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Woebot
16-05-2005, 10:43 AM
Simon tried to slip this in at the RIU&SA panel, claiming that of the post-punk brigade (and indeed beyond that in the entire field of music) only Bono and his gang have managed to keep alive the link between Music and Life. So cheeky! It would have made the perfect point for a spectacular flare-up, but strangely no-one rose to the bait. Bit of a mind-bomb that one blissblogger!

But let's face it, he's right. I've never once bought a U2 record but I'll concede (not even grudgingly) that U2 are alone in imagining a word where music matters outside the domain of sound. OK I admire Grime for something like similar reasons, it has ceased its own methods of production and created its own fantastic disorientating spectacle, but even though its politicised its politics (here in the broadest sense) appear to say a different thing. I wonder if i'll feel the same way about Grime when IT IS as big as Hip-Hop (aw, probably i suppose!)

But U2! You've got to give them credit. Its one thing to hate on the catholic church quite another to actually meet the Pope and level with him (though naturally some might see that as appeasement, but for my money having a quiet meeting with Murdoch would have a stronger effect of the direction and behaviour of the global media than bombing SKY, thats not compromise in my book). And say what you like about crass charity records, Bono's done as much as he could have done for Africa and the Third World Debt.

I reckon he's pretty bloody cool. And you know what, to boot, i thought they're latest single, the one where they're all standing on what looks like some desert flats and some vaste shapeshiting wind is smearing them downstream at 200mph while they churn a quite fantastic-sounding bit of Hero-era Neu! Well I thought it was excellent.

borderpolice
16-05-2005, 12:08 PM
I reckon he's pretty bloody cool.

wasn't it the U2 lawsuit against negativeland that destroyed SST records?

martin
16-05-2005, 12:23 PM
I get their songs in my head quite a lot, "A Celebration" was really good. Most of my friends when I was a young teenager were second generation Irish, so there was a lot of U2 / Pogues / Simple Minds (sorry, but this band are complete SHIT and nothing will change my opinion on that one) / Hothouse Flowers (ditto) / Therapy? banter. I like U2 in the same way I like Jamiroquai, I'd never think I did, but when one of their songs comes on the radio or the dancefloor (look, I'm not cool enough to go to Fabric) I find it quite enjoyable.

True story - me and a friend and his sister were crossing a road in Dublin, and Bono was coming the other way - he obviously thought we were trying to avoid him as he snapped "I hate it when people do that" in a loud voice. A while after, he did some interview where he was talking about people in Dublin blanking him cos he's successful, or cos they didn't want him to think they knew he was successful...whatever

Other funny Bono story - Feargal Sharkey banging on U2's dressing room door, going apeshit, screaming "Come out of there!" after they'd performed 'Sunday Bloody Sunday' on the tube. Again, I don't know why, unless he considered it was making light of the event

k-punk
16-05-2005, 12:37 PM
Simon tried to slip this in at the RIU&SA panel, claiming that of the post-punk brigade (and indeed beyond that in the entire field of music) only Bono and his gang have managed to keep alive the link between Music and Life. So cheeky! It would have made the perfect point for a spectacular flare-up, but strangely no-one rose to the bait. Bit of a mind-bomb that one blissblogger!

But let's face it, he's right. I've never once bought a U2 record but I'll concede (not even grudgingly) that U2 are alone in imagining a word where music matters outside the domain of sound. OK I admire Grime for something like similar reasons, it has ceased its own methods of production and created its own fantastic disorientating spectacle, but even though its politicised its politics (here in the broadest sense) appear to say a different thing. I wonder if i'll feel the same way about Grime when IT IS as big as Hip-Hop (aw, probably i suppose!)

But U2! You've got to give them credit. Its one thing to hate on the catholic church quite another to actually meet the Pope and level with him (though naturally some might see that as appeasement, but for my money having a quiet meeting with Murdoch would have a stronger effect of the direction and behaviour of the global media than bombing SKY, thats not compromise in my book). And say what you like about crass charity records, Bono's done as much as he could have done for Africa and the Third World Debt.

I reckon he's pretty bloody cool. And you know what, to boot, i thought they're latest single, the one where they're all standing on what looks like some desert flats and some vaste shapeshiting wind is smearing them downstream at 200mph while they churn a quite fantastic-sounding bit of Hero-era Neu! Well I thought it was excellent.

What is the supposed connection between the empty, flaccid pomposity of U2's music and 'life'? The point about postpunk was not that it was transcendently political (i.e. that it urges you to action after listening to it) but that it directly acted upon you - posing all sorts of question about the relationship between formal reinvention and political transformation. The relationship between U2's tedious old man r and r posturing and their 'concern' is entirely transcendent - buy this hyper-predictable commodity and also get to feel good about yourself...

U2 - including their 'concern for third world debt' - are capitalist ideology in itself, hawking the absurd notion that third world debt is some contingent accident rather than a necessary and inevitable consequence of capitalism. Bono is no different to Gordon Brown, an apologist for and defender of the existing world order whose reformist moralising serves both to lower expectations (all we can expect is some modest 'reforms' of the system) and to conceal the real political situation beneath layers of mystificatory, simplifying, personalist nonsense (if only people were less gwwweeeeedy).

The notion that the world is improved by U2 is the best ever argument for nihilism. Surely better a destroyed or worsened world than one in which we have to put up with their bluster.

U2 are the anti-punk. Only when they are universally lambasted, only when it is as embarrassing to listen to them as it was to listen to ELP in 1977, will we begin to reclaim any of the ground corporate rock has won since the demise of postpunk.

(Obv the comparison with ELP is unfair to ELP; even they didn't pretend to be hip and relevant twenty five years into their miserable career....)

Diggedy Derek
16-05-2005, 12:37 PM
I'm astonished that Woebot's post is not some sort of obscure satire. I mean this is U2. Everytime I see Bono, I want to punch him. Their best album by far, Achtung Baby, is still absolutely awful (go, on listen to it!).

I mean, U2. Really?

k-punk
16-05-2005, 12:39 PM
I like U2 in the same way I like Jamiroquai,

case closed m'lud.

k-punk
16-05-2005, 12:42 PM
I'm astonished that Woebot's post is not some sort of obscure satire.

Surely it is... like Mr Agreeable in reverse.... take a loathsome, obviously oppressive corporate rock monstrosity of no conceivable merit and make a case for them....

Rambler
16-05-2005, 12:58 PM
"Waves that leave me out of reach
Breaking on your back like a beach."

For that single lyric alone U2 should be damned to all eternity.

3underscore
16-05-2005, 12:58 PM
The topic of U2 will pretty normally get a rise out of me, so I don't see why I should make this occassion an exception. The primary rise is the matter of confusion between U2 keeping Life and Music together, or the actual act of one individual using/abusing his fame to push political issues. U2's career of songs actually meaning anything political really ended in their early years - Sunday Bloody Sunday era I would hazard a guess (I am no U2 fan, or record owner, so any obsessive can take me to task if they choose).

No U2 work since Rattle & Hum has struck me of being of any particular comment whatsoever. They are being misaligned with bono's constant self-promotion and charity work (when have Clayton, Mullen Jr or The Edge been seen giving a shit about Bono's campaigning?!?). A cynic would suggest that Bono clearly identified from the moment Band Aid launched his band to the big time that being involved in charity (especially "confrontational" artistic charity going against governments) sells a shitload of records. And hence, his campaigning was born.


say what you like about crass charity records, Bono's done as much as he could have done for Africa and the Third World Debt.

Maybe so, but no more so than the poor student who gives up their time to work at oxfam. Bono makes serious cash indirectly through his public campaigning, surely?

gabriel
16-05-2005, 01:03 PM
A cynic would suggest that Bono clearly identified from the moment Band Aid launched his band to the big time that being involved in charity (especially "confrontational" artistic charity going against governments) sells a shitload of records. And hence, his campaigning was born.

indeed. nothing i've ever seen bono say or do has made me think for one second that he's a nice, caring, thoughtful person who really gives a shit about the charity stuff that he does. (i'm not saying he doesn't, but he's certainly never convinced me the other way). i've always just thought of him as a smug, self-promoting, arrogant cunt.

musically though, the jamiroquai comparison is spot on - i've always wanted to hate all their songs though will occasionally find a few of them to be quite good...

martin
16-05-2005, 01:09 PM
Maybe so, but no more so than the poor student who gives up their time to work at oxfam. Bono makes serious cash indirectly through his public campaigning, surely?

How many students give up their time to work for Oxfam? None of the fuckers I've ever encountered!

Rachel Verinder
16-05-2005, 01:15 PM
I should impartially point out that U2 were directly responsible for the ruination of a genuinely great group - Simple Minds. After Kerr took that walk on the beach with Bono and decided to degenerate from New Gold Dream to U3, the Minds were aesthetically done for, though sadly and immensely successful commercially as a result. Have you heard "Speed Your Love To Me" recently? It's the sound of New Pop being strangled, or drowned in a sweaty Linn drum tsunami.

k-punk
16-05-2005, 01:32 PM
Yes: everything falsely claimed on of U2 - that they muster a panoramic, widescreen vastness - was actually true of Simple Minds circa New Gold Dream. Post NGD, Simple Minds managed the considerable achievement of sounding even more pompous and bloated than U2.

But at least they didn't have Bono.

ladyboygrimsby
16-05-2005, 01:42 PM
I once spent the day with U2 when I found The Edge lost outside the hotel I was working in, well before they were famous (they were promoting their first album in Switzerland). I'd seen them play the night before. I took him back to his hotel and spent the whole afternoon sat in the bar with them. Even then Bono was an insufferably pompous wanker and no one even knew who the fuck he was. The Edge, in contrast, was lovely.

The reason Bono gets on so well with politicians is because he's like one himself. His songs are full of opaquely bland statements that sound grand but are in fact empty of all meaning.

However, you can't not like I Will Follow or that one he wrote about Michael Hutchence (Stuck In A Lift That You Can't Get Out Of?)

HMGovt
16-05-2005, 01:51 PM
U2 = sanitised rock for girls who keep ponies and boys who part their hair.

The desert video was OK but it's a shame the concept was wasted on such puffed-up, meretricious nonsense.

ladyboygrimsby
16-05-2005, 01:52 PM
(Obv the comparison with ELP is unfair to ELP; even they didn't pretend to be hip and relevant twenty five years into their miserable career....)

PS Check out From The Beginning on Trilogy. Fine bit of CSNY-style Moogy soul.

jenks
16-05-2005, 07:57 PM
surely part of their problem is their desperate search for 'authenticity' (they mean it, man, they are not afraid to show they have emotions,... , really they do blah- the striving for 'real'emotions) when in fact is all we have is bloat.

they've tried irony, appropriation of blues/gospel, they've even gone for eno swathes of ambience (unforgettable fire being about the only listenable thing they've done) and what have they come back to time and again, big guitars and empty gestures in stadia.

the bono speech at the labour conference manged to be both incredibly arrogant (i'm not used to playing such small venues) whilst also being fawning and nauseating (brown and blair as lennon and macartney) giving tony a patina of good old rock'n'roll rebellion.

bono has used his public face to get famine issues raised in unlikely places but all the time he is gaining kudos (and record sales) as a direct result and still perpetuating hoary old rock cliches(including wearing some very bad hats) shit he was even on the front of the observer food magazine yesterday.

francesco
16-05-2005, 08:17 PM
"The Unforgettable Fire", love or hate it, is one of the key record to understand the '80.

From a personal point of view i love of that records the Eno production and the guitar landscapes of the Edge. Pity the rhythm section is inane and the singer is a idiot....

k-punk
16-05-2005, 09:33 PM
"The Unforgettable Fire", love or hate it, is one of the key record to understand the '80.
.

Yes, and the Final Solution, love it or hate it, is one of the key political policies to understand the 1930s.

mms
16-05-2005, 09:59 PM
i think they were victims of their own success really. i think they could have been more exciting if they didn't colmpletely believe in their own righteous brilliance.
you can't deny edges guitar sound is his own and very memorable, you know their instruments are tuned down at least a semi tone i think it is, so the clangourous resonance is uniquely theirs.
I think the reason for this is cos bono can't sing in tune tho.
edge looked like he had it in him to go out on the hoof a bit, he with arthur russell and holger cuzay in the early 80's didn't he?
each time they have a new album out they endlessly repeat versions of the songs '20th century boy' and 'all day and all of the night' like an undergrad student who writes out a sentence they have read, in their own words without really understanding the original,with some uninteresting ballads in between.


god knows who buys it, i used to live over a guy who really really loved them, imagine the fun i had with the bass boost on my stereo !!

francesco
16-05-2005, 10:22 PM
Yes, and the U2, love it or hate it, are one of the key to understand the final solution:



Manifesto of the Templars of the Christian Brotherhood


Yours truly, King Saint, the current Grand Master of the TCB, found Apocalypse of the King while visiting Joshua Tree National Monument in California on April 4, 1997. It was written on a scroll and sealed in a bottle. It was signed by Elvis Aaron Presley. The angel told me to write this manifesto for the Templars of the Christian Brotherhood. This is a secret society that was originally formed by Elvis and his minions, the Memphis Mafia. Elvis was the first Grand Master of the TCB. Elvis and the Memphis Mafia combated one of the incarnations of the Helter Skelter Conspiracy. Back then, the main conspirators included Charles Manson and the Beatles. Today, the main conspirators are neo-nazis, white supremacists, and members of the order of the Ku Klux Klan (nwo's). Helter Skelter must be defeated -- members and friends of the TCB unite!


Helter Skelter Conspiracy
This is the "mother of all conspiracy theories." The Helter Skelter Conspiracy began when the Great Dragon, that serpent of old, whose name is Satan, or the Devil, was thrown down to earth after losing a war with the angel of Israel, the renown archangel Michael. The Great Dragon was furious and waged war on Israel for giving birth to Yeshua HaMashiach, the son of Prime Mover. One of the main phases of the conspiracy involved the fallen angel or demon of Germany, whose name in Hebrew is Abaddon. The goal of this phase of Helter Skelter was to eradicate the sons and daughters of Israel so that the Aryan headed New World Order would establish a satanic millennium known as the Third Reich. One of the results of this phase, the Holocaust, was the consequence of a war between Abaddon and Michael in which Michael was severely injured. However, Michael was rescued by the two angels who are referred to as the "Two Great Eagle's Wings". These two angels are Ephraim, the angel of Great Britian, and Manasseh, the angel of America. This explains why the British and the Americans defeated the Germans in World War II and put a final end to Hitler's final solution.

The Templars of the Christian Brotherhood are meant to be the good counterpart to the many evil occult secret societies active before the rise of Nazi Germany, such as the Order of the New Templars and the Ordo Templi Orientis. These secret societies were responsible for much of the racist ideology that paved the way for the Holocaust. The Nazi's borrowed the swastika from the emblem of the Order of the New Templars. An influential figure for the racist thinking of these societies came from Madame Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, the founder of the Theosophical Society. Elvis, who thought his mother Gladys resembled Blavatsky, read Blavatsky and many other occultists and New Agers in order to better understand the historical dimensions of Helter Skelter.


The Beatles were from Liverpool, the name which appeared on the RMS Titanic, which hit an iceberg on April 14, the same date Abraham Lincoln was shot, and sank on April 15, the same date Abraham Lincoln died. The Titanic was a warning, a prophetic metaphor, how quickly the United States could sink into the moral abyss. Also, the Beatles were given instructions from Abaddon, the demon of Germany, while they were performing in Hamburg, Germany.


Elvis and the Memphis Mafia, working as the Templars of the Christian Brotherhood, were successful in exposing and defeating the Manson phase of Helter Skelter. Elvis modeled some of his public persona after the comic book hero Captain Marvel Jr., who even resembles Elvis. After being named one of the 1970 young men of the year by the national organization of the Junior Chambers of Commerce, Elvis stated in his acceptance speech that he was always the hero of the comic books he read. The comic book character Captain Marvel Jr. himself first appeared during World War II. The young man Freddy Freeman became Captain Marvel Jr. after he was injured during an attack by Captain Nazi. The lightning bolt in Elvis' TCB logo comes from the lightning bolt on the front of Captain Marvel Jr.'s costume and is also supposed to be the good counterpart to the evil double sig rune of the nazi SS.


Elvis had met with President Richard Nixon in order to infiltrate the FBI. Elvis wanted to wage a war on drugs, not only because drugs were morally corrupting America's youth, but also because he discovered an FBI plot to keep blacks down by getting them addicted to drugs. The plot, known as operation "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", involved the Beatles.

U2

It is no accident that Apocalypse of the King was found in Joshua Tree National Monument. The apocalypse is dated March 17, 1977. What is interesting about this date is that the Irish rock band U2's The Joshua Tree album was released March 17, 1987, Saint Patrick's Day. U2, the "Anti-Beatles", are prophets whose mission is to expose Helter Skelter. The rock band Rush, in their song "Mission" from the album Hold Your Fire, attest to U2's mission. On their The Unforgettable Fire album, U2 feature two members of the American Trinity. The song "Elvis Presley and America" is immediately followed by the last song "MLK". U2 warn that America is under attack by demonic forces and that Americans need to be morally wide awake.

In their movie Rattle and Hum, U2 pay homage to Elvis by visiting Graceland and they shot their video to "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" in Las Vegas. Also, once before U2 performed the song "Helter Skelter", Bono claimed that he was stealing it back from Manson. A cartoon Elvis also appears in U2's video "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" -- driving a car with a license plate that reads "ELVIN2U". It is also in this same video that one of Bono's alter egos is reading C.S. Lewis' "Screwtape Letters", a book written from the evil perspective. Just as C.S. Lewis takes the perspective of an evil demon to teach his readers spiritual lessons, so Bono takes the perspective of an evil character to teach his audience about Helter Skelter. Bono even ended one of his concerts dressed as a devil singing the song with which Elvis always ended his concerts, "Can't Help Falling in Love". In the song "Until the End of the World", from Achtung Baby, Bono takes the persona of Judas, the disciple who betrayed Yeshua HaMashiach.

The album The Joshua Tree is about America and her problems in the face of Helter Skelter. Achtung Baby and Zooropa are about the evil New World Order. It is well known that the European Union, whose flag appears on the cover of Zooropa, is the fabled Beast of Revelation 13. U2 almost broke up when they made the mistake of recording some of Achtung Baby in Berlin.


Jesse Garon Presley
Satan tried to kill Elvis at birth but killed Elvis' twin brother Jesse Garon instead not realizing that Gladys gave birth to twins. This is how Elvis escaped the clutches of death. Both Jesse and Elvis are sons of Israel by flesh. Also, Elvis died reading A Scientific Search for the Face of Jesus, a book about the Turin shroud. This was not coincidental, since Elvis was a disciple of Yeshua HaMashiach and legend has it that the original Templars possessed the shroud.

Jesse Garon Presley is the Jesse figure in that he is a relative of Elvis, the King David figure (see Bono's poem which refers to Elvis as the American David).


Elvis was the King, Martin was named King.
Elvis died in Memphis, Martin died in Memphis.

The evil powers took the offensive in 1967 and 1968. Baldur attacked Manasseh and The Dragon Satan attacked Michael. First, the European Economic Community was formed on July 1, 1967. The Beatles and the Rolling Stones inspired by Abaddon, went about corrupting the youth of America and Britian. It was in 1967 that the Stones' album Their Satanic Majesties' Request and the Beatles' album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band appeared. It was in 1968 that the Stones' song "Sympathy for the Devil" and the Beatles' White album appeared. It was also in 1967 that the forces of evil attacked Israel in the Six Day War. Elvis and the TCB defeated the Stones' and Beatles' attack and Israel was victorious in the Six Day War. Not coincidentally, Hell's Angels were responsible for a murder during a Stones peformance at Altamount on December 6, 1969. It was at Altamont where Mick Jagger took on the personality of the Devil during the performance of "Sympathy for the Devil".

King Saint
The current Grand Master of the TCB, yours truly, King Saint, is leading a covert operation, known as Operation 90581, the goal of which is to recover the great Ark of the Covenant. There is an Israeli secret society, whose name is Operation Ortal, which is cooperating with Operation 90581.

The TCB too, are in search of the Ark and it is not an accident that I was visited by the angel of America while gazing upon the Hale-Bopp comet, because it is thought that the last appearance of that comet occurred at the time that King Solomon's Temple was dedicated and when the Ark was placed in the Holy of Holies. Also, the secret word of Captain Marvel Jr., SHAZAM, refers to one human and five gods -- the human being none other than King Solomon:

Solomon
Hercules
Atlas
Zeus
Achilles
Mercury

If A=100, B==101, etc., then:

H = 107
I = 108
T = 119
L = 111
E = 104
R = 117
666


Shalom,
King Saint
Grand Master of the TCB
April 6, 1997

egg
17-05-2005, 02:44 AM
getting debt cancelled is good

some music (earlier I think) had feeling

michael
17-05-2005, 04:53 AM
I presume a British show called 'Get Up Stand Up' has screened in the UK already?

On the weekend just past an episode screened here about the rise of huge charity gigs, starting with George Harrison's Bangladesh benefit in '71.

Sir Bob Geldof and Mr Bono Vox appeared extensively (unsurprisingly) and it was really interesting to me, wrt why Bono is so annoying. I've seen Geldof in a few interviews over the last couple of months and he strikes me as disarmingly honest. In this show he was talking about how he met some big politician (missed who) via Band Aid and called him a "murdering cunt".

Meanwhile Bono was saying the two of them play good cop bad cop, how he has great respect for the head of the World Bank ("a perfect gentleman") and had to placate the man while Bob had him against the wall trying to strangle him, and most crucially how he sees himself as a salesman and deal maker.

So basically, yeah, as someone said upthread, he is a politician. Or more accurately he plays the same games, wrt PR spiels and deal making.

On an emotional level, there's something I find really unpleasant about that, whatever end he's aiming towards.

On a practical level, i.e. if you accept how things are, Bob's righteous rage might not instigate as much change as Bono's snake oil, but it's much more exciting to watch someone genuinely agitating, at least being really honest and passionate. Geldof asked rhetorically why he should mince his words, pointing out he is not a politician and doesn't care what politicans think of him.

Could say more, but that'll do for now. I don't know social theory and stuff so I have no idea what most dissensus contributors are on about when the topic moves from music. :)


...

In other news, I have to admit I quite like U2's music. My wife has a couple of their albums and I've owned other albums of theirs as a teenager. If someone were laying into the band I'd happily join in or at the least laugh along at the mocking. However, if an album was playing on the stereo I would only change it if I preferred to hear something else (not because I couldn't stand it being on).

zhao
17-05-2005, 06:26 AM
hello everyone. my first post here. this was the first thread I clicked on.

Simon needs to check his head. any "charity" on the part of the west toward parts of the world devastated and changed for the worse by imperialism just stinks of hypocracy and self agrandisement. it's like patting yourself on the back for bringing flowers to someone who's legs you broke. European and American complicity in the problems in 3rd world countries cannot be covered up by some god-awful rock concert spectacle.

"the west won the world in the past few hundred years not by its profundity of thought or depth of understanding, but by it's ruthless use of technology toward violence" (or something like that) - I forget where I read it or who said it.

when I was 14 I liked "Boy" and "War". last I heard those albums was when I was about 16. I think this band's trajectory is all down hill from the first album onwards.

did anyone make any sense of that giant consipiracy post above?

Randy Watson
17-05-2005, 08:56 AM
you can't deny edges guitar sound is his own

I can't remember who it was ( it might have been John Lydon) who used to say that Edge ripped his sound off Keith Levene.

I'm quite partial to Unforgettable Fire and Achtung Baby. Rattle and Hum is one of the worst records I've ever heard - utterly misguided in every way.

jed_
17-05-2005, 12:42 PM
re. simple minds, Jim Kerr even started speaking with an Irish accent.

Woebot
17-05-2005, 04:32 PM
The notion that the world is improved by U2 is the best ever argument for nihilism. Surely better a destroyed or worsened world than one in which we have to put up with their bluster.

(rolls on the floor, sides splitting)

aw, they're not THAT bad! i can't for the life of me envision Bono as "the enemy". i can't take him too seriously actually. i certainly don't find him threatening (not that anyone here seems to either...do they really?) i think he's OK, i think he's some kind of force for good, even if that wouldn't be my chosen way of dealing with the situation (picturing himself behind enormous teak desk sucking cigar pondering the world's ills)

arent people being a little quick to dismiss them JUST BECAUSE they represent Daily Mail/Q rock? cant we be a little more warm-hearted to this gang of blarney rapscallions? it doesnt mean we have to buy their records and not arthur russells!

Grievous Angel
17-05-2005, 09:35 PM
God, I hated U2 SO MUCH. I thought they were THE WORST BAND IN THE WORLD. Pompous, asinine, flatulent, wholesome... everything I hate about rock. Must have despised them utterly for at least ten years -- 79 to 89, maybe longer.

But the wife liked them, couldn't understand why I couldn't bear their music, why I found it utterly intolerable and HAD to leave the room when they were playing. So, slowly, she started drup-drip-dripping bits of them to me when I wasn't paying attention. And in the end I had to admit that some of their stuff was OK. A bit.

Eventually, I had to concede that I liked the tunes, dammit! Actually, I had to admit to myself that I thought that some of the tunes were absolutely bloody fantastic. Whole albums in fact. The Unforgettable Fire, Zooropa, the Rattle and Hum video... lots of stuff. I wound up going to see them and they were great. Along the way I did some strategy work for their studio.

And as far as the debt relief stuff goes, more power to his elbow, I think.

U2 are OK, for me.

mms
17-05-2005, 09:42 PM
I can't remember who it was ( it might have been John Lydon) who used to say that Edge ripped his sound off Keith Levene.

as much as i like keith levene's sound its very different i think .
the edge is all in the detuned delay in his lead and also his lush rhythm playing

Randy Watson
18-05-2005, 09:01 AM
as much as i like keith levene's sound its very different i think .
the edge is all in the detuned delay in his lead and also his lush rhythm playing

I think the quote was more to do with the early, "edgier" sound :o . The delay and lush rhythm thing seemed to develop through Unforgettable Fire with Eno producing. Lanios also quite influential I think. Not to take away from Edge.

I think the lydon quote is more to do with October, War & Boy (think I Will Follow).

redcrescent
19-05-2005, 11:13 PM
edge looked like he had it in him to go out on the hoof a bit, he with arthur russell and holger cuzay in the early 80's didn't he?
Absolutely. I rate that Wobble/Edge/Czukay EP, actually. Listen 'ere (http://www.tigersushi.com/site/frameset.jsp?page=Art.jsp&ArtId=6341).
There's a Francois Kevorkian dub of "Snake Charmer" on the CD that comes with the Last Night a DJ Saved My Life book, and it's mighty fine.

robin
20-05-2005, 02:07 PM
woebot i suspect that if you lived in ireland for a while and had to put up with the ubiquity of bono right across all forms of media here you'd realise what an insufferable prick he is

Elan
14-06-2005, 03:57 PM
An article I read in, of all places, <i>Time</i> talked about how Bono & The Edge played their new songs for their non-pseudonymed rhythm section and they basically told them to take 'em back to the shop until they were more cheery/rocking songs that could actually be played in stadia around the world. It could well be that U2 are stuck doing what they do and can't be avant-garde/interesting at all, or they aren't willing to take that risk.

Bono is oily, or maybe he thinks of himself as the honey that draws more flies, or something. He seems to hit the news here more as a quasi-political figure - 'Bono pressures the G8' - and is only secondarily that guy who sings for U2.

Re: Simple Minds - I like Jim Kerr's voice a lot more than Bono's and back in the 80s (I even include the maligned <I>Sparkle in the Rain</i>!) they were the better band by far.