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blissblogger
01-09-2005, 06:13 PM
it's like two JG Ballard novels compacted into one

--'the drowned world'
meets

'High Rise'
(i'm thinking here of the situation inside the Superdome where 20 thousand refugees are corralled---NYT today: "Fights and trash fires broke out at the hot and stinking Superdome and anger and unrest mounted across New Orleans on Thursday" )

unbelievable that the richest, most powerful nation in the world can get caught off guard like this

i tend to see everthing through the prism of music to a shameful degree but i must admit one of the first things i thought was "i hope mannie fresh, juvie and the rest of cash money crew are OK"

dHarry
01-09-2005, 06:34 PM
it's like two JG Ballard novels compacted into one

--'the drowned world'
meets

'High Rise'

[...]

i tend to see everthing through the prism of music to a shameful degree but i must admit one of the first things i thought was "i hope mannie fresh, juvie and the rest of cash money crew are OK"

These 2 points are elucidated by this previous thread (http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=2097) - the Ballardian nightmare of the crazed armed looters described by a witness and the fact that the thread is named "when the levee breaks" (led zep).


unbelievable that the richest, most powerful nation in the world can get caught off guard like this

Not to reduce sympathy for the appalling situation that these people find themselves in (presumably only those too poor to evacuate?), or turn this calamity into a political football, but if the USA was caught like this because most of the local army are in Iraq, this just adds to the shame of the Bush legacy. I have also heard that Bush has already rejected offers of help from Russia and possibly others, in what might be an obscene display of vanity and pride.

It really does seem that very little was done officially beforehand to mitigate the potential disaster, and according to the thread above, the public are not being told the true scale of the crisis either (no surprise there, given the current climate of doublespeak and blatant falsifications of the Bush admin. & news media's collusion and/or state control).

blissblogger
01-09-2005, 06:59 PM
ah! didn't see the other thread

as it happens, my next sees-everything-through-the-prism-of-music was going to be bringing up the Led Zep's tune

albeit with a political aside: nothing changes, when the levee breaks, it's the po' black folks (and a few po white folks) that get their lives ruined

DigitalDjigit
01-09-2005, 08:28 PM
I heard that "When the Levee Breaks" is an old blues standard.

Also, I am doubting the veracity of that looting post. It just seems like a perfect time for those "see what those savages are really like?" stories. I have seen little independent confirmation on this kind of "zombies in the streets" nightmare elsewhere. There was however a hoax about looters besieging a hospital which makes me doubt that story you posted.

Ya'll seen the Bush playing the guitar photo taken the day the hurricane was unfolding, right? And why does every single report that mentions Bush never fails to mention how he cut short his vacation. What a tragedy.

DigitalDjigit
01-09-2005, 08:45 PM
Ok, I suppose I should revise my scepticism.

http://www.nola.com/newsflash/weather/index.ssf?/base/news-5/1125583440270470.xml&storylist=hurricane

dominic
01-09-2005, 08:47 PM
it looks really bad down south

very surreal

blissblogger
02-09-2005, 04:08 AM
I heard that "When the Levee Breaks" is an old blues standard.

.

yes it was originally sung by Memphis Minnie, a pioneering electric guitarist apparently, and it was written and recorded with her husband Kansas Joe McCoy in 1929

that's what i meant by nothing changes for the poor

those images of poverty stricken old folk cooped up in the stadium and convention center three days w/o food or water, no electricity, with nowhere to even take a shit - they are are incredibly shameful for America... it's real 2 Nations revelation stuff

good commentary on this in the New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/national/nationalspecial/02discrim.html?hp&ex=1125633600&en=bb18ef00f662359e&ei=5094&partner=homepage

not that anything's that much different in the UK, did you see this piece on the BBC website
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4201236.stm

magic, eh, after eight years of Labour govt...

dHarry
02-09-2005, 10:02 AM
...and apparently local authorities in New Orleans have been begging for funds to improve the levees in the eventuality of precisely this situation. But increasingly in recent years this became a political football which led to no-one with any technical knowledge being in a position to decide and act in the lead-in to the hurricane strike, with the ensuing organisational mess to add to the natural disaster.

I just heard that FEMA http://www.fema.gov/ in 2001 predicted/warned against three major US catastrophies - a terrorist attack on New York, a hurricane disaster in or around the Gulf of Mexico, and an earthquake in San Francisco. Two out of three so far - I wonder if there is any coherent plan for San Francisco in the country that seemed to help Thai tsunami victims more efficiently than its own down south.

k-punk
02-09-2005, 10:55 AM
yes it was originally sung by Memphis Minnie, a pioneering electric guitarist apparently, and it was written and recorded with her husband Kansas Joe McCoy in 1929

that's what i meant by nothing changes for the poor

those images of poverty stricken old folk cooped up in the stadium and convention center three days w/o food or water, no electricity, with nowhere to even take a shit - they are are incredibly shameful for America... it's real 2 Nations revelation stuff



Yeh, reminds me of that old blues standard (I think) covered by Nick Cave (http://www.unet.univie.ac.at/~a9503672/music/kickingagainst.html) on Kicking Against the Pricks, 'Muddy Water'....

The poor remain subject to Nature in a way that the rich simply aren't. Natural disasters always disproportionatly affect the poor... it was the same in the tsunami in Sri Lanka, which killed many of the poor forced to live on the beaches (and who any way were only living in that part of SL because of the tourist trade).

As for the UK --- well, there was more social mobility in the 50s and 60s than today. The Blair government has presided over the increased stratification of classes and the lowering of opportunities for working class people.

youshouldntdothat
02-09-2005, 03:39 PM
yes it was originally sung by Memphis Minnie, a pioneering electric guitarist apparently, and it was written and recorded with her husband Kansas Joe McCoy in 1929

that's what i meant by nothing changes for the poor

those images of poverty stricken old folk cooped up in the stadium and convention center three days w/o food or water, no electricity, with nowhere to even take a shit - they are are incredibly shameful for America... it's real 2 Nations revelation stuff

good commentary on this in the New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/national/nationalspecial/02discrim.html?hp&ex=1125633600&en=bb18ef00f662359e&ei=5094&partner=homepage

not that anything's that much different in the UK, did you see this piece on the BBC website
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4201236.stm

magic, eh, after eight years of Labour govt...


Apparently the song refers to the Mississippi flood of 1927, sounds like that one really taught african-americans how to 'weep and moan':

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/flood/timeline/timeline2.html

Shameful stuff indeed.

blissblogger
02-09-2005, 06:14 PM
Yeh, reminds me of that old blues standard (I think) covered by Nick Cave (http://www.unet.univie.ac.at/~a9503672/music/kickingagainst.html) on Kicking Against the Pricks, 'Muddy Water'.... .

i forget who did the original but there was a whole spate of blues songs about the Big Flood of 1927. it was that disaster that actually drove a lot of southern blacks up north to chicago, leading to the electric blues. so Muddy Waters was aptly named in a way.

9/11 and Nawlins -- two preventable calamities, on one guy's watch. in both cases, people who don't vote republican -- new yorkers and poor new lousisians -- suffer.

i'd almost take a wager that bush's approval ratings will drop into single figures

dominic
02-09-2005, 07:28 PM
i'd almost take a wager that bush's approval ratings will drop into single figures

the incompetence of the government is staggering

and if they handle things this poorly in new orleans, imagine what really goes on in iraq

he'll go down as one of the worst presidents in u.s. history -- lying, deceit, greed; gross mismanagement of the economy, fiscal madness; administrative incompetence; energy policy; over reliance on brute force (and failure to see the limits of brute force); callousness

bruno
02-09-2005, 08:09 PM
he'll go down as one of the worst presidents in u.s. history -- lying, deceit, greed; gross mismanagement of the economy, fiscal madness; administrative incompetence; energy policy; over reliance on brute force (and failure to see the limits of brute force); callousness

to the outside world. to americans he will be remembered as honest, down to earth, brave, etc etc.

blissblogger
02-09-2005, 08:28 PM
more people seeing new orleans through the prism of music

http://www.villagevoice.com/blogs/riffraff/archives/2005/09/katrina_destroy_1.php

Grievous Angel
02-09-2005, 08:41 PM
Fave inundation-themed blues song -- John Lee Hooker, Tupelo. Fair Cave cover of it IIRC.

Elan
02-09-2005, 10:01 PM
What's the lyric? Crying won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good...

Canada has formally offered help but was refused by Bush, but some Canucks are going down to help out anyway.

I cannot help but think that if this was a more Republican area then help would have arrived a damn sight faster. And that Katrina itself was underestimated and that is abysmal. Word on Bush being the worst. Thank God he can't run again.

blissblogger
02-09-2005, 10:14 PM
interesting this bit from associated press:

"After several days in the street with little water and less food, people around the convention center began imagining that the storm was somehow a vehicle for ethnic cleansing. One black man insists that authorities want everyone corralled into the convention center - not to facilitate an orderly evacuation, but so police can ignite the gas and blow them up. They want us all crazy so they can shoot us down like dogs!'' a woman shouts. "


cos the Superdome being a stadium did make me think of Pinochet's thugs rounding up all the left wingers in Chile and interning them in sports arenas...

wonder what paranoid conspiracy memes will be generated out of nawlins cf the Bush Planned 9/11 one

sufi
02-09-2005, 10:20 PM
cos the Superdome being a stadium did make me think of Pinochet's thugs rounding up all the left wingers in Chile and interning them in sports arenas...

... made me think of kigali 1994 :( :( :(

carlos
02-09-2005, 10:26 PM
here's a link to this series of articles from 2002

http://www.nola.com/washingaway/

the headline says "billions have been spent to protect us, but we grow more vulnerable every day"

pretty much everything the article warns about did actually happen

the way the city is built seems hopeless, really.

there's 11,000 nola refugees now in the astrodome (about 10 minutes from where i'm typing this) and the analogy with pinochet seems a bit rough...

DigitalDjigit
03-09-2005, 01:47 AM
I just saw the funniest thing. There is an appeal for aid going on right now on MSNBC. They had Mike Meyers and Kanye West. They said their thing and Kanye West goes, looking straight at the camera, "George Bush doesn't care about black people" and Mike Meyers just turns immediately and looks at him with a priceless expression on his face. They cut away right after that.

ripley
03-09-2005, 03:51 AM
DD that is funny! glad to smile for a minute. Smiling re: news from NOLa only happens when I see media figures finally waking up and speaking up..

don_quixote
03-09-2005, 09:30 AM
http://www.zebrality.com/media/2005/kanye.avi

turtles
03-09-2005, 09:56 AM
oh man, kanye is forever in my good books for that one. everyone's been tiptoeing around it, but i'm glad someone finally put it bluntly, on national tv.

i really, really hope they get some help to those people soon though.

k-punk
03-09-2005, 10:32 AM
Yeh I read that there were similar storms in Cuba last year, but the casualties were massively fewer --- because the govt evacuated everyone, rather than allow only those who had their own vehicles to make their own escape.

luka
03-09-2005, 04:22 PM
americans are animals./

monsterbobby
03-09-2005, 10:27 PM
read in the Indie today that part of the reason Katrina escalated to such huge power and devastation was because of global warming (it's all to do with the temperature of the water by the coast apparently). so, for the bush administration, who claim glabal warming is just an unproved theory with little real scientific support, i guess this is what Zizek would call an 'intrusion of the Real'...

dominic
03-09-2005, 11:14 PM
yeah, global warming plays a role

but it's also to do with cyclical change in the atlantic ocean -- and by "cyclical," i mean 50-year cycles -- such that mid-60s through mid-90s spawned comparatively tame hurricanes and fewer hurricanes

ripley
04-09-2005, 08:12 PM
americans are animals./

yeah that's just what Bush thinks about the people who are dying in Louisiana right now. nice one.

There's a lot of people living here, and most of us are getting fucked, but the poor (and especially poor and black) are getting the most fucked. Even in a failed state, there's nowhere else for them to turn, though, no other infrastructure that could provide relief so I would still include them in the concpt of "Americans."

That said, America is a third world country on steroids. I can't take much more reading about the news from NOla, but at every level there was massive, murderous incompetence and indifference, and even now, protection of private property and the maintenance of class and race inequality takes precedence over saving lives..

" At one point on Friday, (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050903/ap_on_re_us/katrina_superdome_hk1) the evacuation was interrupted briefly when school buses pulled up so some 700 guests and employees from the Hyatt Hotel could move to the head of the evacuation line — much to the amazement of those who had been crammed in the Superdome since last Sunday.

"How does this work? They (are) clean, they are dry, they get out ahead of us?" exclaimed Howard Blue, 22, who tried to get in their line. The National Guard blocked him as other guardsmen helped the well-dressed guests with their luggage."

From "Innovative Emergency Management" the private company who took over New Orleans' emergency planning last year (what a great idea, to privatize evacuation planning), to the federal govt ignoring and cutting funding for levee restructuring and emergency planning, to the whole "straghtening the mississippi" project and destruction of the wetlands. to the fact that the Superdom has been basically a death camp for the poor - this is the fruition of the right wing's vision in the count 1) make government ineffective, 2) skim off the rich, then lock up the poor and black and let them die. The feds have been preventing relief workers from getting into the city, and preventing people from leaving on their own power.

Soldiers are being called back from Iraq and told to do the same work (including being authorized to kill) in New Orleans. and the Army Times (http://www.armytimes.com/story.php?f=1-292925-1077495.php) have already started calling the people in New Orleans "Insurgents"

some informational links
(Videos (http://crooksandliars.com/2005/09/02.html#a4763) from reporters in tears outside the Superdome)

Two links on IEM, inc: here (http://leninology.blogspot.com/2005/08/politics-of-weather.html) and here (http://leninology.blogspot.com/2005/09/politics-of-weather-3-shyness-of.html)
and if you scroll down, some interesting info on how IEM got the job in first place (hint, Newt Gingrich is involved) here (http://leninology.blogspot.com/) .

a webjournal (http://www.livejournal.com/users/interdictor/) of a tech guy who is doing support services ---do a text search (you have to find the Sept 1 entry) on the word "Bigfoot" (the name of a nightclub owner who told the story of his experiences to the journalist) to find one of the more affecting stories there..

The Times Picayune (http://www.nola.com/weblogs/nola/) hosts a weblog where people can post their stories - most of them are not stories in the sense that they are accounts of people who are STILL fucking trapped, five days later.

Grievous Angel
04-09-2005, 08:28 PM
I couldn't believe it when Ripley said the army was a;lready calling US citizens insurgents so I illowed the link:

While some fight the insurgency in the city, other carry on with rescue and evacuation operations.

HMGovt
06-09-2005, 11:34 AM
Hurricane Katrina-Our Experiences

Two days after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, the Walgreen’s store at the corner of Royal and Iberville streets remained locked. The dairy display case was clearly visible through the widows. It was now 48 hours without electricity, running water, plumbing. The milk, yogurt, and cheeses were beginning to spoil in the 90-degree heat. The owners and managers had locked up the food, water, pampers, and prescriptions and fled the City. Outside Walgreen’s windows, residents and tourists grew increasingly thirsty and hungry.

The much-promised federal, state and local aid never materialized and the windows at Walgreen’s gave way to the looters. There was an alternative. The cops could have broken one small window and distributed the nuts, fruit juices, and bottle water in an organized and systematic manner. But they did not. Instead they spent hours playing cat and mouse, temporarily chasing away the looters.

We were finally airlifted out of New Orleans two days ago and arrived home yesterday (Saturday). We have yet to see any of the TV coverage of look at a newspaper. We are willing to guess that there were no video images or front-page pictures of European or affluent white tourists looting the Walgreen’s in the French Quarter.

We also suspect the media will have been inundated with “hero” images of the National Guard, the troops and the police struggling to help the “victims” of the Hurricane. What you will not see, but what we witnessed were the real heroes and sheroes of the hurricane relief effort: the working class of New Orleans. The maintenance workers who used a fork lift to carry the sick and disabled. The engineers, who rigged, nurtured and kept the generators running. The electricians who improvised thick extension cords stretching over blocks to share the little electricity we had in order to free cars stuck on rooftop parking lots. Nurses who took over for mechanical ventilators and spent many hours on end manually forcing air into the lungs of unconscious patients to keep them alive. Doormen who rescued folks stuck in elevators. Refinery workers who broke into boat yards, “stealing” boats to rescue their neighbors clinging to their roofs in flood waters. Mechanics who helped hot-wire any car that could be found to ferry people out of the City. And the food service workers who scoured the commercial kitchens improvising communal meals for hundreds of those stranded.

Most of these workers had lost their homes, and had not heard from members of their families, yet they stayed and provided the only infrastructure for the 20% of New Orleans that was not under water.

On Day 2, there were approximately 500 of us left in the hotels in the French Quarter. We were a mix of foreign tourists, conference attendees like ourselves, and locals who had checked into hotels for safety and shelter from Katrina. Some of us had cell phone contact with family and friends outside of New Orleans. We were repeatedly told that all sorts of resources including the National Guard and scores of buses were pouring in to the City. The buses and the other resources must have been invisible because none of us had seen them.

We decided we had to save ourselves. So we poured our money and came up with $25,000 to have ten buses come and take us out of the City. Those who did not have the requisite $45.00 for a ticket were subsidized by those who did have extra money. We waited for 48 hours for the buses, spending the last 12 hours standing outside, sharing the limited water, food, and clothes we had. We created a priority boarding area for the sick, elderly and new born babies. We waited late into the night for the “imminent” arrival of the buses. The buses never arrived. We later learned that the minute the arrived to the City limits, they were commandeered by the military.

By day 4 our hotels had run out of fuel and water. Sanitation was dangerously abysmal. As the desperation and despair increased, street crime as well as water levels began to rise. The hotels turned us out and locked their doors, telling us that the “officials” told us to report to the convention center to wait for more buses. As we entered the center of the City, we finally encountered the National Guard.

The Guards told us we would not be allowed into the Superdome as the City’s primary shelter had been descended into a humanitarian and health hellhole. The guards further told us that the City’s only other shelter, the Convention Center, was also descending into chaos and squalor and that the police were not allowing anyone else in. Quite naturally, we asked, “If we can’t go to the only 2 shelters in the City, what was our alternative?” The guards told us that that was our problem, and no they did not have extra water to give to us. This would be the start of our numerous encounters with callous and hostile “law enforcement”.

We walked to the police command center at Harrah’s on Canal Street and were told the same thing, that we were on our own, and no they did not have water to give us. We now numbered several hundred. We held a mass meeting to decide a course of action. We agreed to camp outside the police command post. We would be plainly visible to the media and would constitute a highly visible embarrassment to the City officials. The police told us that we could not stay. Regardless, we began to settle in and set up camp. In short order, the police commander came across the street to address our group. He told us he had a solution: we should walk to the Pontchartrain Expressway and cross the greater New Orleans Bridge where the police had buses lined up to take us out of the City. The crowed cheered and began to move. We called everyone back and explained to the commander that there had been lots of misinformation and wrong information and was he sure that there were buses waiting for us. The commander turned to the crowd and stated emphatically, “I swear to you that the buses are there.”

We organized ourselves and the 200 of us set off for the bridge with great excitement and hope. As we marched pasted the convention center, many locals saw our determined and optimistic group and asked where we were headed. We told them about the great news. Families immediately grabbed their few belongings and quickly our numbers doubled and then doubled again. Babies in strollers now joined us, people using crutches, elderly clasping walkers and others people in wheelchairs. We marched the 2-3 miles to the freeway and up the steep incline to the Bridge. It now began to pour down rain, but it did not dampen our enthusiasm.

As we approached the bridge, armed Gretna sheriffs formed a line across the foot of the bridge. Before we were close enough to speak, they began firing their weapons over our heads. This sent the crowd fleeing in various directions. As the crowd scattered and dissipated, a few of us inched forward and managed to engage some of the sheriffs in conversation. We told them of our conversation with the police commander and of the commander’s assurances. The sheriffs informed us there were no buses waiting. The commander had lied to us to get us to move.

We questioned why we couldn’t cross the bridge anyway, especially as there was little traffic on the 6-lane highway. They responded that the West Bank was not going to become New Orleans and there would be no Superdomes in their City. These were code words for if you are poor and black, you are not crossing the Mississippi River and you were not getting out of New Orleans.

CONTINUED IN NEXT POST >>>

HMGovt
06-09-2005, 11:35 AM
CONTINUED

Our small group retreated back down Highway 90 to seek shelter from the rain under an overpass. We debated our options and in the end decided to build an encampment in the middle of the Ponchartrain Expressway on the center divide, between the O’Keefe and Tchoupitoulas exits. We reasoned we would be visible to everyone, we would have some security being on an elevated freeway and we could wait and watch for the arrival of the yet to be seen buses.

All day long, we saw other families, individuals and groups make the same trip up the incline in an attempt to cross the bridge, only to be turned away. Some chased away with gunfire, others simply told no, others to be verbally berated and humiliated. Thousands of New Orleaners were prevented and prohibited from self-evacuating the City on foot. Meanwhile, only two City shelters sank further into squalor and disrepair. The only way across the bridge was by vehicle. We saw workers stealing trucks, buses, moving vans, semi-trucks and any car that could be hotwired. All were packed with people trying to escape the misery New Orleans had become.

Our little encampment began to blossom. Someone stole a water delivery trick and brought it up to us. Let’s hear it for looting! A mile or so down the freeway, an army truck lost a couple of pallets of C-rations on a tight turn. We ferried the food back to our camp in shopping carts. Now secure with the two necessities, food and water, cooperation, community and creativity flowered. We organized a clean up, and hung garbage bags from the rebar poles. We made beds from wood pallets and cardboard. We designated a storm drain as the bathroom and the kids built an elaborate enclosure for privacy out of plastic, broken umbrellas, and other scraps. We even organized a food recycling system where individuals could swap out parts of C-rations (applesauce for babies and candies for kids!).

This was a process we saw repeatedly in the aftermath of Katrina. When individuals had to fight to find food or water, it meant looking out for yourself only. You had to do whatever it took to find water for your kids or food for your parents. When these basic needs were met, people began to look out for each other, working together and constructing a community.

If the relief organizations had saturated the City with food and water in the first 2 or 3 days, the desperation, the frustration and the ugliness would not have set in.

Flush with the necessities, we offered food and water to passing families and individuals. Many decided to stay and join us. Our encampment grew to 80 or 90 people.

From a woman with a battery powered radio we learned that the media was talking about us. Up in full view on the freeway, every relief and news organizations saw us on their way into the City. Officials were being asked what they were going to do about all those families living up on the freeway? The officials responded they were going to take care of us. Some of us got a sinking feeling. “Taking care of us” had an ominous tone to it.

Unfortunately, our sinking feeling (along with the sinking City) was correct. Just as dusk set in, a Gretna Sheriff showed up, jumped out of his patrol vehicle, aimed his gun at our faces, screaming, “Get off the fucking freeway”. A helicopter arrived and used the wind from its blades to blow away our flimsy structures. As we retreated, the sheriff loaded up his truck with our food and water.

Once again, at gunpoint, we were forced off the freeway. All the law enforcement agencies appeared threatened when we congregated or congealed into groups of 20 or more. In every congregation of “victims” they saw “mob” or “riot”. We felt safety in numbers. Our “we must stay together” was impossible because the agencies would force us into small atomized groups.

In the pandemonium of having our camp raided and destroyed, we scattered once again. Reduced to a small group of 8 people, in the dark, we sought refuge in an abandoned school bus, under the freeway on Cilo Street. We were hiding from possible criminal elements but equally and definitely, we were hiding from the police and sheriffs with their martial law, curfew and shoot-to-kill policies.

The next days, our group of 8 walked most of the day, made contact with New Orleans Fire Department and were eventually airlifted out by an urban search and rescue team. We were dropped off near the airport and managed to catch a ride with the National Guard. The two young guardsmen apologized for the limited response of the Louisiana guards. They explained that a large section of their unit was in Iraq and that meant they were shorthanded and were unable to complete all the tasks they were assigned.

We arrived at the airport on the day a massive airlift had begun. The airport had become another Superdome. We 8 were caught in a press of humanity as flights were delayed for several hours while George Bush landed briefly at the airport for a photo op. After being evacuated on a coast guard cargo plane, we arrived in San Antonio, Texas.

There the humiliation and dehumanization of the official relief effort continued. We were placed on buses and driven to a large field where we were forced to sit for hours and hours. Some of the buses did not have air-conditioners. In the dark, hundreds if us were forced to share two filthy overflowing porta-potties. Those who managed to make it out with any possessions (often a few belongings in tattered plastic bags) we were subjected to two different dog-sniffing searches.

Most of us had not eaten all day because our C-rations had been confiscated at the airport because the rations set off the metal detectors. Yet, no food had been provided to the men, women, children, elderly, disabled as they sat for hours waiting to be “medically screened” to make sure we were not carrying any communicable diseases.

This official treatment was in sharp contrast to the warm, heart-felt reception given to us by the ordinary Texans. We saw one airline worker give her shoes to someone who was barefoot. Strangers on the street offered us money and toiletries with words of welcome.

Throughout, the official relief effort was callous, inept, and racist. There was more suffering than need be. Lives were lost that did not need to be lost.

Rambler
06-09-2005, 01:25 PM
Jesus. :( :mad: :(

Do you have a link for that, HMG?

HMGovt
06-09-2005, 02:11 PM
Jesus. :( :mad: :(

Do you have a link for that, HMG?

Afraid not, cut and paste from another forum where it was received by email. If one turns up, I will post it.

DigitalDjigit
06-09-2005, 04:48 PM
The sheriffs are the worst. Not helping is one thing. Not letting people help themselves and taking their food is much worse. The bastards deserve to be shot.

Pearsall
06-09-2005, 04:58 PM
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=46160


Ged Scott, 36, of Liverpool, was on his annual vacation at New Orleans' Ramada Hotel with his wife Sandra, 37, and their 7-year-old son, Ronan.

"I could not describe how bad the authorities were, taking photographs of us as we are standing on the roof waving for help, for their own personal photo albums, little snapshot photographs," Scott told BBC News.

Scott said there was a group of girls standing on the lobby's roof, calling out to passing rescuers for help.

"[The authorities] said to them, 'Well, show us what you've got' – doing signs for them to lift their T-shirts up. The girls said no, and [the rescuers] said 'well fine,' and motored off down the road in their motorboat. That's the sort of help we had from the authorities," he said.

Rambler
06-09-2005, 05:12 PM
Afraid not, cut and paste from another forum where it was received by email. If one turns up, I will post it.

Not to worry.

Canada J Soup
06-09-2005, 07:14 PM
Hurricane Katrina-Our Experiences [...]
That is so fucked up. It reminded me of the kind of refugee experience you hear about occuring in places where full on civil war has broken out.

polystyle desu
07-09-2005, 09:34 PM
Yep, super fucked up .
I can just feel the hardtone of those troopers faceoff on the bridge ...
Sad, sad but true Amurikans behind mirrorshades , locked and loaded .

Meanwhile , Repug Rudolph Giuliani weighs in from a safe distance to claim it's too soon to be drawing conclusions about whether the agencies response was timely or who was responsible.

Neatly contradicted by another item on news browser 'Secret memo reveals FEMA delay'
wherein FEMA 'director' Michael Brown's late delayed response to Katrina is revealed ...

Ru -dolph - you brown nosing *hit , suck up enough and you can be annointed /rewarded candidate next round.
Brown , he's the no - disaster - experience fart given the job the last FEMA director - who was heavy Bush supporter .
A real 'action man' .
Both should be made to drink the water along with their boss
"Escape From New Orleans" continues as the mayor sez 'leave or be taken out ...'

ripley
08-09-2005, 03:18 AM
Afraid not, cut and paste from another forum where it was received by email. If one turns up, I will post it.

I think this is it.

http://www.emsnetwork.org/artman/publish/article_18337.shtml

or maybe that's another story.. damn..

nick
08-09-2005, 12:07 PM
http://www.counterpunch.org/bradshaw09062005.html

It's here as well, with this background on the reporters:

"LARRY BRADSHAW and LORRIE BETH SLONSKY are emergency medical services (EMS) workers from San Francisco and contributors to Socialist Worker. They were attending an EMS conference in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck. They spent most of the next week trapped by the flooding--and the martial law cordon around the city."

polystyle desu
09-09-2005, 10:14 PM
Just caught the news -
FEMA chief made to resign his New Orleans duties -

zhao
13-09-2005, 02:04 AM
amazing. it's the 21st century, we are in a "1st world" nation. it's all of it, ALL of it, bullshit. the only thing you can trust is yourself, your family, and your closest friends. and that's all you have when the proverbial soon to become real, shit hits the fan. all over, in a big way, before too long.

estimate global oil crisis is set for somewhere around 2015, right? also the water and food shortage problems will get worse by then too. and don't forget that environmental disaster report from last year, by 200+ Nobel Laureate scientists, that warned of "Day After Tomorrow" scenario around 2020 (which I read on Yahoo and mysteriously dissapeared afterward. Fortune magazine also ran the same article)

so I'm thinking about moving to South East Asia... where the climate is good and balanced, people know how to farm, the food good, music scene hot...

ripley
14-09-2005, 08:56 AM
amazing. it's the 21st century, we are in a "1st world" nation.

The US is a third world nation on steroids. This just finally hit the news, is all.

Ness Rowlah
15-09-2005, 10:51 AM
Just caught the news -
FEMA chief made to resign his New Orleans duties -

well he did after admitting lying on his CV. the real story here is not him lying on his CV -

but why wasn't his background details more thoroughly checked in the first place?
surely you would expect him to be carefully vetted before getting a job like this?
why wasn't someone who could show REAL experience in managing disasters or big operations not hired in the first place (ie from the Red Cross, UN or the Army)?
was he just placed in his job to be a useful scapegoat? Ie the authorities knew of his made-up background, but still hired him to have around as a scapegoat.

Pearsall
15-09-2005, 02:35 PM
amazing. it's the 21st century, we are in a "1st world" nation. it's all of it, ALL of it, bullshit. the only thing you can trust is yourself, your family, and your closest friends. and that's all you have when the proverbial soon to become real, shit hits the fan. all over, in a big way, before too long.

estimate global oil crisis is set for somewhere around 2015, right? also the water and food shortage problems will get worse by then too. and don't forget that environmental disaster report from last year, by 200+ Nobel Laureate scientists, that warned of "Day After Tomorrow" scenario around 2020 (which I read on Yahoo and mysteriously dissapeared afterward. Fortune magazine also ran the same article)

so I'm thinking about moving to South East Asia... where the climate is good and balanced, people know how to farm, the food good, music scene hot...

http://www.amconmag.com/2005/2005_09_12/cover.html

you might find that interesting

Ness Rowlah
15-09-2005, 04:01 PM
a good read that Pearsall (although a bit pessimistic?)



The permanent global energy crisis will create a large new class of economic losers in the U.S.—the former middle class. A lot of vocational niches are going to disappear and will not come back. Incomes will be lost forever. Members of the former middle class will be angry, resentful, and bewildered by the loss of their entitlements to the American Dream ... It is impossible to predict what kind of maniacs they may vote for ...

Pearsall
15-09-2005, 08:10 PM
Oh yeah, Kunstler is an apocalyptist of the first degree (he was one of those people who thought Y2K was going to be the end of everything), but he writes well.

dominic
16-09-2005, 03:31 AM
i really like the kunstler article! -- appeals to the hardcore pessimist in me

however, i like the chances of the u.s. army against the chinese army -- i.e., we'll simply bomb their tank columns and troop formations from a thousand miles up in the sky

ALSO -- i think people need to get real about competition for oil

and so who knows, maybe the bush administration isn't as deluded as they seem = maybe they realize that raw military power is the one card that the u.s. has in its favor, and maybe the rhetoric about terrorism and wmd's and dealing with the pathologies of an undemocratic middle east (i.e, making iraq a "beacon") was simply rhetoric for an american public too ignorant and craven to face the reality of having to control oil on the ground -- and maybe they don't really give a fuck about peace among the various peoples of iraq -- and maybe they realize that a democratic iraq would allign with iran in any case -- and so maybe the policy is to simply not give a fuck what happens to the people of iraq, i.e., let them kill each other b/c it's a cruel cruel world -- and in this cruel cruel world they're gonna park the u.s. military right smack in the center of the middle east

american military power = ability to destroy the military forces of any organized state

limits of american military power = inability to keep the peace on the ground

yeah, i beginning to think it's gonna be war b/w u.s. and china -- with u.s. destroying the conditions of whatever global prosperity might yet remain (not much?) in order to preserve its relative power

but what kunstler said about u.s. suburbia being the greatest misallocation of resources ever -- absolutely on the money!!!

people are going to be so utterly unprepared for the hard grim cruel 21st century

and we'll all be fucked together -- so might as well have fun now???

i.e., i still find myself counseling hedonism

ha ha

party til you can party no more

luka
16-09-2005, 12:04 PM
jesus, i hate americans, i can't get over it. and dominic, you're not helping...

dominic
16-09-2005, 01:36 PM
i'm not endorsing the way the world works

merely saying what i think is going to happen and, indeed, is happening

scottdisco
16-09-2005, 06:05 PM
hang about Luka my mrs is a septic!!

and i still love you...

HMGovt
02-11-2005, 12:07 PM
http://www.wrathofbush.com/