that really follows

are clubs full of 50 quid dance-dads?

luka
15-03-2016, 12:34 PM
I just meant very few people at clubs are there 'for the music man'

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:39 PM
maybe

cant help wondering if thats something someone older than the youth of today would say though, 'ah kids today, theyre not really into music like our generation was'. then again, i think theres less in most modern music to really make someone that passionate about music, beyond there being some banging beats or a nice tune. though that might just be my age talking again.

prob some truth to it though.

maybe sadmanbarty can tell us. although, as he is young, he prob doesnt know about anything. j/k.

Corpsey
15-03-2016, 12:42 PM
Obviously the problem with this thread is that we won't get any evidence to proceed on, but surely the internet has changed the way young people consume music even more than it's changed how us old farts consume it?

I think I was actually prompted to think about all this first by luka saying that kids don't create music scenes as much now cos they've got constant access to all their friends, wherever they are, not to mention an endless stream of entertainment. Maybe he didn't say that but I wouldn't be surprised if some of the impetus for creating art HAS been taken away by 24 hour rolling cat memes.

Re: the jogging thing, I perceive a link between gym culture and all this new wave of house/urban music. Maybe that's just cos that's what they play in gyms? Mind you, there were plenty of gym rats at my school while me and the other weirdos spent our time smoking weed, skateboarding, etc...

Spuriouser and spuriouser

luka
15-03-2016, 12:43 PM
Thing is in the olden days I could turn on the radio and find out what was happening but that's no longer possible.

Corpsey
15-03-2016, 12:43 PM
Young kids aren't joining message boards though.

And this is the biggest tragedy of all.

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:46 PM
the net has changed how people think and feel about music, as a product of how they consume it (music is just 'content' now isnt it, like films and writing and everything else, just there to make up the numbers). i think music will always be important and play a role just cos of what music is, but i think the net has made kids look for new things that are of their generation, things that could only exist on the internet. no one is looking to music to learn about anything, and few people in music are tipping kids off to anything. social media etc etc is the leader, music is just a follower. like, i dont even know how important it is when you hear a 'new sound' in music, cos no one really cares about it in the wider sense, cos music doesnt occupy that cultural centre position anymore.

this is prob just old-man depressive talk though.

Corpsey
15-03-2016, 12:48 PM
That's interesting, too. The idea that music has lost its previous role/function in society. Is this why there's hardly any political music of note? Or is that just a general apathy towards politics?

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 12:55 PM
apart from apathy/jadedness about politics, i think thats about -

artists worrying about being shut down immediately on the internet for what they say and the reaction of social media/groupthink
jadedness about political music
cluelessness/disengagement from popular political movements (or political movements failing to have wider/populist engagement)
general tepidness/safeness of whats deemed acceptable in popular culture and careerism at work - most artists know music is trickier to navigate in terms of a way to make money, so why rock the boat unless youre starting out in a lucky position (which few are)
the internet/social media encourages people to 'play along' and not rock the boat, few people want to upset that

but mostly its just that social media gets there first (and theres obv a lot of causes social media has helped debate) - theres nothing to say after that (though i think music can still make politics more enduring and powerful than a tweet)

luka
15-03-2016, 01:02 PM
My generation never gave a shit about politics that's nothing new

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 01:10 PM
i dont think theres been 'deep' political engagement in popular music since the 60s/70s but what about hip hop in the 80s/90s? (mostly racial politics there, but still)

sadmanbarty
15-03-2016, 01:16 PM
A couple of thoughts re music's role in society and politics:

Subcultures don't seem to congregate around music anymore; whereas that was the case for most youth subcultures before (mods, rockers, skinheads, hippies, punks, goths, b boys, etc.).

Come to think of it I can't really recall any subcultures from the last 10 years. I suppose hipsters, which is telling because they would define themselves by musical eclecticism.

The closest I've come to music as social group was people in South East london using Giggs to signify that they were in the Peckham Boys.

Slacktivism has possibly taken away the need to signify your political affiliations by identifying with a subculture.

Though racial politics is a big theme in music recently.

Corpsey
15-03-2016, 01:18 PM
There have also been bit cuts to the arts in recent years, haven't there?

The Guardian again http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/apr/21/david-pountney-arts-funding-bad-for-our-cultural-health

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 01:24 PM
isnt the newer trend in political music/films etc for it to be wholly ambiguous and then wait for cultural critics/commentators to do the work for you? im trying to think of an example but i do seem to see a lot of pieces like that. then again, thats prob something cultural critics have always done.

luka
15-03-2016, 01:41 PM
There have also been bit cuts to the arts in recent years, haven't there?

The Guardian again http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/apr/21/david-pountney-arts-funding-bad-for-our-cultural-health

All arts council funding does is create a class of people who specialise in applying for arts council grants. A particularly wretched breed of scum. Losing youth centres etc would have more concrete effects though

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 01:42 PM
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/mar/15/millennials-anxiety-generation-y-housing-careers


Our culture is heightening young people’s awareness of millennial ideals – of how we think our lives should be – while simultaneously eroding the resources we need to achieve those dreams.

craner
15-03-2016, 02:40 PM
Subcultures don't seem to congregate around music anymore; whereas that was the case for most youth subcultures before (mods, rockers, skinheads, hippies, punks, goths, b boys, etc.).


According to Robert Elms none of that was actually about music, it was all about trousers.

sadmanbarty
15-03-2016, 03:23 PM
According to Robert Elms none of that was actually about music, it was all about trousers.

The man's got a point.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwGlhKcEBjY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dc3AovUZgvo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otBkSvbQbXU

Corpsey
15-03-2016, 03:27 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYbh6ob_R9M

This is what I picture the yoof to be like in America.

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 03:36 PM
see, youre in touch with the younger generation after all, watching rae sremmurd videos and all that.

face it, most of these old sub cultural groups werent really all about The Music Maaaaan, the music was just the pivot for people to form and bond around (and wear similar trousers together). but i suppose the music was still a glue back then, whereas now its maybe been relegated to being more of a nice, sometimes interesting background hum

Leo
15-03-2016, 03:46 PM
perhaps recent music-related subcultures are just smaller than they were in the past. what about something like odd future and all its offshoots (tyler, earl sweatshirt, the internet, etc.). to an old man like me, they seemed to come out of nowhere but in reality tyler had been a thing for a while and it all spread below my radar via social media to create a sizable following of disaffected black and white teens. no political angle, though.

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 03:50 PM
yeah thats the biggest development i think
people like that famous vlogger KSI who makes average rap music but still manages to sell out venues in quick time cos of his video blogs

Corpsey
15-03-2016, 04:34 PM
All the lads have got the short back and sides and floppy top hair now. They all look like disclosure. And that rinse FM pop music luka made a thread about - some of it is great, but a lot of it is really bland, tailor made for use in Wimbledon montages. But maybe that's just pop music.

Know what I mean though? Sam Smith. Rudimental. Inspirational choruses. Gym music.

WHY DONT THEY GET A BLOODY HAIRCUT?

Woebot
15-03-2016, 05:24 PM
followed the link through to that article corpsey. it's pretty confused - trying to wedge together two separate arguments - one about drinking - the other about shrinking horizons for young people. i suppose there is some common ground but she seems to think everyone spent the nineties was drunk (tho perhaps is that just code/shorthand for off their tits - in which case fair enough)

i reckon my first thought is that certainly in the UK since the sixties to some extent we've profited by not giving a toss. that devil-may-care attitude - sure it has had negative consequences for a few - but some people have made their way through life riding on that wave of confidence. it doesn't necessarily help being too serious and button-down. i mean, using her own examples, a lot of "work" actually gets done in social situations meeting people when one goes out for a drink who inadvertently turn out to be good contacts.

i do worry about ver kids though still. especially having two of my own (one a teenager!) it's globalisations dark hours isn't it.

music's place in the whole thing is, at least to me, pretty clear. simply not "important" any more. that's not to say it's necessarily not as good, but with less at stake (money, influence etc) the energy isn't there. music being only a conduit for those energies in the first place. but i'm not sure if im that bothered :-)

luka
15-03-2016, 06:25 PM
she seems to think everyone spent the nineties was drunk

provincial nightclub '90s. second half the '90s. Gazza, Danny Baker and Chris Evans with traffic cone hats. TFI Friday with a bar in the studio. Cigerettes and alcohol. Sarah Cox with a minging hangover. Johnny Vaughn invents banter. Teddy Sheringham in The Dentists Chair. Lager Lager Lager. James Brown editing Loaded magazine. Before craft beer existed. Tripping over the stairs on your way to pick up a Brit award, clutching a can of Stella. Jimmy Five Bellies. The invention of the alcopop. 6 cans for a fiver. Get it down ya.

rubberdingyrapids
15-03-2016, 06:40 PM
luka you should write a guide to the 1990s

luka
15-03-2016, 06:46 PM
i wanted to do a song called Cool Brittania :cool: over one of Mr Teas tunes. havent got round to it yet

Corpsey
15-03-2016, 08:14 PM
I guffawed at that luka.

The irony being that as a kid I absolutely loved Oasis and Born Slippy and dreamed of drinking lager some fine day

CrowleyHead
17-03-2016, 12:03 AM
Its a little rude for as many of you to think music doesn't matter to young kids as much as it did to you lot. The methods of 'value' have changed a bit, sure, but... This is still pretty life defining stuff for certain people. Not Everyone, but was music of the same value for everyone when it was any other decade? Doubtful.

luka
17-03-2016, 09:09 AM
Mistaken possibly but I'm not sure it's rude. It's not a question of whether individuals still engage meaningfully with music, that's a given its more a question of whether it occupies the same space in the culture. There are people who still read novels, perhaps even passionately, but the novel is culturally irrelevant.

luka
17-03-2016, 09:12 AM
I think political music is a red herring but what did happen was generations expressed their desires through music and and that itself is what changed the culture around them.

Jungle wasn't political but it was a new voice. Grime wasn't political but it was a new voice. Those people hadn't ever been heard before. Hadn't existed before.

CrowleyHead
17-03-2016, 01:02 PM
Mistaken possibly but I'm not sure it's rude. It's not a question of whether individuals still engage meaningfully with music, that's a given its more a question of whether it occupies the same space in the culture. There are people who still read novels, perhaps even passionately, but the novel is culturally irrelevant.

I would say the issue there is the value was inflated to begin with this last century or so when it became a commodity (like all other art forms), and at this point its become soooo consistently wormed into aspects of digestibility.

Admittedly I don't know what the perception is of the presence of music is for your generation or people older, but I want to say its still there. Its just harder to detect overtly as the radio format, with things such as an MTV-style presentation or just regular radio, has been utterly reduced in omnipresence and power moreso for my generation. You hear it in the physical world less, and there's an auditory quality in the naturalization of privatized music; headphones, portable MP3 players, cars are made insular, "noise-cancelling".

Leo
17-03-2016, 03:03 PM
there were fewer distractions for kids in the past, so maybe music filled their time more consistently. we didn't spend hours texting, playing video games, making/watching youtube clips, surfing Facebook/instagram, snapchatting, sending vines, etc. it was pretty much just tv, music and sports when i was going up.

rubberdingyrapids
17-03-2016, 04:03 PM
music, like tv and film is just old media. people will always like music, but the novelty of recorded music is over.

people need to find what the next novel aspect of music might be (that can be commodified). it just needs a new medium/format. something that makes it seem new again, almost. a new way to experience it. or maybe we are already there and im just too old to realise it. its def a massive transitional time though. be interesting to see where we end up.

Corpsey
17-03-2016, 04:52 PM
Yeah, I guess it's obvious music is still important to people - look at the size of companies like Spotify...


Vine seems to be having an influence on music, too:

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/10-songs-that-blew-up-on-vine-in-2015-20151216

Not to be a bore about it but I've noticed on Vine that when even when you record ambient sound, it becomes 'musical' when it loops.

rubberdingyrapids
18-03-2016, 03:06 PM
http://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/mar/17/pop-rock-rap-whatever-who-killed-the-music-genre?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Sleeve+Notes+-+NEW+with+2+editable+regions&utm_term=162603&subid=40319&CMP=ema_630


Last summer, a survey by “millennial insight agency” Ypulse surveyed 1,000 young adults. When asked about their favourite artists, many respondents couldn’t answer, not through ambivalence but because, it was concluded, “this generation is interested in so many music genres and artists”.

It found that while millennials are passionate about music (76% within the 13- to 17-year-old bracket said they wouldn’t be able to last a week without it), 79% of 13- to 32-year-olds said their tastes didn’t fall into one specific music genre. Just 11% said that they only listened to one genre of music. “It seems,” Ypulse noted when it published its findings, “that millennials are a genre-less generation”.

Corpsey
22-03-2016, 03:53 PM
Apparently the big youth trend these days is depression:

http://qz.com/642351/is-the-way-we-parent-causing-a-mental-health-crisis-in-our-kids/

baboon2004
22-03-2016, 04:12 PM
i can't even imagine the spectacularised horror of growing up with social media (obviously there are benefits too), so that figures...

baboon2004
24-03-2016, 12:11 PM
again from the Guardian, which shapes my view of reality to an alarming degree these days. EIther way, it's hard to imagine that this is total bollocks:
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/mar/24/id-rather-chill-in-and-relax-why-millennials-dont-go-clubbing

Posted particularly because of the chilling: “ I think dancing and sweating gross amounts to loud music is good for the soul. But you can now get cheap city breaks for the price of a good night out that you won’t remember in London. And city breaks look better on Instagram.”
I genuinely don't know whether the last line is ironic or not.

Leo
24-03-2016, 02:12 PM
sadly, so much of this is actually accurate...

http://fusion.net/story/283080/nyt-millennial-trend-story/

Mr. Tea
24-03-2016, 02:56 PM
again from the Guardian, which shapes my view of reality to an alarming degree these days.

Christ almighty, man, get out while you still can!

Edit:


There are a lot of reasons why Kaley, 23, doesn’t go clubbing any more. For a start, it’s too expensive, with taxis, door fees and alcohol to pay for. Plus the clubs, even in the capital, are disappointing: they shut at 2am, much earlier than venues in Berlin, and just when you start enjoying yourself it’s lights on.

The cost of clubbing in the UK (and esp. London, obviously) is undeniably ridiculous, but you're clearly not trying hard enough if you can't find a club playing some kind of music you like that stays open any later than 2.

But perhaps I'm just feeling smug because I've got a ticket for World Unknown tonight. :D

Edited edit:


Ruth, 22 from Edinburgh said: “With a competitive work environment and everyone looking for graduate jobs, I cannot imagine turning up to work hungover or tired on a weekday and still performing well enough to get ahead. Going to bars and clubs is too expensive, everyone’s too busy worrying about whether they will ever be able to afford a mortgage or children to throw away money every week on a club.”

Kill me. Please just kill me right now.

Leo, that piece had me in stitches, nice one.

slackk
24-03-2016, 06:56 PM
so this is a thread about old people theorising what's wrong with the kids who they don't know and gauging their opinions from the guardian then?

Corpsey
24-03-2016, 07:30 PM
Yup

And I laid that blueprint out clearly on page 1.

slackk
25-03-2016, 02:28 PM
pretty good

Sectionfive
25-03-2016, 06:08 PM
A lot of the sub-culture tribalness of the past is highly romanticised and exaggerated so most of the comparisons are off to a shaky start to begin with. There are big changes in how people are coming into contact with and consuming music for sure and that is having a new effect that hasn't been sufficiently explained yet. We have probably passed the days of reading interviews where seemingly every DJ "heard their brother's jungle tapes" but kids are still 'discovering' and getting that 'wow'. The big difference is they have the whole history of everything at their finger tips to get hooked on. Top of the Pops died by redundancy after all.

The guardian have been churning seven articles a day for months about 'millennials' but they and most other writers are only ever talking about certain white, educated, person in their twenties. Boomers, Gen X, etc, have been sort of useful in talking about certain trends but have their limits and generational categories are largely bullshit. More often then not because a diverse group of people are being attacked and labelled rather than the world the diverse group of people in the previous generation have left for them.

rubberdingyrapids
30-03-2016, 04:21 PM
the guardian LOVES articles about how things are fucked for millenials (or whatever the group after the millenials is). they are unable to resist repeating how earth-crumblingly terrible it all is for youth of today. which it might be, but i cant help thinking its become its own little cottage industry. older readers get to feel alternately charitable/quietly smug and secretly condescending, younger readers get to, well im not sure what they get out of it, other than a small fee for coughing up their own story of doomed 21st century youth.

as far as music, i think its such a massive change happening right now, that no one can really know where we are going exactly. i remember when soulseek was still new, and how exciting it was to have all that music available, and get into genres i prob wouldnt have been able to properly hear otherwise. i cant imagine what it must be like to be a kid living with that x10. but its prob not terrible. at all. it might just be a bit dwarfing. though whether they are even aware of this, im not sure. and for the accusations that they are simply being 'recreative' rather than creative, which i think myself sometimes, most of the biggest music around right now just doesnt sound like its simply rehashing. you would not have had records like the life of pablo, young thug, drake even, for example 10 years ago. the recombinant thing is very of the moment. it just requires a diff criteria to measure its worth p'raps.



again from the Guardian, which shapes my view of reality to an alarming degree these days.

at least read the economist or new statesman or something, from time to time. :P

rubberdingyrapids
30-03-2016, 04:44 PM
sadly, so much of this is actually accurate...

http://fusion.net/story/283080/nyt-millennial-trend-story/


“When it comes down to it, life is really all about finding a hashtag for yourself and sending hilarious emoji on Venmo,” Packard said, and then, after a moment of reflection, added: “Lena Dunham.”


this like a funnier version of a tao lin book.

rubberdingyrapids
01-04-2016, 11:26 AM
the future.


YouTube gaming sensation KSI, recently signed to Island Records/Universal Music, has announced the launch of his new mobile App. The App has been created by Disciple Media. It will launch in April this year, ahead of KSI’s debut Single release this summer. The single follows KSI’s debut EP (featuring JME among others) which earlier this year debuted at no. 1 on the UK iTunes Albums charts and no. 13 in the official UK Albums Charts.

YouTube phenomenon KSI is the most viewed in the UK, has over 2.5 Billion video views and over 15m subscribers over his two channels - an audience built through viral content, online gaming and savvy brand partnerships. In launching this App, KSI further proves he is at the forefront of next generation media moguls.

The App is ‘one spot for all things KSI’ right at the cutting edge of smartphone tech it delivers unparalleled direct-to-fan access, connecting him with his millions of fans. It features real-time live streaming, brand new music, exclusive videos, audio and images, fan chats/Q&As, App-commerce, pre-sale and tour ticketing, special competitions, App-only merchandise, friending and messaging, a meme generator, social media aggregation and more.

Founder and CEO of Disciple Media, Benji Vaughan, said:

”Working with a young, British, YouTube-entrepreneur is such a rewarding experience. KSI is supremely talented in creating viral content that resonates worldwide, and we can’t wait to support him as he takes his unique personality, into the mobile app space. His community is going to go bonkers and we expect many other YouTubers will be following his lead this year”.

rubberdingyrapids
01-04-2016, 03:11 PM
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/0555e320-e5f7-11e5-a09b-1f8b0d268c39.html


Clarke always confounded British culture. As a working-class director whose projects were sometimes about the working class, there were attempts to box him up as another Ken Loach, a poet of the kitchen sink. But Clarke’s worldview was too singular for that. His politics were leftwing, but unruly. Danny Boyle remembered Clarke advising him to read The Sun rather than The Guardian (with the latter, “you always know what they’re gonna say”).

Corpsey
01-04-2016, 03:55 PM
Is The Sun unpredictable?

rubberdingyrapids
01-04-2016, 05:38 PM
no. but the sun does have better headlines.

Leo
18-04-2016, 09:01 PM
The Teenagers Shaping Pop

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/04/25/the-teenagers-shaping-pop

Corpsey
27-04-2016, 11:24 AM
Does anyone on here HAVE kids? What do they listen to?

I often grapple with the question of whether my taste was purer in the days when I thought the Outhere Brothers were the pinnacle of electronic dance music.

CrowleyHead
27-04-2016, 01:35 PM
All due respect Corpse, its a weird concept to me to crowdsource your friend's kids. Go for it, don't get me wrong but its a weird maturation thing to me that like "Well I don't want to be on the same page of taste as kids, that'd odd. I'd have been so tired if random adults who were friends of my parents confirmed the worth of what I like." Its one thing for kids to go through mom and dad's music, and find older things they like, or have that connection with your parents through a band/artist/song... whatever. To have your parents peers gravitating to what you like, or trying to pin what you like down, it would make the kids want to withdraw their taste.

Corpsey
27-04-2016, 01:43 PM
I'm not trying to stamp my approval on anything, I'm just intrigued.

https://lepetitsmudge.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/4391651_700b.jpg

rubberdingyrapids
27-04-2016, 02:13 PM
im sure you know dissensus is not a forum of teenagers and prob not the best place to find out. also, im not sure i really believe you dont know what kids like. you review rap records. that should give you a clue. im sure you can do some kids-tastes e-snooping. its what the net was made for ;)

Leo
27-04-2016, 03:32 PM
i was recently kind of surprised to find that my 12 and 14 year old nephew and niece had fairly banal, super mainstream tastes in music. they're what i'd loosely describe as "cool" kids in terms of dress and attitude, figured maybe they'd be interested in or at least aware of slightly less mainstream artists (i dunno, maybe grimes or other indie-leaning people) but turned out their phones were full of gaga, bieber, beyonce, etc.

CrowleyHead
27-04-2016, 11:11 PM
im sure you know dissensus is not a forum of teenagers and prob not the best place to find out. also, im not sure i really believe you dont know what kids like. you review rap records. that should give you a clue. im sure you can do some kids-tastes e-snooping. its what the net was made for ;)

Yeah, I mean I'm still in school so talking to my classmates despite being more than a few years seperated from them is indicative my taste and theirs aren't adherent (nor need they be), but I don't see the point of being like "YO WHAT Y'ALL LISTENING TO MAN, KEEP ME ON THE PULSE. I NEED THIS TO PAY THE PHONE BILL. :eek:"

soul_pill
28-04-2016, 06:39 AM
I've got 4 kids, the eldest is 20 and not really into much music. Last time I probed he said he liked Ben Frost and Tim Hecker, but he doesn't really like to talk to me. !4 y/o into a sort of breaks/edm hybrid stuff which sounds pretty obnoxious, all breakdowns and fills.

rubberdingyrapids
16-06-2016, 12:04 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07ffkhz




Young people today drink and smoke much less than previous generations. The rates of teenage pregnancy and youth crime have fallen dramatically. New Statesman editor Jason Cowley talks to experts to find out what is shaping the attitudes and choices of young people today. He grew up in Harlow in Essex during a time of particular social unrest. He returns to his former sixth-form college where he meets a group of students who are markedly more conformist and disciplined than his generation, but more anxious too. So what accounts for this change in young people's behaviour? Is it economic pressures, government policy or the fear of transgressors being shamed on social media? Will we continue to see the rise of a generation of New Young Fogeys?