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View Full Version : Portishead 'Dummy' - has it aged well?



Tactics
07-09-2005, 08:04 PM
in light of that dude/him/shim/im not sure winning the Mercury last night I thought I'll bring up a old winner (I think).....

I was listening to it today nodding my head severly but then wondered at some tracks whether they had aged well cos I know some peeps be looking pon this LP as a classic....

I know im probably asking the wrong ppl but what do you guys think? (if you have heard the LP at all)

also my Jools Holland post got locked cos of someone who isnt me but it was going well man - can it be unlocked?

polystyle desu
07-09-2005, 08:09 PM
From here , I think it has aged well .
It /they certainly did have some influence that continues .

Would have liked to hear more Portis , am curious about that Beth Gibbon record that came after Portis

mms
07-09-2005, 08:17 PM
it was a funny one that - i wasn't terribly impressed at the time esp as other amazing things were coming out of brizzle at the time like tricky and roni size and his crew, the second album that followed it and nobody bought i enjoyed alot more, ravenous anger spelt out over soundtrack funk that had the downward feeling of sabbath riffs. pure sexy evil.
it totally buried the first album for me but was way to heavy for the dinner party chill out crowd.
Apparently they are working on more stuff.

polystyle desu
07-09-2005, 08:22 PM
Seconding that 2nd Album
And the Live had it's moments too

Tactics
07-09-2005, 08:22 PM
it was a funny one that - i wasn't terribly impressed at the time esp as other amazing things were coming out of brizzle at the time like tricky and roni size and his crew, the second album that followed it and nobody bought i enjoyed alot more, ravenous anger spelt out over soundtrack funk that had the downward feeling of sabbath riffs. pure sexy evil.
it totally buried the first album for me but was way to heavy for the dinner party chill out crowd.
Apparently they are working on more stuff.


the 2nd one is murkery....'cowboys', 'elysium' yeaaaaaaah man....I got a tape of them at glasto after it came out and man....pure power.....

they are supposed to be coming out with more stuff yeah...

I jus remembered their process of recording.....they create loops then master them, put them on a heavy weighted vinyl pressing then sample off that....v.expensive.....and slightly anal lol....

DigitalDjigit
07-09-2005, 08:52 PM
I only own the Live one but that one is really excellent. Timeless i would say. I think the live element is what is gonna carry it through. Simple drum loops are feeling dated already.

hamarplazt
07-09-2005, 09:32 PM
I think 'Dummy' and Portishead are responsible for some of the worst things in 90s music: the cult of all things cinematic and the fetishization of "cool"-soundtrack atmospherics. And they made a lot of rock critics able to pretend they were into electronic music and sample culture without ever investigating the really original stuff, helped to create the myth that the 90s was all about reassembling bits of the past and that no real innovation happened.

All that said, I think 'Dummy', heard out of this context, have aged quite well. It really works as a nice, integrated work, and there is some great moody moments (the second is much better at this, though), it just get a bit too much if you listen to it too often.

Buick6
08-09-2005, 01:00 AM
I reckon it's aged well. about as good as 'Loveless'.

tryptych
08-09-2005, 01:30 AM
it was a funny one that - i wasn't terribly impressed at the time esp as other amazing things were coming out of brizzle at the time like tricky and roni size and his crew, the second album that followed it and nobody bought i enjoyed alot more, ravenous anger spelt out over soundtrack funk that had the downward feeling of sabbath riffs. pure sexy evil.
it totally buried the first album for me but was way to heavy for the dinner party chill out crowd.
Apparently they are working on more stuff.


Hmm that's exactly how i felt.. Tricky seemed definately more important at the time. But later I came to appreciate it over Trickys output, and that second Portishead album is fantastic. bleak and cold...

I really like the Rustin' Man album that Beth Gibbons did with Paul Webb from Talk Talk. Definately one to check....

gumdrops
08-09-2005, 01:37 AM
at the time, i think when someone asked tricky tricky what he hated, he said something like 'people saying i sound like fucking portishead'

soundslike1981
08-09-2005, 01:58 AM
I got rid of this record years ago, but hearing bits lately I've thought about picking it up again from a used bin. I remembered it negatively, as mainly atmosphere and "cool," but it seems like maybe there was more thought put into it than I recognised then.

michael
08-09-2005, 02:00 AM
I find myself wanting to hear the odd song off the first album, but don't regret selling it on. It was so completely ubiquitous once it broke that I find it hard to enjoy the music now. I also suffer flashbacks to the use of 'Rhodes' or whatever it's called in the Tank Girl movie, which I hated.

I don't like the second album. It's too cold and bleak. :D Haha. Gotta love subjectivity.

michael
08-09-2005, 03:21 AM
Oh yeah, I do find myself coming back to the video of 'Only You', which I've got on that Chris Cunningham DVD. Sooo good.

hint
08-09-2005, 10:19 AM
It's like some kind of Dissensus thread megamix:

Here's a video (.wmv) (http://mmslb.eonstreams.com/b/ccri/cc_corporate/kanye/beat.wmv) of Kanye talking about how much of an influence Dummy was.

dHarry
08-09-2005, 12:46 PM
Dummy became a negative influence precisely because it was so good - just like Nirvana gave birth to horrendous bands like Pearl Jam, it was responsible for everything from Sneaker Pimps' pop-hop to Robbie Williams doing Bond-theme-esque stuff. But if you forget the coffee bar ubiquity and rash of 90's "female folk-soul singer does guest appearance on indietronica LP", you'll hear a truly epochal record.

Portishead are post-modern with a difference, in that they hearken back to pop and rock's romantic era (60's/70's) yet use sampling and po-mo techniques in their own striving for novelty and authenticity, recreating the nostalgic sounds of yesteryear but re-contextualising them in a unique hip hop sound-world. In this way they can be seen as an example of Deleuze and Guattari's concept of artistic becoming, where the styles of the past are recreated but become different, are set free from their original context to reveal different forces, at the same time as their own sound is transformed by this curious fidelity to the sounds of the past.

Geoff Barrow freely admits in (rare) interviews that he hasn't seen the films he's sampled, has never listened to the jazz or avant-classical he's supposed to be influenced by, is cripplingly media-shy and sincere (he actually apologised to one interviewer for owning the house he bought on the album sales), and obviously had no idea that his creation would become (briefly) massively trendy. He is as obsessive as Kevin Shields, recording his own sounds live with dogged fidelity to recording techniques of the 60's/70's, then digitally processing them, pressing them to vinyl and re-recording them from turntables weighted down for extra crackle, hum, weight, gravity and pressure, allying these slo-mo soporific atmospherics with an irrational love of hip hop and cinematic sound.

Beth Gibbon similarly rarely did press interviews, caring so little for acclaim that she drunkenly swapped her Mercury statue for a fag after the awards. But she is a virtuoso of vocal style, refusing an authentic "personal" voice in favour of inhabiting different styles, often within a single song. Glory Box for example begins with that famous Eartha Kitt vampire routine then switching abruptly into open-throated soul diva for the chorus. It's this stylistic overload that allows her and us to revel in either the over-blown emotions of tracks like this, or the grain and sound of the voice, without the pressure of believing in an emoting ego behind it. And then from nowhere they detonate their most commercial single with that depth-charge breakbeat-from-hell in place of a middle 8, with Gibbon's distorted wailing tape-echoed over it - one of the more thrilling moments of pop terrorism in recent memory, up there with 'ardcore's anschluss on the charts a few years previously.

The second studio album was the same only more so, the darkness darker, the distortion rougher, the voice more cracked and ravaged, culminating in Half-Day Closing which combines Black Sabbath/King Crimson-esque dynamics with Beth shrieking of the evils of capitalism (I think - "Underneath the fading sun/the silent scheme of a businessman/has left us choking/Dreams/can't believe they've gone") through a distorted Hammond organ Leslie speaker, as if underwater or from another planet.

Kanye West isn't the only hip hop artist to cite them as an influence - one of those Wu-Tang offshoots (Bobby Digital I think) sampled them, and Timbaland has cited their sound/production as an influence (he possibly sampled them somewhere also?). After a Shields-esque lull since there last album who knows what they will sound like next, or what the world will make of it, but in a music-scape devoid of singular acts following a vision I reckon we need them more than ever (Ladytron and maybe Stereo Total are the only other "bands" that I can get excited about; in the post-rave discontinuum it's more about scenes/genres).

petergunn
08-09-2005, 10:31 PM
Dummy became a negative influence precisely because it was so good - just like Nirvana gave birth to horrendous bands like Pearl Jam, it was responsible for everything from Sneaker Pimps' pop-hop to Robbie Williams doing Bond-theme-esque stuff. But if you forget the coffee bar ubiquity and rash of 90's "female folk-soul singer does guest appearance on indietronica LP", you'll hear a truly epochal record.


i was right about to post that... the only reason Portishead haven't aged well, is like Nirvana, they came up with a relatively easy style to mimic and water down, and so their style has been destroyed to the point that i think of "trip hop" as a bad thing... every retarded rock band heard that portishead record (and lists them as influences on their "bassist wanted!" flyers) and now puts a hip hop drumbeat on every ballad they write...







Kanye West isn't the only hip hop artist to cite them as an influence - one of those Wu-Tang offshoots (Bobby Digital I think) sampled them, and Timbaland has cited their sound/production as an influence (he possibly sampled them somewhere also?). the post-rave discontinuum it's more about scenes/genres).

yes, rza sampled Portishead on the Bobby Digital LP...

bassnation
08-09-2005, 10:49 PM
I think 'Dummy' and Portishead are responsible for some of the worst things in 90s music: the cult of all things cinematic and the fetishization of "cool"-soundtrack atmospherics. And they made a lot of rock critics able to pretend they were into electronic music and sample culture without ever investigating the really original stuff, helped to create the myth that the 90s was all about reassembling bits of the past and that no real innovation happened.

i don't think any of this is really true. some great music is cinematic and if you want to point the finger you should be looking at lps like the blade runner soundtrack by vangelis which everyone in the nineties dance scene was into. its fashionable for people to pretend they were never into some of the more popular nineties dance music like portishead - but not me. i loved it and i couldn't care less if its unfashionable now.

and just because some people played it at dinner parties doesn't mean dummy isn't a good album. not willing to assess things on that basis, its what it sounds like to me that counts. iirc theres some dark tunes on there. thinking of that one with the pitched down vocal chorus ("never fall in love again"?). heavy. in fact i remember the lp doing my head in sometimes coming down after raving.

mms
08-09-2005, 11:04 PM
this thread makes me want to start a thread about tricky which i've been thinking about for ages but there is too much to say about the guy.

hamarplazt
08-09-2005, 11:04 PM
i don't think any of this is really true. some great music is cinematic and if you want to point the finger you should be looking at lps like the blade runner soundtrack by vangelis which everyone in the nineties dance scene was into. its fashionable for people to pretend they were never into some of the more popular nineties dance music like portishead - but not me. i loved it and i couldn't care less if its unfashionable now.

Never actually loved it, but I did like it back then and I still do. As I wrote.

And yes, some cinematic music is great, but 90s cinematic-by-numbers music isn't.

bassnation
09-09-2005, 12:05 AM
Never actually loved it, but I did like it back then and I still do. As I wrote.

And yes, some cinematic music is great, but 90s cinematic-by-numbers music isn't.

well, i suppose if we're talking about soporific bossa nova drivel like theivery corporation i could agree with you. but they were hardly in the same league as portishead. funnily enough i remember despising a lot of trip hop in the nineties but i'm coming to look on it more kindly with the passage of time, not less. even gave the mo wax headz album a listen the other day.

Kuma
09-09-2005, 05:49 AM
Hells yes, if only because I can still put on today and it feels as fresh as ever or whip it out in a DJ set and watch heads nod. It may be to blame for a legion of psuedo-trip hop wankers but that speaks everything about its influence..

hamarplazt
09-09-2005, 10:04 AM
well, i suppose if we're talking about soporific bossa nova drivel like theivery corporation i could agree with you. but they were hardly in the same league as portishead.
Well, I never claimed Portishead was bad, just that they have been very influencial, direct or indirect, on a lot of things that I don't like.

I was allways a bit ambivalent towards trip hop. Probably most of all beacuse it got so much attention without being half as interesting as all the rave stuff I loved, which either got no attention at all, or was ridiculed by critics falling over themselves to tell everybody how new and exciting trip hop was.

Tricky was good. I only got 'Pre-millenium Tension' a couple of years ago, but I really like it. Never got into Massive Attack, too much soul for my taste. Earthlings 'Radar', on the other hand, is the great lost trip hop album.

henry s
09-09-2005, 04:03 PM
I second the Earthling sentiment...whatever happened to them/him?..."my gosh, my gosh, I'm Juliette Binoche"...we need more of that...

mms
09-09-2005, 04:12 PM
silly to hate them cos some trip hop was bad - like hating the internet cos some people use it to diseminate kid porn.
has anyone heard a new guy on stones thro called koushik actually - real trip hop that is with a big 60's influence - liked it i dod

jenks
09-09-2005, 04:29 PM
i think dummy probably suffered from being used in so many Channel 4 documentaries - tracks getting wheeled out to signify anything vaguely scary or otherworldly.

i started playing their music again about a year ago after one of their tracks came up on a random shuffle on the ipod. dummy, of course, is the blueprint for their sound but like other posters i think the apotheosis is the live album complete with orchestra and some of gibbons' finest vocals.

the solo work she did - ramblin man - ended up being far too tasteful for my ears - listenable but somehow not very filling. (also she looked like mark fowler's scottish girlfriend)

that earthling album still remains a firm favourite and whilst trip hop soon became tarnished as agenre as the bandwagon rolled out of bristol it is interesting to note that the stuff that is still worth listening to - blue lines, maxinquaye, einstein, dummy is all from the original gang - no-one is asking if morcheeba, sneaker pimps or any of those other chancers records still stand up to scrutiny.

Pearsall
09-09-2005, 04:43 PM
A big problem with a lot of trip-hop was just that it was noodly stoner music and it went on for far too long; I pulled out the old Ninja Tune compilation 'Flexistentialism' the other night and there are way way way too many tunes that only have enough interesting elements for about 3 or 4 minutes dragging on for like 7-8 minutes.

Stoners.

bassnation
09-09-2005, 06:44 PM
that earthling album still remains a firm favourite and whilst trip hop soon became tarnished as agenre as the bandwagon rolled out of bristol it is interesting to note that the stuff that is still worth listening to - blue lines, maxinquaye, einstein, dummy is all from the original gang - no-one is asking if morcheeba, sneaker pimps or any of those other chancers records still stand up to scrutiny.

sneaker pimps "spin spin sugar" is ok though - esp. the van helden remix - apparently produced after he'd visited a jungle night in london and wanted to incorporate elements of the sound in a house tune. it was rinsed pretty heavily by the original speed garage djs iirc.

but morcheeba - ugh. my wife still likes their stuff so its something i still suffer on a regular basis!

SIZZLE
09-09-2005, 09:16 PM
Portishead is very very big, but they definitely did suffer a bit of a bob marleyization, getting played so much in so many stupid contexts that you start to hate it, even tho it's amazing music.

mms
09-09-2005, 10:07 PM
Portishead is very very big, but they definitely did suffer a bit of a bob marleyization, getting played so much in so many stupid contexts that you start to hate it, even tho it's amazing music.

funny that you mention that - i've begun to really enjoy bob again.
but yeah contexts - i had a mate who's dad was a doctor and they were a funny restrained family and his mum and dad would play bob marley at dinner to try and be down with the kids . they managed to put me off the bob dylan and the beatles pretty much permanently thru their constant attempts at musical schooling.

atomly
09-09-2005, 11:16 PM
Portishead is very very big, but they definitely did suffer a bit of a bob marleyization, getting played so much in so many stupid contexts that you start to hate it, even tho it's amazing music.

Haha, it's hilarious that you say that. I hated Bob Marley for years because of that...

Anyway, the Portishead albums are great, even in retrospect-- I gotta say Live is always the one I found myself listening to the most, honestly-- but it's true that so much "trip hop" was utter crap. I do like Massive Attack and Tricky quite a bit at various points throughout their careers, but overall I'd say trip hop as a whole was the "safe" genre that people who didn't like electronic music (especially rock critics) could namecheck to feel like they did so that they didn't feel completely irrelevant.

Nick Gutterbreakz
10-09-2005, 07:58 AM
Geoff Barrow freely admits in (rare) interviews that he hasn't seen the films he's sampled, has never listened to the jazz or avant-classical he's supposed to be influenced by, is cripplingly media-shy and sincere (he actually apologised to one interviewer for owning the house he bought on the album sales), and obviously had no idea that his creation would become (briefly) massively trendy. He is as obsessive as Kevin Shields, recording his own sounds live with dogged fidelity to recording techniques of the 60's/70's, then digitally processing them, pressing them to vinyl and re-recording them from turntables weighted down for extra crackle, hum, weight, gravity and pressure, allying these slo-mo soporific atmospherics with an irrational love of hip hop and cinematic sound.


Yeah, Geoff's obsessive production was part of the appeal for me. That guy was intense. I was quite friendly with Adrian Utley for a while, but one time I found myself stood next to Geoff at a bar I was too freaked to speak to him. The guy radiates...something (in my mind perhaps). I'm with the 'second album is best' crew - 'Portishead' is dangerously heavy, and much more homogonised than the first, without any of that 'prettyness'. But they're both great records. I rarely play them now, but wouldn't ever sell them.

dominic
10-09-2005, 07:59 AM
sneaker pimps "spin spin sugar" is ok though - esp. the van helden remix - apparently produced after he'd visited a jungle night in london and wanted to incorporate elements of the sound in a house tune. it was rinsed pretty heavily by the original speed garage djs iirc.

i think the phluide "creeping vine" version on the flip is superior to the van helden remix

and for a uk garage take, i think the 187 lockdown version is better than van helden's version

can't quite figure out why van helden got so much acclaim for this, frankly

and of course the sneaker pimps original is the best one of all!!!

michael
10-09-2005, 08:44 AM
has anyone heard a new guy on stones thro called koushik actually - real trip hop that is with a big 60's influence - liked it i dod
Haha, I was listening to this at the gym today. I feel like such a yuppie listening to trendy obscure shit on my digital music player while working out. Oh wait, maybe because I am...

Anyway, yeah, it's a great collection of tracks he's put out on EPs. It's got all the hallmarks of 60s and 70s trippy shit.. reversed bits and pieces and strange harp sounds and cool bass (guitar) lines and his hazed out vocals.. Sorta the meeting point between shoegaze and trip-hop, yet despite how that might sound it's actually good. ;)

Also great that the tracks are short.

The album on Stones Throw is a collection of previously released EPs. I first heard of him via a remix he did for Four Tet, which was really good. From memory Four Tet also released Koushik's first EP, 'Battle Rhymes for Battle Times'. Haha... I love the fact he sings that line in a muffled blur that doesn't sound at all tough. :)

bassnation
10-09-2005, 08:55 AM
i think the phluide "creeping vine" version on the flip is superior to the van helden remix

and for a uk garage take, i think the 187 lockdown version is better than van helden's version

can't quite figure out why van helden got so much acclaim for this, frankly

and of course the sneaker pimps original is the best one of all!!!

yeah, i like the original too - but haven't heard the other remixes. the other avh remix that came out the same time was genaside ii narra mine - a song which is hard to improve imo but the mixes weren't too bad. curiously there was also a wu tang remix released too - which didn't quite work. i love the idea of rza listening to narra mine and all that stuff.

michael
10-09-2005, 09:02 AM
For the record, I have to confess to being quite a fan of what I guess all got lumped together as "trip-hop". Even at the time I thought of a lot of eg. Ninja Tune as acid jazz with a new name from the press, but some of that early Mo'Wax and whatever really blew me away.

Autechre's remix of Palmskin Productions.. like 'Incunabula' goes hip-hop

UNKLE well before the first album.. funny to see Tim Goldsworthy has resurfaced as "the other one" again, this time in the DFA.

DJ Shadow well before his first album..

The occasional Krush tune rose out of the mire, eg. 'Kemuri'...

Trevor Jackson's meagre output as Skull was pretty ace. A bit fucken ornery, but I presume those who are bemoaning trip-hop being too "cafe" would find that a plus. I used to always look out for his name on production credits etc. and was so confused when that Playgroup stuff started surfacing.

What about Skylab's first album? In my mind that holds a fond place with 'UFOrb', where the Orb did a whole synthy techno-influenced take on ambient music while Skylab came at it from the grubby lo-fi hip-hop angle. "I put a seashell to my ear and it all comes back..."

dominic
10-09-2005, 09:24 AM
the other avh remix that came out the same time was genaside ii narra mine - a song which is hard to improve imo but the mixes weren't too bad. curiously there was also a wu tang remix released too - which didn't quite work. i love the idea of rza listening to narra mine and all that stuff.

if i had to choose one song from the 91/92 era as THE best, it'd be narra mine

i have the wu tang remix, and rather like it, but haven't heard the avh remixes

and yeah, the wu tang remix is more or less trip hop -- circa 96

jenks
10-09-2005, 05:43 PM
What about Skylab's first album? In my mind that holds a fond place with 'UFOrb', where the Orb did a whole synthy techno-influenced take on ambient music while Skylab came at it from the grubby lo-fi hip-hop angle. "I put a seashell to my ear and it all comes back..."
two big favourites of mine.

still play the Skylab album all the time - somehow, though, never saw either of them as triphop . always saw the howie b stuff as some kind of morphed eno thing with a bit of toop thrown in for good measure

mms
10-09-2005, 07:23 PM
For the record, I have to confess to being quite a fan of what I guess all got lumped together as "trip-hop". Even at the time I thought of a lot of eg. Ninja Tune as acid jazz with a new name from the press, but some of that early Mo'Wax and whatever really blew me away.

Autechre's remix of Palmskin Productions.. like 'Incunabula' goes hip-hop

UNKLE well before the first album.. funny to see Tim Goldsworthy has resurfaced as "the other one" again, this time in the DFA.

DJ Shadow well before his first album..

The occasional Krush tune rose out of the mire, eg. 'Kemuri'...

Trevor Jackson's meagre output as Skull was pretty ace. A bit fucken ornery, but I presume those who are bemoaning trip-hop being too "cafe" would find that a plus. I used to always look out for his name on production credits etc. and was so confused when that Playgroup stuff started surfacing.

What about Skylab's first album? In my mind that holds a fond place with 'UFOrb', where the Orb did a whole synthy techno-influenced take on ambient music while Skylab came at it from the grubby lo-fi hip-hop angle. "I put a seashell to my ear and it all comes back..."

trevor jackson was the underdog wasn't he - he had a hip hop group as well forget what it was called - his mix of massive attacks 'wandering ' with nicolette is skill.
the thing about mo wax is they didn't really have a roster really - most of it was cherrypicked from other labels or people would come in and do one off mixes etc - a truly boutique label - maybe only the excellently strange palmskin productions and unkle were the two mainstays, perhaps krush.

those were funny times, massive dynamics between mo wax-techno/us rza, premier etc hip hop/metalheadz which were pretty amazing. That overmoneyed monkey that ran mo wax was quite a celebrity, more like a pop star, interviewed 100 x more than any of his artists.

michael
11-09-2005, 01:12 AM
still play the Skylab album all the time - somehow, though, never saw either of them as triphop . always saw the howie b stuff as some kind of morphed eno thing with a bit of toop thrown in for good measure
Sorry, I wasn't trying to say The Orb were trip-hop, just drawing a point of comparison between two roughly contemporary releases I used to thrash. Both of them I see as morphed ambient music, mashed up with different more contemporary stuff...

I do remember at the time seeing in various mags 'Seashell' described as the first trip-hop release or something. I definitely think Howie B was right in the middle of what got called trip-hop - his label Pussyfoot was a weird one. Actually, I tend to think of him as an example of trip-hop getting it wrong.. Outside his part in the early Skylab stuff I don't remember him doing much I liked.

To tie a few things together, I was recording my copy of UNKLE's The Time Has Come remixes into the PC. Huge mash-up of Sun Ra samples, essentially... great example of how these things could be at least fairly wide-reaching. The UNKLE mix is a huge sprawling thing which goes into a massive acid wig-out by the end. Then you've got a Portishead mix that's really intense (simple but damn apt description used upthread), all harsh tremolo guitar and loud theremin. Howie B has a little Glass-like synth arpeggio plus muddy hip-hop beats and a sorta Silver Apples type bassline - both bass and beats suddenly go double-speed.. it doesn't sound jungle.. it sounds dumb. Then Plaid (at that time still with The Black Dog) drop in with .. well, decent Black Dog tracks circa 'Spanners', essentially. Big, locked down beats and layers and layers of shiny sinth melodies piling up in interesting ways.

"The time has come ... to go out of your mind"

michael
11-09-2005, 01:15 AM
trevor jackson was the underdog wasn't he - he had a hip hop group as well forget what it was called - his mix of massive attacks 'wandering ' with nicolette is skill.

Think the tune's called 'Sly', just to be a trainspotter... it's pretty great.

The hip-hop group he produced was called The Brotherhood.. I remember he also released a double album of Underdog productions, but I didn't buy it. Gave it a listen at the time, but would have no idea what it sounded like now, really.

Pearsall
11-09-2005, 03:54 AM
The Brotherhood album was really good! I still listen to it today. Luscious production.

mms
11-09-2005, 02:35 PM
Haha, I was listening to this at the gym today. I feel like such a yuppie listening to trendy obscure shit on my digital music player while working out. Oh wait, maybe because I am...

Anyway, yeah, it's a great collection of tracks he's put out on EPs. It's got all the hallmarks of 60s and 70s trippy shit.. reversed bits and pieces and strange harp sounds and cool bass (guitar) lines and his hazed out vocals.. Sorta the meeting point between shoegaze and trip-hop, yet despite how that might sound it's actually good. ;)

Also great that the tracks are short.

The album on Stones Throw is a collection of previously released EPs. I first heard of him via a remix he did for Four Tet, which was really good. From memory Four Tet also released Koushik's first EP, 'Battle Rhymes for Battle Times'. Haha... I love the fact he sings that line in a muffled blur that doesn't sound at all tough. :)

he remixed madvillain as well and they're well good those mixes.
its easyto dismiss that sort of thing esp after rjd2 who just aint much cop but i reckon this dude has something else

mms
11-09-2005, 02:37 PM
Think the tune's called 'Sly', just to be a trainspotter... it's pretty great.

The hip-hop group he produced was called The Brotherhood.. I remember he also released a double album of Underdog productions, but I didn't buy it. Gave it a listen at the time, but would have no idea what it sounded like now, really.
yes and yes.
it's great that one
the brotherhood and look where he's ended up..

hamarplazt
11-09-2005, 04:48 PM
I second the Earthling sentiment...whatever happened to them/him?..."my gosh, my gosh, I'm Juliette Binoche"...we need more of that...
"I went to play a little black jack in the casino, the man dealing cards looked like Brian Eno"

I've no idea what happened to Earthling, except that the rapper Mau appeared on a 2nd Gen-album last year.

hint
11-09-2005, 05:17 PM
I've no idea what happened to Earthling, except that the rapper Mau appeared on a 2nd Gen-album last year.

There's a "lost album" sitting on a shelf somewhere, by all accounts.

m99188868
26-08-2014, 08:48 AM
Even twenty years (!) after Dummy I have to admit that some so-called triphop aged really well. I recently listened to some old discs and I can't put my finger on the reason though.

Could it be the implicit belief of authenticity/sincerity/simplicity that much of triphop carries? The lack of self-relativation? Sure, it has all been used and abused in adverts, coffee shops, boutiques, etc. But does that not prove the point that it carried some kind of sentiment considered real enough to appropriate for other purposes?

Note how from this perspective, triphop and the currently fashionable seapunk are completely, diagonally different.

CrowleyHead
26-08-2014, 07:54 PM
What's seapunk?

Trip-Hop actually sounds hideously dated to me. Can't stand most of Dummy, or nearly any of Massive Attack. Early Tricky works, until he gets into the rock thing way too much.

trza
26-08-2014, 08:04 PM
I think Tricky was too out of his mind on drugs, he just had his producer make all the music on Maxinquaye.

Anyway, the terrible horrible very bad listmakers at Rolling Stone gave us this gem of all the music I never want to listen to again from the year Dummy came out
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/1994-the-40-best-records-from-mainstream-alternatives-greatest-year-20140417

Leo
26-08-2014, 08:41 PM
i wish i could return to the first time i heard "dummy", it was so fresh and different and great. i honestly haven't been able to listen to it in decades, which is sad because it shouldn't have to suffer just because of the trip hop wave that followed. "maxinquaye" is easier to listen to today, i guess because it's a bit more varied and fucked up sounding.

"dummy" is one of those great records that i'll probably never have an interest in hearing again.

rubberdingyrapids
27-08-2014, 12:32 PM
i like trip hop stuff way more now than i did at the time when i thought it was just hip hop for people that didnt like rapping, which was maybe true, but now i just think, well whats wrong with not liking rapping?

not really including massive attack in that though. more the dj vadim type stuff.
but a lot of it sounds great now.

connect_icut
27-08-2014, 03:57 PM
Haven't read back through the thread to see if anyone has already made these points but...

1. Dummy sounds dead contemporary because of all the compression

2. Like many people, I recently discovered Leslie Winer's Witch, a proto-trip-hop classic from 1990 - highly recommended, if you haven't heard it yet

m99188868
28-08-2014, 09:04 AM
What's seapunk?

More on this thread. (http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=13352&highlight=seapunk) It's Tumblr-music, mostly, if that makes sense. Some stuff is very good though (cf. Fatima al Qadiri).

Gonna check that Witch proto-triphop now, thanks connect_icut.

About outdated yay/nay: compression is probably a factor. At the same time, I think trip hop really succeeded very well (and probably too easily) in what essentially all music more or less tries to accomplish, ie. to create a mood or sentiment that resonates in the listener. It still works -or at least so it seems for some of us.

Leo
28-08-2014, 11:45 AM
zinc likes it: http://www.factmag.com/2014/08/27/my-favourite-record-dj-zinc/

connect_icut
28-08-2014, 09:00 PM
For anyone who gets bitten by the Leslie Winer bug, I highly recommend the compilation of her stuff Touch put out and the big article The Quietus did a while back http://thequietus.com/articles/10505-leslie-winer-witch-interview

trza
28-08-2014, 10:42 PM
Zinc likes the self-titled album from 1997, if I am reading the article correctly.