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baboon2004
08-11-2004, 09:46 PM
I am now totally sold on Miami bass, after belatedly discovering it by following my way back through crunk's family tree. A lot of this stuff stands up really well when compared with the 'mainstream' hip-hop of the time, seemingly occurring contemporaneously in a parallel universe up north and out west. I'd always wondered what became of electro's innovations until Drexciya etc appeared to resurrect them in the '90s, and now I know. By part spooky electro, by part crazy party music, this stuff, well, rocks.

My tunes of choice:

DJ Magic Mike and MC Tomey B - Drop the Bass
Anything by Maggotron (including a crazy cover of Brian Wilson's 'Caroline, No')
Dynamix II - Just give the DJ a Break

and, I've just got hold of a Dynamix ii 'Electro Megamix' full-length that is blowing my mind as we speak. :)

Some of this stuff reminds me of 'ardkore reflected through a Floridian prism... it has the same 'throw everything together' vitality, absolute disregard for tastefulness, and the pursuit of the ultimate rush-trigger is mirrored in the pursuit of the deepest bass. Anyone else on here bitten by the Miami bass bug?

nomos
08-11-2004, 10:19 PM
I've got an AWOL set from 1993 that's pretty hectic and thrown together at times. GQ keeps saying "you'll never hear music like this again." At one point he shouts out to "the Miami crew" and says "when you go home you can tell your friends about this." I've always wondered if they did and if anything came of it.

Anyway, I've been getting interested in the Bass too, through various round about channels. I have no idea where to start though. Any suggestions would be welcomed.

blissblogger
08-11-2004, 10:32 PM
saw a documentary on MTV2 recently, on the history of Southern hip hop, and the most interesting bit for me was that they have pirate radio in Florida and it plays a big role with Miami bass.

There's pirate radio stations all over America but i've generally got the impression that they're mostly small-range leftist political ones, radio samizdat type thing. # these pirates in Miami are the only ones i've heard of in America that correspond to the role of pirates in the hardcore continuum sense London style. perhaps there are others though all over the dutty south and even in other places playing street beats type stuff that's not on the commercial radio stations. although the street rap end of things gets quite well catered for with Hot 95 being franchised all over the country so there's possibly not the structural need for pirates, plus radiospace being so hotly chased and so much money in it here that they really crack down on piracy i imagine.

# (there was a pirate in williamsburg in brooklyn actually that was music but that was more on the Resonance/esoteric college radio type vibe -- i djed on it once which was a buzz cos i could say 'i've djed on pirate radio' but it wasn't exactly the spliff haze/guys in bombers jackets with rottweilers fantasy i had in mind -- the guy before me was playing anthony braxton!)

redcrescent
08-11-2004, 11:32 PM
The Ten Commandments of Bass (http://www.vinylvulture.co.uk/pages/miami-bass.htm). (Thank you, Tom!)

My top Miami Bass boys are Pretty Tony, MC ADE and DJ Magic Mike. And Luke Skyywalker, DXJ and Calvin Mills II as producers.

Full length: MC ADE's first album, Techmaster PEB's It came from outer bass (Newtone, 1990), Bose Rock the world (more electro than Bass, but dope), 2 Live Crew Is what we are (you gotta have it), MC Cool Rock & MC Chaszy C Boot the booty (Vision 1986, w. Half Pint and Magic Mike)...

Compilations (on Pandisc/Jamarc): The Bass that ate Miami , Miami Bass Wars and Miami Bass Express are all good.

Heard some DJ drop L'Trimm's "Cars that go boom" into his set a while ago and it sounded fresh still. The new/old Brazilian funky do morro stuff is fantastic, too. Infinitely preferable to things like DJ Assault/DJ Godfather/most "booty bass".
Anyone heard stuff on Touchin' Bass? Some absolutely lethal things (Chaotic State, Bass Junkie, Hydraulix...).

(I just remembered Dave Tompkins' immortal assertion that "Ass is such a big part of Bass." Brilliant.)

Hadean
09-11-2004, 01:30 AM
Techmaster PEB = Patrick Baker - mad scotsman, part of Sarasota lore

he was recommending the first Run DMC and LL Cool J's <i>Radio</i> to me in 1984/85
soon he cofounded Newtown records and became one of the original BASS pioneers!

working in a phone shop when I first met him, everybody now: "I am the op-e-ra-tor..."

puretokyo
09-11-2004, 01:50 AM
Ed DMX drops some great little gems on the Breakin' label, and Rephlex released a Dynamix II comp a few years back. Everything connects up, doesn't it?

machine hugger
09-11-2004, 06:39 AM
Pandisc also USA released Dave Tipper "SOUND OFF"!!! Excellent choice of the time. I still put together the idea that him and Si Begg fronted the dubstep along with the garage-heads...especially if you check a track like the Tipper's Q-Project Champion Sound remix. Zinc must have heard that track at some point before forming his Jammin' personae. Tenuous and correct as far as I'm concerned.


Miami and not one mention of the Bass Mekanik. :rolleyes:

Andrea Parker has a special touch for the low-end electro style doesn't she?? Love Touchin' Bass from what I have.

machine hugger
09-11-2004, 07:45 AM
Tipper-Tug of War.

Woebot
09-11-2004, 08:29 AM
Dave Tompkins, who've i always found a bit of a headache as a writer, did an excellent Miami Bass Primer for The Wire. One of their weirder Primers. He did an accomppanying show on WMFU which is excellent. You need RealPlayer, but it's truly an excellent set...

http://wfmu.org/playlists/shows/4205

Cant figure out if it's still available to stream

baboon2004
09-11-2004, 10:11 AM
Ed DMX drops some great little gems on the Breakin' label, and Rephlex released a Dynamix II comp a few years back. Everything connects up, doesn't it?

Yes, I loved 'Bodyrock' by DMX Krew (sort of an electro 'Don't You Want Me' with its parallel male/female narratives, I thought. At a stretch), and the Rephlex compilation is the 'Electro Megamix' thing I was talking about in my first post.

Also check: http://www.electroempire.com/miami.htm, and the host site, which is somehow affiliated to Bunker Records in the Netherlands, drawing further connecting lines among the worldwide electro diaspora. Cocadisco, Miami bass, Rephlex revivalism, Italo-disco...it all seems to be coming together.

Also, I must reiterate - Maggotron is the bomb. Guitar solos in Miami bass ('The Retun of the Bass That Ate Miami'; great title) -wtf? But it works.

mms
09-11-2004, 10:18 AM
bunker and especially an artist called luke eargoggle have a special place in their heart for the egyptian lover, eargoggle played at a night called cocodisco in the london wearing a lover t shirt and recently the egyptian lover has been playing out a bit.

dunno if u know this shop too , covers all of what baboon2004 is talking of
http://flexx.be/

Woebot
09-11-2004, 10:21 AM
Maggotron is the bomb. Guitar solos in Miami bass ('The Retun of the Bass That Ate Miami'; great title) -wtf? But it works.

Maggotron. I have a twelve of theirs. Nervous stream of sound-bytes over HUGE electro drums. The record almost a mix, rather than a distinct track. Maggotron are the quintessential post-Funkadelic act doncha think?

baboon2004
09-11-2004, 10:43 AM
Yeh, the soundbites he uses are pretty awesome too. Funkadelic? Exactly what I thought of upon hearing the guitar solo. And of course there is the strong suspicion that the name is a GC homage.

mms, I had loads of that Bunker stuff (plus Viewlexx etc) already, but through following up Hacker remixes and I-F associated leads more than anything else. Now a circle of sorts is complete.

bassnation
09-11-2004, 01:20 PM
Some of this stuff reminds me of 'ardkore reflected through a Floridian prism... it has the same 'throw everything together' vitality, absolute disregard for tastefulness, and the pursuit of the ultimate rush-trigger is mirrored in the pursuit of the deepest bass. Anyone else on here bitten by the Miami bass bug?

yes, love the miami bass sound. theres some wicked bass heavy stuff out there that comes across as the perfect mix of electro and hip hop. as regards the rush, in my mind this stuff makes very good e music.

what a lot of people miss is how much booty house (or ghettotech as it is now known) is influenced by both the miami sound and the 'ardkore thing. i've got some fantastic dj godfather mixes where he plays sped up hip hop, miami bass and rnb acappellas over drum and bass, all at the 160bpm mark with scratching that would put dj hype to shame! if anyone wants them let me know and i'll post em up on my site for a few days.

i'd also check uncle luke, 2 live crew, techno bass crew, bass mekanik etc. uncle luke features some appallingly misogynicstic lyrics ("i want some head" being a prime offender) but its still rocking.

in fact, i tried to do my own uk version of the mixed up cross-genre ghetto thing which has some uncle luke and dj assault on it. it can be found here:
http://www.hyperdub.com/speedometer/breakz/elektro.asx

marc

bassnation
09-11-2004, 01:40 PM
I've got an AWOL set from 1993 that's pretty hectic and thrown together at times. GQ keeps saying "you'll never hear music like this again." At one point he shouts out to "the Miami crew" and says "when you go home you can tell your friends about this." I've always wondered if they did and if anything came of it.

Anyway, I've been getting interested in the Bass too, through various round about channels. I have no idea where to start though. Any suggestions would be welcomed.

ah, i've got that one. its in four parts, kenny ken and dj randall - absolutely mind blowing, dark as fuck.

theres one tune on there i've been searching for - in fact it may even be the song where GQ says "you'll never hear music like this again.". don't know the name, label, artist or anything. i'll probably find it in ten years time just by accident, which is usually the way these things work!

nomos
09-11-2004, 01:47 PM
if anyone wants them let me know and i'll post em up on my site for a few days.
oh god yes. please. that sounds amazing.

BTW, I've been loving your Old Skool Rewind sets + Nervous Ragga. http://www.rhizomatic.org/blog/imgs/lighta.gif

baboon2004
09-11-2004, 01:56 PM
Thanks for all that info, Marc - will def check out your mix when i get the chance. The 'ardkore link is strengthened by the apparent fact that most MB tunes from 85-88 were based around cartoon/TV samples.
In fact quite a few bass tracks seem to be built not only around spoken-word samples, but also melodic samples (for example in 'Drop the Bass', it sounds very much as if they've filched a passage from an old electro record, a la Planet Rock).

Would love to get a hold of those Godfather mixes, if you could put them up (and the AWOL set, if you've got it!) on the site. Any mix with a catholic attitude towards genre very much appeals to me, which perhaps suggests an idea for a future thread, cos I'm having difficulty of thinking of too many off the bat.

BTw, thanks for turning me onto that Tanya Stephens album via that dancehall mix you posted up a while back - the first two tracks bring me out in goosepimples for being just the right kind of retro.

Hadean
09-11-2004, 02:13 PM
I brake for Old School Players: some of their covers rival the originals!

mms
09-11-2004, 02:16 PM
[QUOTE=bassnation]what a lot of people miss is how much booty house (or ghettotech as it is now known) is influenced by both the miami sound and the 'ardkore thing. i've got some fantastic dj godfather mixes where he plays sped up hip hop, miami bass and rnb acappellas over drum and bass, all at the 160bpm mark with scratching that would put dj hype to shame! if anyone wants them let me know and i'll post em up on my site for a few days.

i'd also check uncle luke, 2 live crew, techno bass crew, bass mekanik etc. uncle luke features some appallingly misogynicstic lyrics ("i want some head" being a prime offender) but its still rocking./[QUOTE]

yes please on the mix tip.
I've got a mate in detroit who makes ghetto tech stuff in detroit under the name starsky and clutch and also djs on radio shows there.
he reckons its black nightime music, the radio stations switch to it in the evenings, often playing direct from strip joints etc.
I like it, its all mentally fast grafted together stuff
as for the sexism, i think that stuff goes both ways, like in the the slackness of dancehall, women dissing men, men being dirty etc, its just filthy music.. the odd thing is if you go to booty nights, (i've seen godfather and also assault play, you do get alot more girls than say at d and b or other hardish fast music nights, it's sexy base/bass music.
I

bassnation
09-11-2004, 02:22 PM
BTw, thanks for turning me onto that Tanya Stephens album via that dancehall mix you posted up a while back - the first two tracks bring me out in goosepimples for being just the right kind of retro.

thats alright, always glad to turn people on to new (or old) music! the tanya stephens thing comes from Dj Red* though, i believe hes joined dissenus recently! :)

Diggedy Derek
09-11-2004, 04:10 PM
The Dave Tompkins set from WFMU that Woebot recommended above is truly excellent. It appears it was him who did the Miami Bass article for Grand Royale many years ago, a fantastic piece of gonzoid music journalism (shake yer booty contests, drinking and driving in a van with "bass" written on the side etc.)

dubplatestyle
10-11-2004, 01:31 AM
i've got that dynamix ii <i>electro megamix</i> cd, and it's a mindfuck. i have no idea how much is old and how much was new at the time (1998), but parts of it are so ukg circa late 2000/early 2001 that it's just not true.

puretokyo
10-11-2004, 02:00 AM
mms: starsky is some good stuff, i've got a couple of twelves, on databass if i remember correctly? definitely at the forefront of the ghettotech etc genre.

as for the sexism, yeah... when assault says 'b!tch don't cry/when i nut in your eye/let it drip down your face/give that b!tch a taste'... well... there's just not much you can say to that.

but yeah, when i saw godfather play here in melbourne, audience was 70% female and they went nuts when 'ass n titties' came on. the mind boggles, eh?

baboon2004
10-11-2004, 09:23 AM
but yeah, when i saw godfather play here in melbourne, audience was 70% female and they went nuts when 'ass n titties' came on. the mind boggles, eh?

Same thing that allows many women to love 'The Chronic' or 'Doggystyle' while leaving a lot of 'conscious' hip-hop aside - as with most people who like music (I think), if the groove is killer, then the lyrics can be treated/disregarded as secondary. I mean, I don't respect Dre and his ilk on any intellectual level, but goddamn he got a way with a tune.

As for the Dynamix ii, as far as I can gather it covers their career from 1985, but not in chronogical order. eg Give the Dj a Break is from 1987, but has prob been spruced up for the mix. As for UKG comparisons, I'll have to listen again. No doubt tho, Rephlex has been reissuing some amazing stuff while my back has been turned - this, Black Devil Disco Club...any more gems?

bassnation
10-11-2004, 09:57 AM
Same thing that allows many women to love 'The Chronic' or 'Doggystyle' while leaving a lot of 'conscious' hip-hop aside - as with most people who like music (I think), if the groove is killer, then the lyrics can be treated/disregarded as secondary. I mean, I don't respect Dre and his ilk on any intellectual level, but goddamn he got a way with a tune.

in terms of booty its also very cartoon-like - this alternative porno world which doesn't connect with reality. plus the whole thing with all the gangsta rap is artificial. i don't know if anyone read that book about death row records but the one thing that became clear is that all the rappers had a very tenous connection to stree life. when they actually came into contact with real gangstas they couldn't deal with it - dre trying to record a new album when theres pistol whippings going on in the studio etc.

i guess you could draw parallels with the current furore over homophobia in reggae - do people think its right to censor music because the world it portrays is unpalatable to suburban ears?

mms
10-11-2004, 10:19 AM
Same thing that allows many women to love 'The Chronic' or 'Doggystyle' while leaving a lot of 'conscious' hip-hop aside - as with most people who like music (I think), if the groove is killer, then the lyrics can be treated/disregarded as secondary. I mean, I don't respect Dre and his ilk on any intellectual level, but goddamn he got a way with a tune.

nah i've had this discussion and they think the lyrics are funny, as well as this the beats bang, it's arguable that someone like peaches pretty much comes out of this music, and that tune going around at the moment, "lick my _my_and my_and my_" :) sung by a woman.

puretokyo
10-11-2004, 10:32 AM
In my view the clearest indicator of the gender (non)issue regarding ghettotech etc is that Touchin' Bass is run by Andrea Parker. And the first release...? "Freaky bitches... is whut I need..."

baboon2004
10-11-2004, 10:37 AM
Re the 'cartoon world' that Marc mentions - I agree to a large extent with that (plus the Death Row book sounds gripping - for some reason I'm still obssessed with the goings-on at that label), certainly as regards gangsta rap. But I also think that it's something to do with becoming desensitised to it all, given that derogatory comments against women have become almost de rigueur in mainstream hip-hop since G-funk took over the world (or even before).

Interestingly (as these are more obscure trax, I have no idea what the female populace thinks about them), I find far more visceral and potentially 'offensive' earlier hip-hop songs such as Slick Rick 'Treat Her Like a Prostitute' and Ice-T's '6 in the Morning'. Or even Ultramagnetics' 'Give the Drummer Some', with its infamous couplet 'Switch up, change my pitch up/Smack my bitch up, like a pimp'. Maybe it's because the music in these tracks is more cut-up and more aggressive itself, or maybe it's because these seem less like fetishised cartoon threats for commercial gain, and more like random misogyny dropped in for the sake of it.

It's doing my head in trying to figure this one out, actually.

I'd certainly distinguish between sexual coarseness (whether by Khia or by Dj Assault) and threats of violence, tho'.

baboon2004
10-11-2004, 10:44 AM
In my view the clearest indicator of the gender (non)issue regarding ghettotech etc is that Touchin' Bass is run by Andrea Parker. And the first release...? "Freaky bitches... is whut I need..."

I see this as a bit of a non-argument, not knowing Andrea Parker. For all I know, she could be okay with,er, really dodgy stuff. ;)

I'm very far from diagreeing with the general tone of tolerance on here for cartoon misogyny, but I think trying to JUSTIFY it is a bit lame.

mms
10-11-2004, 10:54 AM
I see this as a bit of a non-argument, not knowing Andrea Parker. For all I know, she could be okay with,er, really dodgy stuff. ;)

I'm very far from diagreeing with the general tone of tolerance on here for cartoon misogyny, but I think trying to JUSTIFY it is a bit lame.


andrea parker is down with really dodgy stuff, that's no way to justify why you can't reason with women enjoying it..


one night at the booty bar by disco d has girls pimping boys in it,
also that sperm donor track ..
"he ain't my baby father he's just a sperm donor" nasty stuff.

i think it's pro sex rather than purely mysoginisyt. dirty and sweaty in the proper sense.

baboon2004
10-11-2004, 11:07 AM
Re Andrea Parker, the 'dodgy stuff' comment was just me trying to be wry.... The underlying point was only that one woman's opinion doesn't close the issue.

My viewpoint is simply that it's utterly pointless trying to 'justify' misogyny in hip hop, rock or anywhere else. And of course there's a difference between 'dirty' (always good), 'sexually degrading' (often tolerated) and plain threats of violence against women (sexual or otherwise). You can't justify such threats: don't be silly. If a girl got pissed off by me playing 'Treat Her Like a prostitute', then I couldn't complain, could I? But I still love the song.

robin
10-11-2004, 11:08 AM
what does pretty tony mean?
ive heard nas say he's "on some pretty tone shit",i see theres a miami bass pretty tony and then there's the new ghostface
is it slang for something?

mms
10-11-2004, 11:16 AM
Re Andrea Parker, the 'dodgy stuff' comment was just me trying to be wry.... The underlying point was only that one woman's opinion doesn't close the issue.

My viewpoint is simply that it's utterly pointless trying to 'justify' misogyny in hip hop, rock or anywhere else. And of course there's a difference between 'dirty' (always good), 'sexually degrading' (often tolerated) and plain threats of violence against women (sexual or otherwise). You can't justify such threats: don't be silly. If a girl got pissed off by me playing 'Treat Her Like a prostitute', then I couldn't complain, could I? But I still love the song.

I'm just defending ghettotech and not the getto boys or whatever , i don't think the language of ghettotech is ever threatening or violent towards women, it's just pornospeak, sexually aggressive physical language, from boys and girls,
also the thread as it is started from me saying how many women turn up to ghettotech nights over other fast electronic music nights.
anyway, i've asked a couple of women directly for their opinions on the subject, will get back to you.

luka
10-11-2004, 11:18 AM
one of the things i beleive that other people disagree with is that tim westwood has a very good ear. this is a case in point. theres no one here who knew about bass before the grand royal article but i remember westwood playing lots of bass in about 93,94 he was probably playing it before then, its just i wasn't listening cos jungle was still good but then it went shit so i started listening to more hiphop and heard the bass. so there it is, 10 more points to westwood.

mms
10-11-2004, 11:21 AM
one of the things i beleive that other people disagree with is that tim westwood has a very good ear. this is a case in point. theres no one here who knew about bass before the grand royal article but i remember westwood playing lots of bass in about 93,94 he was probably playing it before then, its just i wasn't listening cos jungle was still good but then it went shit so i started listening to more hiphop and heard the bass. so there it is, 10 more points to westwood.

hardly.

i think lots of people knew about miami bass and all the other stuff way before.
i never saw that grand royal thing, never read a copy of it.

bassnation
10-11-2004, 11:25 AM
hardly.

i think lots of people knew about miami bass and all the other stuff way before.
i never saw that grand royal thing, never read a copy of it.

2 live crew were enormously popular, pretty much mainstream - and that wasn't down to westwood (solely anyway). i think the whole genre was bigger than people might think.

luka
10-11-2004, 11:27 AM
nah bollocks, i know you lot! grand royal invented a lot of people.. they didn't know lee perry, didn#t know bass, never heard of a mullet. you didn't necessatrily have to read it to be influenced by it just like people never had to read heronbone but still found out about nasty crew cos of it or whatever.

luka
10-11-2004, 11:29 AM
2live crew doesnt really count as an exposure to bass though. every schoolkid knew them cos they had dirty lyrics but no one would have identified them as bass, it was just hiphop with extra rude words.

mms
10-11-2004, 11:33 AM
sorry mate, i never lived in london back then, never read grand royal, never listened to westwood, saw bass music as part of techno as much as hip hop, just a part of things i was into, a bit of digging, we've never met so you really don't know me.
knew about lee perry cos he came down to cornwall in the early 80's as part of the reggae sunsplash festival and my mates dad used to run the place where it was.

bassnation
10-11-2004, 11:34 AM
2live crew doesnt really count as an exposure to bass though. every schoolkid knew them cos they had dirty lyrics but no one would have identified them as bass, it was just hiphop with extra rude words.

it was still that scenes most commercial artist. its like excluding the prodigy from being a rave act just because people might see them as chart dance cos they had a few hits. everyone was into miami bass back in the early nineties from what i remember - the US even more so.

Woebot
10-11-2004, 11:35 AM
nah bollocks, i know you lot! grand royal invented a lot of people.. they didn't know lee perry, didn#t know bass, never heard of a mullet. you didn't necessatrily have to read it to be influenced by it just like people never had to read heronbone but still found out about nasty crew cos of it or whatever.

i didnt hear about miami bass until MUCH later than any Grand Royal piece (they folded ages ago right?)

ha ha ha :D

baboon2004
10-11-2004, 11:38 AM
I'm just defending ghettotech and not the getto boys or whatever , i don't think the language of ghettotech is ever threatening or violent towards women, it's just pornospeak, sexually aggressive physical language, from boys and girls,
also the thread as it is started from me saying how many women turn up to ghettotech nights over other fast electronic music nights.
anyway, i've asked a couple of women directly for their opinions on the subject, will get back to you.

Fair enough about ghettotech - pornospeak is very much okay by me. I suppose I conflated that with a wider point (difficult thing about dealing with several replies from different angles) about misogyny, which let's face it, is rampant in hip-hop and will probably always be, for whatever reasons. Ain't nuttin nobody can do to change it. Or something.


What is Grand Royal anyway? And you could read about 2 Live Crew in Time magazine in about 1989 or whenever, cos of the scandals. Would be pretty eaasy to follow up on their influences from there. Tho' I agree with the love for Westwood - who else could be that ridiculous and simultaneously play consistently great music?

Diggedy Derek
10-11-2004, 12:15 PM
Grand Royal was the Beastie Boys' magazine. A pretty great fanzine type thing. The Miami Bass article was massive- around 30 pages, a similar length to what they dedicated to Lee Perry. A mighty article- loads of interviews, loads of reportage, loads of crazy shenanigans.

mms
10-11-2004, 12:19 PM
Fair enough about ghettotech - pornospeak is very much okay by me. I suppose I conflated that with a wider point (difficult thing about dealing with several replies from different angles) about misogyny, which let's face it, is rampant in hip-hop and will probably always be, for whatever reasons. Ain't nuttin nobody can do to change it. Or something.


anyway quote from a female correspondent:

"was at WIDE thing with a load of mates (mostly female) the otehr week and everyone was saying "they're not playing enough booty!" - we can't get enough of it. The lyrics are just funny - i can't listen to smilex's big booty BBQ mix without laughing. Aside from the vocals the tunes are phat as, loads of bass and really fast.

"lets hear it for the small booty hoes!""

baboon2004
10-11-2004, 03:12 PM
Must check out more booty music, starting with that Dj Godafther mix that's up on bassnation now!

To bring the topic back to Miami bass (!), just played that L'Trimm track 'The Cars That Go Boom' with the bass turned way up, and it is f$cking ruff as. LOVE the contrast between the teenpop vox and the low end -that kind of incorporation of b-boy/junglist tricks into superpop brings to mind 'Genie in a Bottle' and, of course, 'One in a Million'.

mms
10-11-2004, 03:17 PM
yeah that l'trimm track is tops, btw there is an early ghetto boys track called "car freaks" that's a kind of answer to cars that go boom.

There is an artist called l'juan love that skywalker produced as well that's a little kid doing mcing, thats cool as fuk.

baboon2004
10-11-2004, 03:29 PM
This shit just gets better. On a related note I heard Kriss Kross in a club recently, inbetween some recent hip hop, and it just sounded, well, quite cool.

So, to open up another hornets' nest of terminology, what (good) electro scenes are missing from my hastily compiled and absurdly over-ambitious list?:

Miami bass (naturally)
Booty bass/straight-up Detroit shit
Drexciya/Adult/ more sinister stuff (including UR)
Hip-hop electro funk early 80s records (Bambaataa et al)
Netherlands cocadisco/Miss Kittin/ other 'euro' vocoder things
Classic Italo-disco/Black Devil Disco Club etc
Favela booty
Turn of the millennium electroclash

bassnation
10-11-2004, 03:47 PM
This shit just gets better. On a related note I heard Kriss Kross in a club recently, inbetween some recent hip hop, and it just sounded, well, quite cool.

So, to open up another hornets' nest of terminology, what (good) electro scenes are missing from my hastily compiled and absurdly over-ambitious list?:

Miami bass (naturally)
Booty bass/straight-up Detroit shit
Drexciya/Adult/ more sinister stuff (including UR)
Hip-hop electro funk early 80s records (Bambaataa et al)
Netherlands cocadisco/Miss Kittin/ other 'euro' vocoder things
Classic Italo-disco/Black Devil Disco Club etc
Favela booty
Turn of the millennium electroclash

i'd say you are missing modern euro electro - carl finlow, wevvers, radioactiveman, manyst etc...

actually i'm going to be interviewing manyst for a website i'm doing some writing for - hes a belgian producer who relocated to detroit recently, hes doing shows with people like ectomorph etc.

captain easychord
10-11-2004, 06:43 PM
just chiming in on the sexism thing...

by all anecdotal evidence the ghettotech scene is empowering for women if anything. at parties the women are the center of attention: the booty-shaking contests, the fixation on the woman's anatomy etc. it's not like they're being molested or anything, quite the contrary. if a guy tries to physically harm/harass a girl while she's shaking it there are repercussions, there's a definite line between reality and the world of the song... how can that be more marginalizing to women than a d n' b/techno party, where the guys are more interested in drooling over the decks than the opposite sex (and that's if any girls show up...) ;)

DigitalDjigit
10-11-2004, 06:57 PM
Miami Bass had some influence on the whole techno/hardcore thing in Europe. Beat Club - Security was played a lot and sampled lots (LTJ Bukem & Tayla - Bang the Drum for one). Dynamix II - 1,000,000 Mhz has such a jungalistic bass, my fave tune by them.

That AWOL miami thing, I doubt they were electro producers. Miami is one of the centers of the rave scene in the US, and they have that winter music conference thing which draws the top d'n'b producers. Bassnation, you got a better description of the tune you are looking for off that mix? Perchance we can help? I have the mix, you can just tell me where in the mix it is.