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View Full Version : what are your favourite grime slang terms?



captain easychord
15-10-2004, 05:01 PM
in the interest of compiling a compendium of grime-isms i call for y'all to post your faves.


my fave, GRAFT.

i love how it's used in both the FWD and bashment scenes. (differently). in bashment it refers to the hustle, gettin' by. in FWD it takes on a futurist tone evocative of the fusion of metal and biology, skin graft, cybernetics, clangey machinery...

what are yours?

blissblogger
15-10-2004, 05:49 PM
really like the way "road" has replaced "street"

it just sounds wrong, but in a good, stop you in your tracks way

"merk" is good too, sounds quite unpleasant

i heard one mc use the word "stiff" as a praise term, like "stiff beats" but don't know if that has any currency

i wonder if there's a slanguage graveyard where prototype terms that didn't take off go -- i remember in hardcore days a brief vogue for "shovelling" as in ... "that's a shovelling tune, mate"... :D :D

captain easychord
15-10-2004, 05:56 PM
ya mos def "road" is a highlight. it's so quaint compared to "street" LOL. "slew" is almost as good as "merk".

captain easychord
15-10-2004, 06:03 PM
i like how grime slanguage emphasizes being fortright. there's this kind of honour about it, a sense of the virtuous. MC's are always going on about things being "real", "serious" (all those skepta tracks for example), wiley always banging on about "trust me" (that track on the creeper tape) etc.

DavidD
15-10-2004, 08:20 PM
merk is from american hip-hop isn't it? Or maybe dancehall. I donno 50 Cent and others say it all the time, i didn't think it was grime-originated.

I have to say "graft" sounds pretty cool though.

luka
16-10-2004, 02:24 PM
the vast majority of grime slang is pilfered, either from us hiphop slang, jamaian patios or cockney, often criminal slang, but it'#s still good. my current favourite is baffed as in baffled, confused,
i was quite baffed bruv. chung is another favourite.

mms
16-10-2004, 03:44 PM
i like the term standard, meaning really good.

simon silverdollar
16-10-2004, 05:33 PM
got to be 'slewage'!

and 'merkery'

and 'dekos' for decks.

mpc
16-10-2004, 07:41 PM
i like the term standard, meaning really good.

not totally accurate.

standard is usually used to agree unconditionally with what someone has said. i haven't really explained thatvery well.....er..... an example:

Q: did u play the new jon e cash dubplate last night?
A: yeah, standard

'standard' kind of means 'obviously' or "goes without saying"

terms / phrases i like to use (usually in random text messages):

tools (=weapons)
don't watch no face.
never forget ur ends
on a regular
top form / top boy etc.

mms
16-10-2004, 10:40 PM
yeah you are righter than i ws right i think.

hint
17-10-2004, 02:39 PM
I like:

good
hectic

bad
swag


and in reference to the term merk / murk I think it means different things in grime terms than it does in hip hop...

grime = to beat someone in a battle / generally kill it on the mic / murder

hip hop = seems to mean the same thing, but also something to do with escaping / hiding?


A lot a niggas is livin with these circumstances,
Sp's the same i still murk ya manz'z,
Drug money to rap money work advances,
Niggas ran and told that i shoulda murked to kansas

captain easychord
17-10-2004, 03:44 PM
it seems that grime twists the meaning of hip hop slang. "bare" for e.g.. in grime it means tons, an abundance. but in USHH it means none, a lack...

how could i have forgotten "blood". one of the tops for sure... (meaning a fellow, kinda like "rudeboy".)

Backjob
18-10-2004, 07:06 AM
'llow it.

originaldrum
18-10-2004, 07:47 AM
road has got be on top

MolexRoots
18-10-2004, 08:51 PM
'Road' is good, I intend to use it more. I don't like 'nang' (meaning either good or bad, I've heard it in both contexts). I rarely use 'dawg' or 'blood', mostly because the majority of my friends would laugh at me for saying it. Would refering to Jamaica as 'JA' be considered street slang? If so, that's another good'n.

My fave... 'yard' (meaning house or home).

mpc
18-10-2004, 08:52 PM
favourites of mine:

don't get it twisted

reppin

and what?!

BLAP/BLAPSE

mans

mpc
18-10-2004, 09:02 PM
ALSO:

"allow it"

be.jazz
18-10-2004, 09:53 PM
Are these terms meant to have originated in grime, or just been appropriated by it? I mean, "yard?"

HMGovt
18-10-2004, 10:16 PM
Bare = mobbed

Nang = good

Chief = nobhead

Least favourite: it's all good.

HMGovt
18-10-2004, 10:22 PM
What's that dizzee says - "arms house"?

Ends, skens, menz

MolexRoots
18-10-2004, 10:33 PM
I tihink it's Alm's House but I'm not exactly sure what it means (Capleton's album "Alm's House"). I won't embarrass myself with a poor guess.

simon silverdollar
18-10-2004, 10:52 PM
it is 'armshouse'. means an argument/fight.

and it's one of the main reasons why i LOVE Demon. 'youdon'twannabring armshouse' etc.

for me, that still sends shivers...

i also like how grime artists use 'skank' for dance. i know that's not specifically a grime thing, but i like the idea of phrasing like that keeping the links to ska and rocksteady alive.

MolexRoots
18-10-2004, 11:24 PM
"I'll bring armshouse to ya mum's house." That made me laugh first time I heard it. November 8th, Forward full retail on Relentless. Cop that disc.

bun-u
19-10-2004, 12:55 PM
Brap!!

jack
19-10-2004, 02:30 PM
addressing things to 'soundboy'

hoo-ay hoo-ay though what it actually means is beyond me.

Ach!
19-10-2004, 04:07 PM
"Trust me I'm NIPSY, your beenie come to try tease me"

Tinchy Strider, baffing me again - Vandross what's the answer?

droid
20-10-2004, 09:32 AM
it is 'armshouse'. means an argument/fight.

and it's one of the main reasons why i LOVE Demon. 'youdon'twannabring armshouse' etc.

for me, that still sends shivers...

i also like how grime artists use 'skank' for dance. i know that's not specifically a grime thing, but i like the idea of phrasing like that keeping the links to ska and rocksteady alive.

As molex pointed out above - i reckon this term does come from the reggae/JA term 'Alms House' which, AFAIK, is a place were people go to 'recover', an 'Alms house' is usually a place that heals the sick, the poor and needy.. a house that gives out 'alms'..

Ive noticed Capleton using it a lot myself, but theres loads of old reggae tunes that use the same term as well. And i think through the polarising filter of the Reggae scriptures, it's come to mean a place of spirtual rather then physical healing.

The Grime/Demon/Dizzee version of it is a fuck-up IMO. They obviously thought that Capleton and his mates were saying 'ARMS-house' meaning a fight or whatever, when in fact they were saying 'ALMS'-house, meaning the exact opposite..

its pretty funny really: - "ill bring arms house to your mums house!" -

how could they get it so wrong???

blissblogger
20-10-2004, 01:46 PM
almshouse isn't a JA word, though, it's an old English term -- goes back to the Middle Ages -- 1300's acc to my dictionary -- "a private establishment for housing the poor" -- alms itself going back further still and meaning money, food or other donations for the poor or needy -- there's an almshouse in my hometown Berkhamsted (the building is still there, but it's used for something else now)

i'm pretty certain the almshouse/armshouse pun goes back much further than Grime, reckon the conflation/semantic shift must have originated in Jamaica, and thence migrated to London -- there's been jungle tunes with Armshouse in the title

Ach!
20-10-2004, 02:02 PM
I always thought it had a more literal meaning: "it was armshouse up in there" - i.e. the presence of guns. Maybe I'm wrong.

Woebot
20-10-2004, 02:08 PM
almshouse isn't a JA word, though, it's an old English term -- goes back to the Middle Ages -- 1300's acc to my dictionary -- "a private establishment for housing the poor" -- alms itself going back further still and meaning money, food or other donations for the poor or needy -- there's an almshouse in my hometown Berkhamsted (the building is still there, but it's used for something else now)

i'm pretty certain the almshouse/armshouse pun goes back much further than Grime, reckon the conflation/semantic shift must have originated in Jamaica, and thence migrated to London -- there's been jungle tunes with Armshouse in the title

thats the funny thing about patois isn't it, its something i looked at when i studied linguistics, its chockablock with c18th "legacy" english, about which point I guess Jamaica was abandoned by the UK (cringes as someone is about to hit me over the head with my historical innacuracy). nevertheless the point stands.

originaldrum
20-10-2004, 10:21 PM
almshouse isn't a JA word, though, it's an old English term -- goes back to the Middle Ages -- 1300's acc to my dictionary -- "a private establishment for housing the poor" -- alms itself going back further still and meaning money, food or other donations for the poor or needy -- there's an almshouse in my hometown Berkhamsted (the building is still there, but it's used for something else now)

i'm pretty certain the almshouse/armshouse pun goes back much further than Grime, reckon the conflation/semantic shift must have originated in Jamaica, and thence migrated to London -- there's been jungle tunes with Armshouse in the title


true true,

certainly brings a new twist to dee double's

"nowadays i'm on alms just like a bangle!"

fairly anti-bling eh!

MolexRoots
21-10-2004, 09:07 AM
I'm fairly new to the grime scene and I've become really taken with D Double E's styling. It doesn't sound like most of the other UKG MCs which is great. My brother, who is a commericial hip hop head, thinks " 'e sounds stoop'd"; hardly an opinion to grab on to. Dancehall has Ele for the lisp, UKG has D Double, hehe.

droid
21-10-2004, 09:26 AM
almshouse isn't a JA word, though, it's an old English term -- goes back to the Middle Ages -- 1300's acc to my dictionary -- "a private establishment for housing the poor" -- alms itself going back further still and meaning money, food or other donations for the poor or needy -- there's an almshouse in my hometown Berkhamsted (the building is still there, but it's used for something else now)

i'm pretty certain the almshouse/armshouse pun goes back much further than Grime, reckon the conflation/semantic shift must have originated in Jamaica, and thence migrated to London -- there's been jungle tunes with Armshouse in the title


Defo right on the first bit.. although they only time that Ive ever heard the term used outside a period drama is on reggae/dancehall records (or on reggae record labels).. which i suppose is why i called it a JA term..

im not so sure that the punning was done in Jamaica though.. ive listened to a decent amount of dancehall/Soundclash/radio shows etc.. over the past 10 years, and ive never heard the term 'arms-house' once.. I reckon it really is just a mistake (although quite an endearing one). Imagine if the More fire crew had being listening to Capleton one day before they thought up their name,.. misheard his lyrics, and called themselves the 'Moth fire' crew instead? i think its that kinda buzz...

My own take on how the term 'Alms-house' is used by Capleton, is that its very similar to a 'balm-yard', ie: a place where healing is done or spells are lifted.. (but im probably totally wrong about this) in Jamaica in general, I think its now just common slang for any act of charity..

"Mi nah lie stilll enuh Natty but a pure almshouse you kip up on dah forum yah. *You caan start a thread about aiding Jamaica/Grenada or Cayman during this tragedy? *You too eaga fi trace oman...use you energy to something more positive star. "

from this brilliant forum:

http://www.jamaicastar.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.pl?board=new;action=display;num=1095362944

droid
21-10-2004, 09:37 AM
I'm fairly new to the grime scene and I've become really taken with D Double E's styling. It doesn't sound like most of the other UKG MCs which is great. My brother, who is a commericial hip hop head, thinks " 'e sounds stoop'd"; hardly an opinion to grab on to. Dancehall has Ele for the lisp, UKG has D Double, hehe.

I love his Mooey Mooey's! Although he seems to be phasing tham out these days..

it reminds me again of Dancehall DJ's - of Snagglepuss and Goofy - or Beenie mans' na na na's'.. those little vocal twists and trademarks that make the MC instantly recognisable to the audience..

Flyboy
21-10-2004, 01:43 PM
First time I heard 'Learn' I thought Dizzee's "arms house" would be where he keeps his arms - a big unmarked warehouse full of guns and weaponry somewhere in East London. And you just know that whoever he's talking to claims they have a warehouse full of guns too but they don't really: "If you can't back up arms house, who the fuck are you?"

Even though I now know better, I can't seem to shake that image.

MolexRoots
21-10-2004, 01:48 PM
I 'eard a Dizzee / D Double collabo a few weeks ago. Think it's called "Give Me More". Any idea how I can get hold of it or anyone seen it about?

blissblogger
21-10-2004, 01:56 PM
another one that always stops me in my tracks:

"giving brains" as Grimespeak for "giving head"

also, on merkery -- like the way it sounds a bit like mockery -- verbal GBH, murdering other people's egos

originaldrum
21-10-2004, 10:24 PM
I 'eard a Dizzee / D Double collabo a few weeks ago. Think it's called "Give Me More". Any idea how I can get hold of it or anyone seen it about?

"give u more" is is the flipside of the first single (stand up tall) from dizzee's new album,

the riddim track is otherwise known as WHEEL and has been majorly caned by many a pirate for as long as i can remember (or get my hands on to be precise)

luka
24-10-2004, 11:05 AM
yeah alms became arms long before demon. capleton was using it in the arms sense.

originaldrum
15-11-2004, 01:55 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/1xtra/events/hgweekend04/slangtionary.shtml


brap!

Terror Danjah Australis
15-11-2004, 03:12 AM
not a slang term, but it deserves mentioning: on the great Lord of the Mics DVD, in all the bits between the battles where MCs say 'yo i'm whoever, this is lotm' or advertise record shops and Garvey's Barber shop, everybody ends half their sentences with ", yeah?" I love it, it seems like a combination of the sentiments expressed in "innit?" (mentioned by ma bro on the "cool" thread) and all those terms like "trust me" and bless and "you know (the koo)". These guys are on intimate terms with their audience, they're neighbours, they understand each other, they're down, know the score etc, yeah? There's so much love in the grime scene to make up for all the hate. (...sorry, took acid the other day)

also, nobody's mentioned this, have they? from a "golden oldie", Wiley's 'I Will Not Lose':

cant see me in the manor
willy just creep through the manor
bare gun man in my manor
niggers dont care in the manor
you might get jacked in the manor
some of them chat shit in the manor
i know, cause i use to be a prick in my manor
learn nuff tings in the manor
stay very low in the manor
no holds barr in the manor gonna show them
the blazing fire, the flame to make i break your set
take it to the neck and i say
you know im gonna take it to the neck and a sket
cause im a veteran
check out this lyrical flex
im a chedda man not begga man
gal wedger man, a bigger man
quite clever man, flop, never man
incase you wanna know, e3 thats a manor
now we're gonna hit em with the slammer

And let's not forget "roll deep", although the only non-Roll Deep member I can think of right now who used it is Shystie (she's underrated but she's a bit of a biter, calls herself a pitbull in a skirt and all). Is rolling deep the exact opposite of flossing, blazing, getting one's shine on etc? ...which reminds me, it's funny how blaze can mean merk as well as shine. "If you wanna be John Wayne on the road then go ahed you will get blazed on the road" not really a contradiction at all though is it

luka
15-11-2004, 07:31 AM
rolling deep just means moving with a lot of people. basically being on street with a crew.

Terror Danjah Australis
16-11-2004, 02:49 AM
"When I ask Wiley and fellow Roll Deep members to describe the meaning behind their name and the phrase Deep Roller (for those who donít know) they colourfully explain that it means being low key, minding your own, not being inna peoples business and following your own trail and thatís exactly what these guys are about."
-http://rolldeep.co.uk/crew.html

luka
16-11-2004, 06:47 AM
'don't get it twisted, if you roll deep, you roll deep with your mans dem'

they always lie in those interviews.

luka
16-11-2004, 07:48 AM
'i'm twenty deep
you're with two boys'

originaldrum
16-11-2004, 07:51 AM
bare jokes......


here (http://john_mpc.blogspot.com/2004/11/band-aid.html#comments)

simon silverdollar
16-11-2004, 09:16 AM
forgot to mention this one:
"shanguli" which is a word roll deep invented. means getting through things by the skin of yr teeth apparently. wiley said in an old rwd interview that his 'devil' mixes are now 'shanguli' mixes.

i love the idea of making up words.

nomos
19-12-2004, 02:52 AM
Just looked up road at UrbanDictionary dot com:

Road

A secret and racist term for a black person. Comes from the cockney rhyming slang, road-digger = nigger.

(walking through Brixton)
BARE roads rand 'ere innit blud...

I don't know if this is completely obvious to London folk, or if it's even accurate. But that + blud - which I've heard a bit on the pirates - might be instances of terms being claimed and redefined. Anyone?

rob_giri
19-12-2004, 06:17 AM
kinda like the use of 'boy' - boy in da corner, eskiboy etc. powerlessness as realness, undergroundness etc

nick.K
19-12-2004, 10:32 AM
not so much slang as body-language. it's the way the 'crews' around here hold their phones as if they were microphones when things are heated or they're singin on the street - holding the speaker in their palm and the microphone bit over their mouths - as if they're a correspondent, broadcasting, reporting on what's going on around them and don't care what the person on the other end has to say. i looked for a picture to illustrate this, but it's not happening

hint
19-12-2004, 10:44 AM
autonomic... - I'd personally be amazed if the scene's use of the word road has anything to do with the cockney rhyming slang - I've certainly never heard the term "road digger" used in that way... and regardless, the current slang use of the word road just means the same as "the hood" or "the streets" so there is a very obvious connection between the slang term and its meaning.

anyway - I'm glad this topic has resurfaced, cos I now have a new favourite:

BIG BOY ON THE BUTTONS :D

sean downes
19-12-2004, 12:09 PM
those blacks dont half talk funny, eh chaps?

mpc
19-12-2004, 12:12 PM
"on the buttons" is a classic.

new favourite (as used by trim i think):

shout to logan sama a.k.a. osama bin logan

nomos
19-12-2004, 04:45 PM
and regardless, the current slang use of the word road just means the same as "the hood" or "the streets" so there is a very obvious connection between the slang term and its meaning.

True, yeah. I was just wondering whether there might be some small rhizomic connection to the other sense of the term - whether through ironic reference or otherwise.

And how long 'til someone grabs bigboyonthebuttons.blogspot.com? :cool:

nick.K
19-12-2004, 08:55 PM
those blacks dont half talk funny, eh chaps?
Quite. this inter web lark is truely a miracle of the modern age. bringing us together, wot?

Woebot
19-01-2005, 08:42 AM
"u kno dis"

as in, this should be a self-evident truth...........

bun-u
19-01-2005, 09:03 AM
I like the strange use of the word 'though'

for instance when somebody says 'Wiley is big though' but the 'though' is not contradicting anything said before

owen
19-01-2005, 12:46 PM
i like the dismissive 'any' or 'anything' as in 'them boys are anything'

Red Rooster
19-01-2005, 04:51 PM
I'm still new to the grime sound but not the slang!

"You get AIR blud"

"Them man are ANYTHING"

"You SPENG"

"SEKKLE"

They are a few of my faves :D

captain easychord
19-01-2005, 05:50 PM
gotta luv the "ls's"
biggle
over biggle
swag
swaggle

and in one hilarious case

swaggle rock, as in "that tune is swaggle rock" lol.

h-crimm
19-01-2005, 09:17 PM
one of the funniest things to me is when i'm listening to a song i've loved for ages and all of a sudden i get a little realisation of what some of the words mean, it can be quite shocking...

i'm quite a fan of ting like "what creps u bussin?" uhmmm .. "u cant draw gash" tho gash is quite an offensive one...

cotch is nice, link, aggie brehs, make ps, everyone inside,
bars, rammed, long, nizzer,

does anyone know what chaps means? as in "nice girl, nice car, chaps and a chain" from furys reply to demon on gash

gyalist, sconse, don, shotta, sket, sweet boy, bo'cat... types of people?

isnt boy a turning round of how police talk to yute on road... patronising like "are you boys being good?"
so in the RESPECT footage from risky roads they call the police boys, and call each other it too to disarm it

the way i understand youdunwannabringarmsouse is as 'bring arms out' with the out mixed up with the german aus (which means out) and part of that missing consonants ting... then its "you dont want to bring your weapons out with you to show off because i could take weapons around to your mums house and you wouldnt like that cos you actually arent a gangster at all" or 'if you can back armsouse who the fuck are you?' is something like "if youre carrying weapons youre giving the impression that youre going to back the show up with actual acts of violence, since youre not prepared to do that dont carry them in the first place" ... okay so i kno i'm reading them as far more anti weapons than they were meant :) ... then d double says "my mum will cause arms'aus"
it cant be arms house cos the always ryme it with house and that would make for pretty swag bars...
theres plenty of weapon words... zugga, brat, bora, gatt, cosh... not sure which is which...

did anyone ever work out what crazy titch is saying to DR at the peak of conflict when maxwell D is going lalalala to try and cover it up? it could be mutt as in mullato or mixed race but thats hardly offensive... and DR looks quite pissed off...

captain easychord
19-01-2005, 09:50 PM
one of the funniest things to me is when i'm listening to a song i've loved for ages and all of a sudden i get a little realisation of what some of the words mean, it can be quite shocking...

i'm quite a fan of ting like "what creps u bussin?" uhmmm .. "u cant draw gash" tho gash is quite an offensive one...

cotch is nice, link, aggie brehs, make ps, everyone inside,
bars, rammed, long, nizzer,

does anyone know what chaps means? as in "nice girl, nice car, chaps and a chain" from furys reply to demon on gash

gyalist, sconse, don, shotta, sket, sweet boy, bo'cat... types of people?

isnt boy a turning round of how police talk to yute on road... patronising like "are you boys being good?"
so in the RESPECT footage from risky roads they call the police boys, and call each other it too to disarm it

the way i understand youdunwannabringarmsouse is as 'bring arms out' with the out mixed up with the german aus (which means out) and part of that missing consonants ting... then its "you dont want to bring your weapons out with you to show off because i could take weapons around to your mums house and you wouldnt like that cos you actually arent a gangster at all" or 'if you can back armsouse who the fuck are you?' is something like "if youre carrying weapons youre giving the impression that youre going to back the show up with actual acts of violence, since youre not prepared to do that dont carry them in the first place" ... okay so i kno i'm reading them as far more anti weapons than they were meant :) ... then d double says "my mum will cause arms'aus"
it cant be arms house cos the always ryme it with house and that would make for pretty swag bars...
theres plenty of weapon words... zugga, brat, bora, gatt, cosh... not sure which is which...

did anyone ever work out what crazy titch is saying to DR at the peak of conflict when maxwell D is going lalalala to try and cover it up? it could be mutt as in mullato or mixed race but thats hardly offensive... and DR looks quite pissed off...

part of me wants to believe he's caling dizzee a "mook" (a la 'mean streets').

CT: "You're a mook"
DR: "I'm not a mook!"
D Double E: "What's a mook?"

Red Rooster
19-01-2005, 10:23 PM
You don't wanna bring armshouse is correct.

Armshouse means beef basically. "the rave was bare armshouse"

"Chaps" is another word for a bracelet.

Pearsall
19-01-2005, 10:53 PM
gyalist, sconse, don, shotta, sket, sweet boy, bo'cat... types of people?


shotta - drug dealer
sket - slut
sweet boy - ladies man (I think?)

simon silverdollar
19-01-2005, 11:26 PM
one of the funniest things to me is when i'm listening to a song i've loved for ages and all of a sudden i get a little realisation of what some of the words mean, it can be quite shocking...

i'm quite a fan of ting like "what creps u bussin?" uhmmm .. "u cant draw gash" tho gash is quite an offensive one...

cotch is nice, link, aggie brehs, make ps, everyone inside,
bars, rammed, long, nizzer,

does anyone know what chaps means? as in "nice girl, nice car, chaps and a chain" from furys reply to demon on gash

gyalist, sconse, don, shotta, sket, sweet boy, bo'cat... types of people?

isnt boy a turning round of how police talk to yute on road... patronising like "are you boys being good?"
so in the RESPECT footage from risky roads they call the police boys, and call each other it too to disarm it

the way i understand youdunwannabringarmsouse is as 'bring arms out' with the out mixed up with the german aus (which means out) and part of that missing consonants ting... then its "you dont want to bring your weapons out with you to show off because i could take weapons around to your mums house and you wouldnt like that cos you actually arent a gangster at all" or 'if you can back armsouse who the fuck are you?' is something like "if youre carrying weapons youre giving the impression that youre going to back the show up with actual acts of violence, since youre not prepared to do that dont carry them in the first place" ... okay so i kno i'm reading them as far more anti weapons than they were meant :) ... then d double says "my mum will cause arms'aus"
it cant be arms house cos the always ryme it with house and that would make for pretty swag bars...
theres plenty of weapon words... zugga, brat, bora, gatt, cosh... not sure which is which...

did anyone ever work out what crazy titch is saying to DR at the peak of conflict when maxwell D is going lalalala to try and cover it up? it could be mutt as in mullato or mixed race but thats hardly offensive... and DR looks quite pissed off...

bo cat= male who performs oral sex on women [derogatory]

i think 'sweet boy' is often used in a derogatory way too- often MCs have a go at Kano for being a 'sweet boy', and in one of his lyrics kano denies being a sweet boy.

nick.K
19-01-2005, 11:40 PM
in da hours = later on

eg: we'll catch up in da hours

luka
20-01-2005, 12:07 AM
'all the sweet boys would be out getting digits'
stormin

descending_sort
29-01-2005, 08:09 PM
I love the increasing frequency with which I hear MCs addressing people as "blood."
The mental image of a bunch of bloods and a bunch of grime MCs meeting in confusion is great.
Maybe some Eazy-E over a garridge riddim is the bridge! East LA<->East London.

Melmoth
29-01-2005, 08:47 PM
What does cotch mean?

hint
29-01-2005, 08:52 PM
koch / kotch / cotch means the same as "chill" / relax

Fiddy
29-01-2005, 10:06 PM
I always thought it had a more literal meaning: "it was armshouse up in there" - i.e. the presence of guns. Maybe I'm wrong.

I'm with you... arms relates to weapons

Also in my opinion 'road' relates to the streets 'you're on road'... that expression in itself also holds different meanings. Some would say 'I'm on road' literally meaning they're out and about while to others 'on road' means your moving in the underworld/dealing in the hustle.

Melchior
30-01-2005, 10:43 PM
I love the increasing frequency with which I hear MCs addressing people as "blood."
The mental image of a bunch of bloods and a bunch of grime MCs meeting in confusion is great.
Maybe some Eazy-E over a garridge riddim is the bridge! East LA<->East London.

Surely blood comes from yardie slang, nt from bloods/crips gang stuff?

Brokeman
01-02-2005, 04:29 AM
I've got to throw in "mucky" as one of my new faves. As in Escobar saying "Skepta, this beat is #$!% mucky" and the beginning of his LOTD freestyle on the Big Bars riddim.
There's something so great about how Grime slang takes words and phrases which sound schoolyard and naive and makes them hard as nails. On this same tip, I love how Jammer (?) very nasally calls for the rewind on LOTD2 while feigning bewilderment.

"Uh? Uh, re reload den?!"

Keith P
01-02-2005, 05:56 AM
IT'S NEKKLE!
SEKKLE!

Jammer came up wth nekkle right?
still no clue what it means.

I'm fond of "swagish" and "long" as well. Funny thing is I tend to find myself slippin and using these words when talking to people online or even in person. Other day I said something to a friend like "that shits long."
They had no fucking clue what I was saying. :confused:

NCM
29-06-2005, 04:33 PM
blud is as in blud claat yardie slang

bringin armshouse wud be bringin all ya crew

Blackdown
29-06-2005, 05:02 PM
part of me wants to believe he's caling dizzee a "mook" (a la 'mean streets').

CT: "You're a mook"
DR: "I'm not a mook!"
D Double E: "What's a mook?"

this has always bothered me too. is it a mut? mook? mutt?

that piece of footage on Conflict is mesmerising, especially the bit when they spill out onto the roof...

gumdrops
29-06-2005, 05:13 PM
i like

wasteman
biggle
murkery
straight murking
murkology
murkosis
brap
brappery

Blackdown
29-06-2005, 05:30 PM
bunglings
dem way der
and of course, gash ;)

gumdrops
29-06-2005, 05:32 PM
"so much gash, no time to wait!"

boy better know
29-06-2005, 05:49 PM
I love "Are You MUUUDD?!?"

also, shabby is a good one that i don't think anyone's mentioned yet.

also, a phrase which RWD forum users will be familiar with, "I Beg You upload that, Nuttin Long" includes 2 of my favourites

I like the use of "still" as well, e.g. "yeah, that set was quite big, still."


My favourite though, is "Shower"/"Showerface".

cooper
29-06-2005, 06:14 PM
theres plenty of weapon words... zugga, brat, bora, gatt, cosh... not sure which is which...


bora = "borer"; .22 air pellet pistol that's been bored out to accept a .22 cartridge. don't know if any of the others are specific.
"bring ya borer, bring ya mash" - what's dizzee saying there? is "mash" something specific?
"borer tucked 'tween my waist and my belly-button" - demon

Tactics
29-06-2005, 06:29 PM
I and loads of people around me were saying a lot of this stuff around 12 years ago in secondary school times....grime/garage was not around then....

Tha Megatron
29-06-2005, 09:29 PM
i gotta say mines is "WASTEMAN". i have no idea why but its kinda catchy and its fun to call random people who piss me off in everyday american day to day life a "wasteman". Especially my boss at work!

mega

nonseq
30-06-2005, 12:01 AM
this may sound strange, but I really like the declamations of phone numbers!

Logan Sama
30-06-2005, 01:42 AM
bora = "borer"; .22 air pellet pistol that's been bored out to accept a .22 cartridge. don't know if any of the others are specific.
"bring ya borer, bring ya mash" - what's dizzee saying there? is "mash" something specific?
"borer tucked 'tween my waist and my belly-button" - demon

A logical assumption, but incorrect unfortunately. Bora is something with which you would bore someone with; ie: a Knife

Red Rooster
30-06-2005, 02:08 AM
Correct Logan!

He seems to have got the definition confused with that of "Re-Bore"

which is exactly what he thought borer meant

Circus Lupus
30-06-2005, 04:24 AM
Always wanted to know what 'Pickneys' or 'Pickneez' are since Dizz is doing a lot strictly for them/it/us?

minikomi
30-06-2005, 04:43 AM
means child in patois dont it?

droid
30-06-2005, 09:07 AM
yeah alms became arms long before demon. capleton was using it in the arms sense.

:confused: er... I dont think so. Theres that Capleton LP 'Alms-House' for a start... I reckon Demon (or whoever started using it first in grime) either punned it or misheard it.

gabriel
30-06-2005, 10:25 AM
as far as i've been aware, alms house in jamaican/dancehall parlance has had the same meaning for the past 15-20 years and always means, as someone pointed out, roughly 'beef'. or conflict, fuckery, or any other general kind of badness, aggression or front. it's a very vague term.

e.g. 'i'll bring alms house to your mums house' just means i'll come round to yr mum's and be generally annoying, lairy, possibly violent. similary 'don't talk almshouse if you can't back it up' or whatever the dizzee quote someone mentioned earlier is.

nothing at all to do with arms, though maybe londoners have misheard it and assumed that it's about guns, i don't listen to much grime so i don't know.

i've no idea why it came to mean this at all though, from the original meaning of alms for the poor and all that.

...also as tactics points out, many many of these terms are well old and were not originated in grime, or even the uk: kotch, link, still, pickney, shotta, sket/skettel, gallist, don, bow cat, sekkle/settle and bare (actually a corruption of pure as in 'it was pure madness' or 'there were pure girls in there' - becomes 'pere' in a JA accent then corrupted to 'bare) are all jamaican patois (though some, like skettel - biblical term - are older and/or english in origin)

droid
30-06-2005, 10:43 AM
as far as i've been aware, alms house in jamaican/dancehall parlance has had the same meaning for the past 15-20 years and always means, as someone pointed out, roughly 'beef'. or conflict, fuckery, or any other general kind of badness, aggression or front. it's a very vague term.




Please see page 3 of this thread.. Alms-house in jamaica doesnt and has never (as far as i know - but i could be wrong) meant beef/trouble conflict or aggression, nor it is vague at all. It'\s the exact opposite, as it literally means an 'alms house' for the poor and needy, and is also used to mean 'charity' or good works.

Ive put an example of this upthread.



e.g. 'i'll bring alms house to your mums house' just means i'll come round to yr mum's and be generally annoying, lairy, possibly violent. similary 'don't talk almshouse if you can't back it up' or whatever the dizzee quote someone mentioned earlier is.

nothing at all to do with arms, though maybe londoners have misheard it and assumed that it's about guns, i don't listen to much grime so i don't know.

Nope - dont think so. Theyre clearly saying ARMS house, and not ALMS house, and as you say, i think it was either a (pretty funny) mistake or a deliberate pun.


i've no idea why it came to mean this at all though, from the original meaning of alms for the poor and all that.

Its only come to mean this because grime took the Jamaican 'alms' and turned it into 'arms'. it still means the same thing in Jamaica, and i dont know of a single reggae or dancehall tune or special that says different.

Sorry i brought this up now! ;)

gabriel
30-06-2005, 10:50 AM
Please see page 3 of this thread.. Alms-house in jamaica doesnt and has never (as far as i know - but i could be wrong) meant beef/trouble conflict or aggression, nor it is vague at all. It'\s the exact opposite, as it literally means an 'alms house' for the poor and needy, and is also used to mean 'charity' or good works.

Ive put an example of this upthread.


yeah i read the whole thread, but not at all convinced this is true. i know its literal meaning is 'house of alms' but i'm sure i've heard tonnes of references to the meaning i posted about in reggae/dancehall tunes. will have a dig at some point and pull out some quotes, can't remember any off top of head

possibly, though, the vague/conflict meaning that i refer to is simply a uk one but is old (was used A LOT at my school from about 92-96), and consequently i've attributed it to jamaica. but i'm pretty sure that when it was being used in the early 90s its meaning came direct from the jamaican one.


Nope - dont think so. Theyre clearly saying ARMS house, and not ALMS house, and as you say, i think it was either a (pretty funny) mistake or a deliberate pun.

not sure how the difference between arms and alms is clear, seeing as the two words sound exactly the same?!

droid
30-06-2005, 11:12 AM
yeah i read the whole thread, but not at all convinced this is true. i know its literal meaning is 'house of alms' but i'm sure i've heard tonnes of references to the meaning i posted about in reggae/dancehall tunes. will have a dig at some point and pull out some quotes, can't remember any off top of head

possibly, though, the vague/conflict meaning that i refer to is simply a uk one but is old (was used A LOT at my school from about 92-96), and consequently i've attributed it to jamaica. but i'm pretty sure that when it was being used in the early 90s its meaning came direct from the jamaican one.


Come with the quotes! Ive not been able to find anything other than it being used in Capletons Alms house stuff and the odd soundboy and JA forums mention (in the context of charity). Not saying that meaning doesnt exist in JA - but i aint heard any references...



not sure how the difference between arms and alms is clear, seeing as the two words sound exactly the same?!

:confused: They dont though.. AR -ms sounds very different to AL -ms. Arms always has the AR at the start. Alms is always pronounced with a silent 'L' like aa-ms, or with a normal L as in 'el-ms', which is a very audible difference IMO - and anyway.. isnt that Demon tune actually called 'Armshouse'?

gabriel
30-06-2005, 11:43 AM
LOL, you must have a much more trained ear than me, i swear i can't distinguish at all!

the other meaning it had at my school was similar to 'dark' as in, 'man, that's almshouse' if someone had done something bad etc. an equally inexplicable derivation! no idea if this is ja, uk or other in origin... or just confined to my school :confused:

droid
30-06-2005, 12:46 PM
Hmm... I think we need a definitive answer.. any reggae dons out there know of a tune that mentions an 'Arms house'? Any grime heads know how it came to be used by UK MC's?

gabriel
30-06-2005, 01:57 PM
ok... realised my understanding of 'almshouse' may be informed more by jamaican writings/speech than by dancehall tunes. will still try and dig out some musical references but for now, here's some online stuff

(1) an example of jamaican usage of almshouse as in 'general fuckery'
http://www.dancehallreggae.com/vbbs/showthread.php?t=53292&highlight=almshouse

(2) an example of jamaican usage of almshouse as an adjective, a la 'dark' or 'wrong'
http://www.dancehallreggae.com/vbbs/showthread.php?t=57980&page=2&highlight=almshouse
(scroll down to the post by DEDAINTY1)

gabriel
30-06-2005, 03:10 PM
ok, got some quotes from songs now...

Capleton - 'Alms House'
Almshouse - we nuh want dat boutÖit no right, capleton a step up in a life and a next entertainer a give him a fight

Beres Hammond & Buju Banton - 'Queen and Lady'
You may be someone else lady before but yu ah my girl now, my woman now. Almshouse weh use to gwaan dat caan gwaan no more cause yu ah my girl now, my woman now

Capleton - 'Bun Dem Every Day'
Well all dem promote is just coke and crack
Pon a innocent life di whole a dem a try stop
Wid yuh nurses and yuh docs, yuh soldiers and yuh cops
Yuh churches and yuh synagogues di whole a dem a go flop
Dem a wait pon di body dem fi put inna di box
A wait pon di body deh fi put inna di vault
But a Emperor Selassie seh di alms house fi stop
Well life mi promote soget it straight to di top

-------------

notice the differences in meaning here..

1. infighting between entertainers (capleton goes on to refer to the problems faced by the likes of roundhead, grindsman and panhead and bemoan the fact that in the days of sugar minott and jr reid, there was less feuding between dancehall artists)

2. referring to the early stages of a relationship that needed to be fully resolved, ie buju was upset cos his girl was still with someone else and that is 'almshouse'

3. a synonym for senseless killings in particular, and corruption/babylonian wrongdoing in general




case closed?

droid
30-06-2005, 03:12 PM
ok... realised my understanding of 'almshouse' may be informed more by jamaican writings/speech than by dancehall tunes. will still try and dig out some musical references but for now, here's some online stuff

(1) an example of jamaican usage of almshouse as in 'general fuckery'
http://www.dancehallreggae.com/vbbs/showthread.php?t=53292&highlight=almshouse

(2) an example of jamaican usage of almshouse as an adjective, a la 'dark' or 'wrong'
http://www.dancehallreggae.com/vbbs/showthread.php?t=57980&page=2&highlight=almshouse
(scroll down to the post by DEDAINTY1)

Cant get to the second one without being logged in. The first one is ambiguous to say the least. I dont really know what hes trying to say there at all, but I dont think its quite that straightforward... Im not denying that the term can be used in a negative sense, but I reckon its still related somehow to the original meaning. Ive got a soundclash tape where a Soundboy refers to the other sound: 'dem a almshouse sound! Dem a beg friend an borrow duplate'.. Addies vs Downbeat I think it is.... found an interesting quote as well:

"There is a certain stigma attached to the name 'infirmary,' and the use of terms such as 'poorhouse or almshouse' has a distinctly negative connotation," she argues. "These names convey the idea that these places are for the poorest of the poor in society. (http://www.jis.gov.jm/foreign_affairs/html/20040421T090000-0500_2360_JIS_JAMAICAN_HUMANITARIAN_AIDS_INDIGENT_ COMMUNITY.asp)

I imagine this is something like how the term 'charity case' is used in these ends...

Anyways - still up in the air on this... the more I find out about it, the more of a catch-all phrase this seems to be, in normal conversational use at least..

Any JA readers out there who can clear up this tremendously important point? ;)

gabriel
30-06-2005, 03:20 PM
interesting quote, that sounds like a very plausible explanation for the usage. also would explain the variety of different uses, in that it's employed to give a general, negative connotation.

re: ambiguity - patois is all about this. one would be very hard pressed to find unambiguous definitions of many, if not most, jamaican words... isn't this part of the nature of patois? no one has ever fixed these meanings (or even spellings in many cases) by writing them down and so they change in meaning more than most words IMO, both over time and also in different geographical locations.

EDIT - your link to the quote doesn't work :(

droid
30-06-2005, 03:51 PM
Cool - Ill fix that link now...




1. infighting between entertainers (capleton goes on to refer to the problems faced by the likes of roundhead, grindsman and panhead and bemoan the fact that in the days of sugar minott and jr reid, there was less feuding between dancehall artists)

Youre right about this. But instead of the specific reference youve given above, aint it possible that it just means 'bad behaviour', 'disorganisation' or as you said earlier: 'fuckery' Similar to what you might encounter at an alms-house?


2. referring to the early stages of a relationship that needed to be fully resolved, ie buju was upset cos his girl was still with someone else and that is 'almshouse'

I reckon hes saying there that he was in the 'poorhouse', or in a 'bad state' before he got his girl. Whilst it is in reference to a relationship, the meaning of the word stays roughly the same IMO.


3. a synonym for senseless killings in particular, and corruption/babylonian wrongdoing in general

:confused: Could be. im not sure what those two lines before it mean. Couldnt it just be referring to general bad behaviour?


case closed

Not quite - Ive got a bunch of tunes (from Capleton too) that push the other meaning as well... As it stands at the moment I can see three simultaneous possibile defintions:

Its literal meaning as a place of charity, or an act of charity.

The reverse of above: A charity case, being down and out, bottom of the pile.

General fuckery/Bad Behaviour/General Wrongdoing...

Whatcha think?



Sorry for the thread Hijack btw - but its vital that we clear this up! :)

droid
30-06-2005, 04:00 PM
re: ambiguity - patois is all about this. one would be very hard pressed to find unambiguous definitions of many, if not most, jamaican words... isn't this part of the nature of patois? no one has ever fixed these meanings (or even spellings in many cases) by writing them down and so they change in meaning more than most words IMO, both over time and also in different geographical locations.

Thats a very good point. I think thats the nature of slang in general. it tends to mutate and take on different (even opposite) meanings depending on who uses it... whilst were at it, how do you read 'Tan' in Patois? As in 'see how me tan' or 'tan good'?


That one had me going for ages... :p

gabriel
30-06-2005, 04:28 PM
I reckon hes saying there that he was in the 'poorhouse', or in a 'bad state' before he got his girl. Whilst it is in reference to a relationship, the meaning of the word stays roughly the same IMO.

completely... i wasn't saying that almshouse had a different specific meaning in all of those three situations, rather that it's a word that has a general meaning that is applicable in many different contexts. re: its root, i'm of the opinion that its meaning as put forward by me was removed from the literal meaning a long time ago, and each use now refers to the kind of almshouse that buju and capleton are referring to in their lyrics, rather than constatnly referring back to the original literal meaning. i'm no linguist, but i imagine there's some kind of technical term for this. it reminds me somewhat of the concept 'dead metaphor'.

im not sure what those two lines before it mean. Couldnt it just be referring to general bad behaviour?

"Dem a wait pon di body dem fi put inna di box, A wait pon di body deh fi put inna di vault"
- i read this capleton criticising babylon for encouraging violence and killings, which he then called 'almshouse'. again, a general use...

Ive got a bunch of tunes (from Capleton too) that push the other meaning as well...

be interested to hear that. like i said, i'd only ever noticed the word in its non-literal use, but i never doubted that it had a literal sense too...


Sorry for the thread Hijack btw - but its vital that we clear this up!

LOL. yeah. was too bored at work today! :o

gabriel
30-06-2005, 04:29 PM
whilst were at it, how do you read 'Tan' in Patois? As in 'see how me tan' or 'tan good'?


had always thought of it simply as a corruption/different pronunciation of 'turn'

e.g. how you tan so = how you turn/move so (well)

never really thought it through though...

droid
30-06-2005, 09:01 PM
had always thought of it simply as a corruption/different pronunciation of 'turn'

e.g. how you tan so = how you turn/move so (well)

never really thought it through though...

Pretty much spot on.. I assume it came from 'turn' as well... it basically means something like somones 'stance', or how somebody 'carries' themselves...


be interested to hear that. like i said, i'd only ever noticed the word in its non-literal use, but i never doubted that it had a literal sense too...

Theres some lyrics on Prophecy (I think), and I remember a Luciano tune that mentions it in a literal sense as well... Ill try to dig some out.


LOL. yeah. was too bored at work today!

:cool: Was avoiding a deadline myself! :)

zenmonkey
22-06-2007, 07:06 PM
Can anyone tell me what the following mean: skeng, mash and blix/blicks,

For some reason I think a skeng is a knife. Am I right?
I am presuming that a mash is either a) a machete b) a machine gun c) a mash hammer
or d) some pulverised potatoes.

In the Dizzee Rascal track "Where's the Gs" he says, rhetorically, "Where's the blix? Where's the mash?"

In "fix up, look sharp" he says something along the lines of,

"I've heard the gossip from the street to the slammer,
They're tryin to see if Dizzee stays true to his grammar,
Being a celebrity don't mean shit to me,
Fuck the glitz and glamour, hit them with the (Blitzen hammer/bricks'n'hammer/Blicks n' hammer.)

What does he say? If its Blix - what the crud is a Blix?


Also, in reference to previous references to the way in which language mutates and takes on different (even contradictory) meanings, I once overheard the following conversation.

RUDE BWOY 1) You try dat cheese cake from dat shop over the road?

RUDE BWOY 2) Yeah, bludd.

RUDE BWOY 1) I bought some yesterday bludd. It was raw, ya get me?

RUDE BWOY 2) Standard, bled. Yeah man. (licking his lips)

RUDE BWOY 1) Naah blud, it was Raaaaw!

RUDE BWOY 2) Yeah, I hear you bludd it was Raaaaaaw! (smiling)

RUDE BWOY 1) Nah, ya don't get me. I saw it, yeah, and it look like a angel had made it, bludd. Den me bit it, yeh and it had no BIScuit at da BOttom! Cheesecake s'posed to have BIScuit at the BOTtom. Ya get me it was RAAAAW! (grimacing)

RUDE BWOY 2) Aaaaah - right, it was "Raaaw!" (nods in realisation)

RUDE BWOY 1) Standard

The sight of two people shouting the word "Raw" at eachother in complete bafflement was a hilarious example of how trying to hard to keep up with cool slang can leave you looking plain stupid.

SAFESAFE

zhao
22-06-2007, 07:33 PM
hahaha

mistersloane
22-06-2007, 09:41 PM
Can anyone tell me what the following mean: skeng, mash and blix/blicks,

For some reason I think a skeng is a knife. Am I right?
I am presuming that a mash is either a) a machete b) a machine gun c) a mash hammer
or d) some pulverised potatoes.

In the Dizzee Rascal track "Where's the Gs" he says, rhetorically, "Where's the blix? Where's the mash?"

In "fix up, look sharp" he says something along the lines of,

"I've heard the gossip from the street to the slammer,
They're tryin to see if Dizzee stays true to his grammar,
Being a celebrity don't mean shit to me,
Fuck the glitz and glamour, hit them with the (Blitzen hammer/bricks'n'hammer/Blicks n' hammer.)

What does he say? If its Blix - what the crud is a Blix?



urban dictionary is good on all of these I reckon

Logan Sama
22-06-2007, 10:10 PM
lol

Blix is a knife

Mr. Tea
25-06-2007, 12:06 PM
lol

Blix is a knife

Not quite: to 'Blix' someone is to try to acertain whether or not they're carrying a knife, or indeed a weapon of any kind. Came into usage around 2003.

viktorvaughn
25-06-2007, 12:11 PM
Not quite: to 'Blix' someone is to try to acertain whether or not they're carrying a knife, or indeed a weapon of any kind. Came into usage around 2003.

As in frisk?

Mr. Tea
25-06-2007, 12:14 PM
As in frisk?

Pfft, God knows, it was a very poor gag on Hans Blix.

I have less than no knowledge of grime slang (although I must say, I find there are some real horrowshow slovos you music vecks are coming out with here...).

benjybars
26-06-2007, 03:36 PM
i really enjoyed skepta's 'one man skeng daddy' phase...

viktorvaughn
26-06-2007, 06:27 PM
'Are you stupendous!??' - Footsie

rockypoppy2
26-06-2007, 07:14 PM
terms / phrases i like to use (usually in random text messages):

tools (=weapons)
don't watch no face.
never forget ur ends
on a regular
top form / top boy etc.

haha who would you ever text that to?

rockypoppy2
26-06-2007, 07:24 PM
In the Dizzee Rascal track "Where's the Gs" he says, rhetorically, "Where's the blix? Where's the mash?"

In "fix up, look sharp" he says something along the lines of,

"I've heard the gossip from the street to the slammer,
They're tryin to see if Dizzee stays true to his grammar,
Being a celebrity don't mean shit to me,
Fuck the glitz and glamour, hit them with the (Blitzen hammer/bricks'n'hammer/Blicks n' hammer.)

What does he say? If its Blix - what the crud is a Blix?



i always thought it was blitz von clapper- an old german gun - maybe its just my ears
that cheesecake thing is jokes

D double - im chatting bare reality
love it

mos dan
17-09-2009, 12:52 PM
one for the 'questions you are too scared to ask..' or a JA thread maybe, but this is the only thread i could find with 'slang' in the title:

what is the origin of the phrase 'dun your dance'? where was it first used and why are you dunning it? obviously i know what it means in context. thx!