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satanmcnugget
22-10-2004, 01:43 AM
saw this http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0826416152/103-8621346-4789455?v=glance on Sherburne's blog...was wondering if anybody here has read it yet?

but beyond that i havent read a really good book on music since Simon Reynold's Generation Ecstasy...any recommendations?

Pearsall
22-10-2004, 01:46 AM
Not read that.

The most fun book I've ever read about music was the Motley Crue autobiography The Dirt (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0060989157/qid=1098409546/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/002-3909080-9911200?v=glance&s=books&n=507846). I have no interest in their music but it's a compulsive page turner.

You might be after something more serious, though.

satanmcnugget
22-10-2004, 01:54 AM
laffs...i can almost imagine what that one is about without even reading it..pageturner, indeed, especially if debauchery is your thing :)

confession: i was a HUGE Crue fan as a teen...makes devil horn signs at the room! :)

Pearsall
22-10-2004, 02:03 AM
laffs...i can almost imagine what that one is about without even reading it..pageturner, indeed, especially if debauchery is your thing :)

confession: i was a HUGE Crue fan as a teen...makes devil horn signs at the room! :)

And your imagination is, well, almost certainly correct.

Backjob
22-10-2004, 02:08 AM
"Love saves the day; a history of american dance culture 1970-79" is absolutely bloody incredible. Solidly researched, and full of great first-hand anecdotes and loads of great musical recommendations. Really inspiring.

Flyboy
22-10-2004, 09:26 AM
Currently reading Seduced and Abandoned: Essays On Gay Men And Popular Music by Richard Smith which I heartily recommend - it's not entirely dissimilar to Jon Savage's Time Travel - ie, a bunch of short pieces on individual bands or movements or issues, which are connected by various ideas about pop, culture, sexuality, etc. These books only work if the author is a pop fan first and a theorist second (so I reckon, anyway), which both these two are, fortunately.

wonk_vitesse
22-10-2004, 10:37 AM
For those in London, 'Give the anarchist a cigarette' by Mick Farren provides a fascinating insight into the early psychedelic scene. He was the doorman for the UFO club and saw it all. It's interesting to note the similarities and differences in London's night life back then. His description of the Ally Pally gig in '67 where Pink Floyd played is very memorable. He describes a whole emergent culture we take for granted now becoming real under his feet.

mms
22-10-2004, 11:16 AM
recently read Lords of chaos about norwegian black metallers and their ideas and practices, basically an investigation of al that murdering and church burning and why and what happened next. A pretty deep almost academic book.
It's excellent , even if you are a metal layperson which i am.

Jim Daze
22-10-2004, 11:28 AM
Just read that book about Dennis Brown by Penny Reel, really good with some amazing photos of old reggae clubs in Hackney and Stoke Newington, The Four Aces etc (anyone else used to go to Club Labyrinth). Reccomend this book.

satanmcnugget
22-10-2004, 09:34 PM
a book about Dennis Brown??????????? oh man!!!!!! ty Simon!!!!!! Dennis Brown is like a GOD to me!!!!! i HAVE to track that down!!!!!!

francesco
24-10-2004, 10:40 AM
recently read Lords of chaos about norwegian black metallers and their ideas and practices, basically an investigation of al that murdering and church burning and why and what happened next. A pretty deep almost academic book.
It's excellent , even if you are a metal layperson which i am.


Nice book about nice people... :eek:
too much Burzum interview anyway... and very little about the music, but i recommend it too

Did someone read the book on death metal "Choosing Death"? i wanted to buy it but i want an opinion, for what i know it could be shit...


anyboby has news when the new Simon Reynolds book will get in print? Really waiting for that.


ciao da francesco

grimly fiendish
24-10-2004, 01:02 PM
any recommendations?

i assume you've read words and music, the morley thing? i've just been commenting on that in another thread, oddly. it's a sprawling work of sporadic genius, but if you're not a morley fan (ie if you're not willing to indulge him) then you're gonna hate it ;)

the other one i always recommend to people is ways of hearing by ben thompson. the funny thing is, i can't remember a thing about it. but i know i loved it. his "sunshine on putty", about british comedy, is also well worth a read (although the cover of the new, revised version is fucking terrible. is that meant to be steve coogan at the back?!)

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/0007181329.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

robin
25-10-2004, 09:29 PM
yeah i really liked that ways of hearing book too
that book mentioned on the philip sherburne site looks interesting too

i read a great book about music recently,albeit a partially fictional one
its called coming through slaughter by michael ondaatje
its about buddy bolden,the cornet player from new orleans
the descriptions of new orleans at the start of the 20th century are incredible

anyone else read it?

grimly fiendish
25-10-2004, 10:44 PM
anyone else read it?

no, but you've given me a top idea for my dad's christmas present. cheers!

paul
26-10-2004, 07:35 PM
Although I rarely listen to his stuff these days, the Bob Dylan memoir Chronicles is really good, very well written.

Alan Connor
27-10-2004, 11:51 AM
yeah i really liked that ways of hearing book too

My <i>Ways Of Hearing</i> ended up covered in circles of red pencil, transferred to paper in my pocket and then into puchases for the next few years. There's not a much bigger tribute I can make to a book, apart from the fact that it's a good, funny read.

I still prefer the previous one, <i>Seven Years Of Plenty</i>, though. Rounded up some of the tracks I never found when I first had broadband access this year. It's a really wonderful book.

I never did find the specific Genaside II tracks I wanted, though.

Is it vulgar to link to one's own site here? If not, I've made a list of great books <i>by</i> musicians <a href="http://www.lnreview.co.uk/music/002606.php">here</a>.

stelfox
27-10-2004, 04:53 PM
recently read Lords of chaos about norwegian black metallers and their ideas and practices, basically an investigation of al that murdering and church burning and why and what happened next. A pretty deep almost academic book.
It's excellent , even if you are a metal layperson which i am.

i strongly recommend that no one else buys this book. michael moynihan, its author, is a cunt: a racist, anti-semitic shitbag who you should really not want to give your money to.

<b>This piece reprinted from searchlight magazine, originally published in 1999</b>

Antihuman - Misanthropy Records

Hadleigh in Suffolk may seem an odd place for Britain's Black Metal inner sanctum, but it is here, in this picturesque English village, that some of the key players reside. Not only is it home to Cradle of Filth, a commercially-minded mainstream Black Metal band, but it is also the base for the secretive Misanthropy Records, a key component of the international National Socialist Black Metal scene. Chris Cayton reports.
Misanthropy Records, launched in 1993, plays a pivotal role in producing and distributing some of the most extreme Black Metal and industrial music in the world. Misanthropy produces a dozen bands through its own labels, as well as acting as distributor for approximately another 50 acts. Its latest catalogue proudly boasts the entire back catalogue of the Norwegian Black Metal band Burzum, as well as CDs from bands as diverse as the Black Metal arsonists Mayhem to the Italian industrialists Ain Soph and Michael Moynihan's Blood Axis. Apart from the distribution of CDs, Misanthropy does a thriving trade in publications, t-shirts, badges and videos.

It is run by a 27-year-old German woman named Tiziana Stupia, who also goes under the name of Diamanda.

Misanthropy was originally created to assist the Norwegian nazi Varg Vikernes, who sings as the one-man band Burzum, in releasing his musical material, as no other record company would entertain this fascist. Vikernes has an unenviable reputation for violent and extremist politics.

In 1994 he was sentenced to 21 years in prison for the murder of the founder of Black Metal, Oystein Aarseth, and for setting fire to historical churches. For these crimes Vikernes was fined a total of 23 million Norwegian Kroner (£1.8 million). Despite this he has continued to be a major influence on the underground Black Metal scene and national socialist politics.

Vikernes has long been associated with Satanism, a label he is keen to dismiss. Asked if he was a Satanist in the Norwegian nazi publication, Fritt Forum, Vikernes replied: "No I have never been a Satanist. I have on the other hand used the term in the meaning as an opponent of all Jewish religions. Christendom, Satanism, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism etc are all foreign religions, which have nothing to do with our race".

Misanthropy has become the main supporter and promoter of Vikernes's political and musical projects and despite his incarceration, it has little difficulty obtaining his work. Its mail order operation sells and promotes the entire Burzum catalogue of music and other merchandise including the notorious Burzum t-shirt and flag, "Support your local Einsatzkommando", which come complete with a death's-head symbol. Much of this seems to be organised by Rainer, the main influence and writer of the Burzum website.

Despite an announcement by Misanthropy that it intends to cease business, it has only recently released the latest Burzum CD, Hlidskjalf.

Misanthropy is not solely a distributor of Black Metal music. Its catalogue contains a wide variety of musical styles. Indeed it has a sub-genre label, Elfenblut, which specialises in what is known as dark ambient music. One thing binds them all. They are all considered extreme forms of music and some of the other bands have similar, if not identical, politics to Vikernes.

Like many distributors of nazi music, Misanthropy claims that it can dissociate itself from the politics and philosophies of the artists. It claims to be upholding free speech and simply to be providing a service to listeners. These claims fall flat, when one realises that its website is linked to some of the most extreme nazi sites across the world, including those of the Heathen Front and the Thulean brotherhood.

Misanthropy's extremist merchandise is not confined to the works of Vikernes. Among other items distributed is material by the American band Blood Axis and Allerseelen, the musical project of the Austrian known as Kadmon

Blood Axis is run by the Oregon-based extremist Michael Moynihan. Moynihan is a well known Satanist and nazi who has been an influence on the Black Metal scene since he wrote Lords of Chaos: the bloody rise of the Satanic Metal Underground. This book was written in conjunction with the former Morgenbladet journalist Didrik Soderlind, who now plies his trade for the Norwegian edition of Playboy magazine.

When Moynihan was asked by the Scottish based fanzine Compulsion whether he considered himself a fascist, he replied: "I will say outright: if fascism will restore some sense of order, discipline and responsibility to the world, then I am all for it".

One Blood Axis CD sold by Misanthropy Records is Blot - Live in Sweden. This album opens with a recording of a speech by the British fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley, which begins "Brother blackshirts, my comrades in struggle. Our fight is for the soul and in that battle we go forward together until victory be won."

Politically, Moynihan courts controversy. His views range from outright fascism and Satanism, to a keen interest in paganism and social Darwinism. He denies being a nazi and has denounced the personality cult around national socialism, believing it too limited. However, when asked in an interview: "If you were given the opportunity to gas blacks and Jews, would you do it?" he replied: "If I were given the opportunity to start the next Holocaust, I would definitely have far more lenient entrance requirements than the Nazis did".

Kadmon, the man behind Allerseelen, also produces pamphlets on his particular form of nazi paganism and ultra nationalism. Included in Allerseelen's written works available from Misanthropy are tracts on Leni Riefenstahl, Vikernes, Nordic religions and the "volkish way". His music includes the single Kaferlied which is a tribute to the nazi and occultist Ernst Junger.

A more secretive figure involved in Misanthropy is Steven O'Malley. Formerly resident in England, O'Malley was deported back to Los Angeles in 1998 after failing to extend his work permit. Despite returning to America, he remains connected to Misanthropy.

Aside from Misanthropy, O'Malley produces and publishes the underground magazine Descent, a glossy and well produced publication for bands on the extreme fringes of music. The links with Misanthropy and those who are around them are obvious. As well as giving credits to Tiziana, O'Malley carries articles from Misanthropy's friends Blood Axis and Allerseelen, alongside advertisements for the Nazi skin band Rahowa from Resistance Records and Burzum.

Despite Misanthropy's extensive mail order and CD operation, readers may be surprised to hear that the company, Misanthropy Records Ltd, has no income. The directors' report attached to its latest financial statements, filed at Companies House, claims that the company has had no income or expenditure. And this seems to have been the case for the past four years. The explanation may be that Misanthropy is also the name of a linked unincorporated business, which would not have to file any accounts.

Misanthropy Records Ltd may claim to be up for sale, but it is likely that it will re-emerge in one form or another. The cynical may think that the timing of the sale is a little too convenient and aimed at deflecting any official interest in its links with Vikernes.

If Misanthropy does re-emerge, there is little doubt that it will continue to promote the nazis who use its services as a badge of convenience.

TOP

Copyright © 1999, Searchlight,

rob_giri
28-10-2004, 04:44 PM
Interesting, i'll remember to keep my hands away from that one. Damn fascists metalheads

Down a slightly calmer avenue, can't go wrong with David Toop's books.

Just read Ocean of Sound. Brilliant read. Scattered all over the place but still incredible. From Sun Ra to Telepathic Fish, to Varese to Ryuichi Sakamoto, from Richard Maxfield to a strange and intriguingly unexplained venture into the Amazon to record the sounds of Shamans in ibena rituals. Funny at times for its unconnected, erratic nature and for Toop's own idiosyncratic sense of humour concerning his ability to tie in stories such as the said mosquito-riddled journey into the general theme of ethereal ambient culture. Well worth a read

Haunted Weather, which i am about to commence, also looks very interesting. Hardly Viking Metal, though :cool:

mms
28-10-2004, 08:06 PM
misanthropy etc is covered in the revised edition of the book, clearly stated it's a nazi publication, as is blood axis records, within context that they released vikernes music, the idea that the writers are nazis doesn't sit tidily with the way the book is written and the criticism/reflections on the artists and their actions, as well as reflections from across the board.

stephen o'malley is a suprise though if there is ny truth in it , being the guy behind sun 0))) and southern lord records, who released among things boris from japan , the probot lp with lemmy, max cavallera (a brazillian) and dave grohl from nirvana, I know he published descent but i didn't think he had ties with misanthropy.

Also the decisions from alot of labels and distributors to not support pro-nazi music , ie vme in finland/sweden is widely discussed. black metal doesn't necessarily equal nazisim afterall.

stelfox
28-10-2004, 08:25 PM
i could link to moynihan's blog; a total cesspool of extreme-right propaganda, social darwinism and outright racism but i really don't want to give him the traffic.

Jay Vee
28-10-2004, 09:54 PM
<I>saw this http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...789455?v=glance on Sherburne's blog...was wondering if anybody here has read it yet? </I>.

Reading "Audio Culture" at the moment and it's an excellent anthology.

satanmcnugget
30-10-2004, 06:46 PM
as soon as i hunt down the book on Dennis Brown, im grabbing that Audio Culture one as well.....provided i can find it anytime soon here in Canaduh ;)

dubversion
01-11-2004, 11:25 PM
i've got groaning shelves full of this stuff.. i'd definitely recommend Tape Delay by Charles Neal, great anthology of interviews with the main players of whatever we're supposed to call the industrial scene these days..

also, This Band Could Be Your Life by Michael Azerrad (sp?) - 20-30 page potted histories of all the brilliant, whining bastard children of america - Dinosaur Jr, Husker Du, Big Black, Butthole Surfers (a laff riot of a story), Minutemen etc...

Bass Culture by Lloyd Bradly is the best book i've read on reggae, Rude Boy by Chris Salewicz the worst.

and Eno's Year With Swollen Appendices is a gem.
"morning - installed new son et lumiere piece at the Geneva Biennialle.
evening - knocked one out over Prussian Fat Babes Monthly".

(not an actual quote ;) )

rob_giri
02-11-2004, 02:25 PM
Anyone read David Keenan's Englands Hidden Reverse? A friend tells me its great, albeit with a slight oversaturation of David Tibet interviews. Apparently gives really great incite into just how fucked up Coil really are.

Speaking of which i had a friend who was in London and got invited to a Coil party, with, of course, the catch that you had to where nothing but shoes and socks. It just aint easy being Sleazy :cool:

dubversion
02-11-2004, 06:32 PM
the Keenan book isn't bad at all, although i did think Tibet was too prominent, at the expense of NWW and Coil...

Loki
03-11-2004, 10:58 AM
Englands Hidden Reverse is a great read, i've returned again and again to it. It focuses very much on the social interralationships in the 'industrial' scene, taking up where the Coum/ TG book left off and branching out to encompass several lost bands of the era.... my only slight complaint is that the music itself isn't really analysed, critically or otherwise... the anecdotes etc are occasionally informative but i think the music of NWW,Coil and C93 is sufficiently dense and symbol-laden to merit a more thorough investigation into the meanings behind it all, whether this be the various literary references (touched upon, especially Tibet's) or the samples/ sound sources used.... as it stands the music is often left alone, to speak for itself, as if the intentionality behind it is irrelevant (i mean, this is hardly pop music and i don't feel it was ever intended to be standalone)...

or maybe this is just an extension of my latent musical geekiness and my dissatisfaction with the unknowable?

jahsonic
03-11-2004, 08:42 PM
[QUOTE=satanmcnugget]saw this http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0826416152/103-8621346-4789455?v=glance on Sherburne's blog...was wondering if anybody here has read it yet?



Things I've read and enjoyed


<p><li><A HREF="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1852427434/metasoul"><i>Ocean of Sound</i> (1995) - David Toop [Amazon.com]</A>
My favourite music book


<p><li><a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0674535812/metasoul">Lipstick Traces, a Secret History of 20th Century (1989) - Greil Marcus [Amazon.com]</a>
music and politics

<p><li> <A HREF="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0802136885/metasoul"><i>Last Night a DJ saved My Life</i> [Amazon.com]</A>
dj and dance culture

<p><li> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0415058759/metasoul">Cut 'N' Mix: Culture, Identity, and Caribbean Music - Dick Hebdige [Amazon.com]</a>
black music, versioning

Thanks woebot and k-punk, for the forum
Wish you the best of luck

Jan

labrat
04-11-2004, 10:48 AM
when i read cut & mix (yonks ago) i remember being most amused that dick thought that the future of sounsystem culture lay in British rap (he bigs up Smiley culture)
oh how i laughed

cant bring myself to mention the G word here.(wot a fool i wuz)

Ocean of Sound is one of my fave books on music, the fragmented,digressive nature of the text is a perfect foil for the music he's talking about.

has anyone mentioned More Brilliant Than The Sun yet .....
again the text 's stylings amplifiy the music (especially the stuff on Drexciya)

john eden
04-11-2004, 11:50 AM
as soon as i hunt down the book on Dennis Brown, im grabbing that Audio Culture one as well.....provided i can find it anytime soon here in Canaduh ;)

Mr Nugget, the Dennis Brown book has pretty bad distribution - I reckon you'll like it though. Try the reggae stores online like Ernie B or Dubvendor... if you don't get any luck I can try and sort you ahhhht.

john eden
04-11-2004, 11:52 AM
the Keenan book isn't bad at all, although i did think Tibet was too prominent, at the expense of NWW and Coil...

Yep, and thanks for the lend. :)

It's ambitious, and I was more interested in the "scene" and the ideas than the music anyway. Recommended but it's really expensive for someone with a casual interest (and for me, who used to be obsessive, but is now obsessed with other things!)

francesco
06-11-2004, 08:49 PM
I remember reading that a paperback version of England Hidden Reverse (without the cd) was annunced for the future and sure will be less expensive.

All the great book about music that i have read (the Reynols, Toop, Eshun, Morley, Moynihan, Bangs etc.) have been cited in this tread, what about a good (not great, simply good) book about atrocious music? Read "the music is all that matter" by Paul Stump about English Progressive Rock (Genesis, Yes, Pink Floyd, etc.). Progressive Rock lovers hated it!!! I think it still the only book on Prog that try a little of analisys (a little, not too much unfortunately) instead that uncritical unashamed fan(prog)boy praise.

francesco

matt b
10-11-2004, 09:52 AM
the auditory culture reader http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1859736181/102-4015620-5582538?v=glance

some really nice pieces in this (although some drop into pomo drivel)- sound maps and church bells, isolation of sound (eg: through car journeys/walkmans etc) and a section (which is why i bought it) on soundsystems, which unfortunately isn't that good. it makes you realise how interesting and readable jacques attali is.


norman c. stolzoff 'wake the town and tell the people: dancehall culture in jamaica'
'academic' (written for phd) study of the development of soundsystems from days of slavery up to mid 1990s. really good section on politics of dubplates and hierarchy of artists.

beth lesser 'king jammy'

classic look at dancehall at dawn of digital era. wicked photos (although the effects piss me off) if you like 'sleng teng', beg borrow or steal...


steve blush 'american hardcore: a tribal history'

brutal, raw and opinionated (like the music) telling of h/c in early 1980s, with many interviews w/participants (bad brains, mackaye, mike watt, danzig, harvey cromag etc) quite funny actually- the author thinks hardcore died in the mid-80s and everything post that is basically 'art fag' music.


mark andersen & mark jenkins 'dance of days : two decades of punk in the nation's capital'

couldn't be more different from the above- a much softer, more liberal approach to h/c (one of the authors was/is in positive force), focussing on the DC scene- really good on rites of spring/embrace. sums up the difference between the 'intellectual' and 'street fighting' ends of h/c. could do with uk versions of these last two books.

satanmcnugget
10-11-2004, 06:53 PM
fantastic! i have a lot of hunting to do :)

John Eden, thanks for your wonderful offer! i will try to track it down here first, but i just may take u up on it soon enough :)

gejonte
11-11-2004, 01:24 AM
Yes it was a bit pricey,but also very beautiful.
Lot of gossip about the Industrial scene in England.
Very informative and personal reading about Coil,NWW and C93.
Well done.I give it a 4,5 out of 5
Gejonte

DavidD
15-11-2004, 05:26 PM
This thread is excellent, I should have checked it earlier...anyway I'm wondering, does anyone know some key books that changed how writers approach music? Sort of like what Simon Reynolds talks about in Generation Ecstasy (er...Energy Flash) about how popular music tends to drive "progress" in music and self-styled "progressive" music is generally left to follow it from behind, building from what "The Kids" already created, that sort of thing? Looking at music from a bottom-up populist historical perspective rather than from the Big Important Artists/Auteurs-style histories (a la Ken Burns "JAZZ" series), too.

Also I want to emphasize how great "Love Saves the Day" is, easily one of the best music histories I've ever read.

francesco
02-01-2005, 02:07 AM
Just ordered (on a very famous Internet Book/CD store) this:

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/0571215696.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg


so that's great news, also it's HUGE, 752 pages!!!; the not so great news you have to wait until end of April to get a copy!

thanks Simon!!!

Diggedy Derek
02-01-2005, 03:18 PM
Terrific cover.

blissblogger
02-01-2005, 07:07 PM
it's actually about 560 pages!!!

i wonder where they got that figure from?

at one point it was going to have a long discography of the obvious canonical stuff, just the list of the album and singles alone took up a huge amount of space, and then a second discography on the more esoteric stuff, with commentary, which turned out really vast -- over 20 thousand words. but in the end we had to pull both the discogs to save space.

so praps the the 752 pages was based on that

incidentally the discogs are going to be on available on the Faber website.

big up Francesco and all pre-order cru

mms
02-01-2005, 07:15 PM
really looking forward to this book.
hopefully it will mean more re-issues and people rethinking music too.

Tweak Head
08-01-2005, 06:55 PM
"Revolution in the Head: The Beatles' Records and the Sixties" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0712666974/qid=1105213716/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_11_1/202-3062049-6497424 ) by Ian MacDonald. Awesome book ... just lock yourself away with it and a pile of Beatles CD's.

"Head On/Repossessed" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0007197756/qid=1105213943/sr=2-3/ref=sr_2_3_3/202-3062049-6497424) by Julian Cope - his autobiography. The first volume, especially, is priceless.

And while we're on Saint Julian, check out Krautrocksampler ... even if you don't like Krautrock the breathless descriptions will have you rushing out to buy those Amon Duul records.

Tweak Head
09-01-2005, 10:58 AM
Oh, and another one: What Jazz Is (http://http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0802713289/qid=1105271818/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_8_3/202-3062049-6497424) by Jonny King. A great introduction ... nnnice!

egg
10-01-2005, 10:49 PM
The Creation Records Story: My Magpie Eyes are Hungry for the Prize - David Cavanagh - Virgin. Enjoyed this - also good long read (750 pages ish)

arcaNa
11-01-2005, 09:13 AM
I remember reading that a paperback version of England Hidden Reverse (without the cd) was annunced for the future and sure will be less expensive.

...does anyone know if this is released yet? -amazon says "yes",but then mailed me and said it was unavailable...?! :(

i don't have much to add, all the good ones have already been mentioned (naturally!)- toop, eshun, reynolds, etc. etc...(i actually got my marks adjusted down from A to B on one oral exam where i had just read Toop's "Ocean Of Sound",and was so impressed with the range of connections this has sparked in my mind that i started answering the questions in similarly "impressionistic",pointillist fashion- and started tieing together totally unrelated happenings to a,um,pretty "obscure"/far-out conclusion!- they just told me: "well, this is all brilliant, my dear...but i'm afraid you're just too advanced for us...we don't understand what the fark you're on about!"... :eek: :D -brilliant book,anyway...it made me reconsider the way i thought about music and music descibed as sound....an eye-opening read!

jenks
11-01-2005, 10:40 AM
Agree entirely about toop - the two cds that go with that book - ocean of sound and crooning on venus- have kept me busy for years, chasing up various artists and having a profound influence on what/ how i listen.
i even did the eno thing where i made a tape of the street noise and then listened to it as if it were music, waiting for the changes etc. fascinating.
also went to hear toop read from exotica in that trendy cinema in hoxton, now closed, name escapes me. again brilliantly associative,; great fan of conrad too.
finally i notice he is writing in this month's tate magazine about sound sculpture - following on from nauman in the tate. i thought the exhibition toop curated in the hayward on sound stuff was one of the most stimulating things i have seen/ heard in a london gallery for years.

mistersloane
20-02-2012, 10:35 PM
I just read Gimme Something Better,
http://gimmesomethingbetter.com/
History of bay area punk.
Best book on punk I've ever read. I was crying with laughter. The dead dog story is genius.
Nicest thing about it - true to form - is its inclusion of loads of people from the scene, not just the bands. Makes it so much better. Cant recommend it enough.

slim jenkins
23-02-2012, 07:30 AM
Note: if you're looking for a thoroughly comprehensive, authoritative analysis of Jazz, with concise explanations of the technical aspects regarding improvisation and composition as well as a social history of black America...er...don't read this book.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=points%20of%20departure%20robin%20tomens&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCUQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.co.uk%2FPoints-Departure-Essays-Modern-Jazz%2Fdp%2F1900152797&ei=aPdFT4-SE6ed0AXX3fiiDg&usg=AFQjCNFhx8-qJ1wKmAZUmsseMM5hxR81ng&sig2=wcUTRNPZKsG9J7dJriuxWg

;)

blacktulip
23-02-2012, 08:06 AM
Shakey is a cool book.

blacktulip
23-02-2012, 08:07 PM
From the above:


Young’s superstar buddies were especially spooked. “Crosby and Nash, they couldn’t handle it,” said Hinds. “It was too grungy for them.” David Crosby, usually the high priest of any scene, left Rusty Kershaw particularly unimpressed. “Kershaw just fuckin’ laughed at him,” said Hinds. “He’d get on the floor and start howlin’.” At some point, Stills also had a run-in with Kershaw. “Me and Neil were playin’, and it was such heavy magic, I think Stills thought if he picked up the guitar, he’d have it. Man, you don’t take a guitar from somebody’s hand, and it just pissed me off.” Kershaw pulled a knife on him in response. “I said, ‘Stephen Stills, who in the fuck is that? You better git back, you motherfucker.’ Neil was sayin’, ‘Go ahead—do it! Do it!’” Young doesn’t recall the incident.

rubberdingyrapids
10-12-2012, 10:50 PM
i dont want to read a book about music as such, but one about fans, doesnt have to be about music though i imagine music fans are/were the most fanatical of all. can anyone recommend any books like this?

CrowleyHead
09-01-2013, 04:54 PM
i dont want to read a book about music as such, but one about fans, doesnt have to be about music though i imagine music fans are/were the most fanatical of all. can anyone recommend any books like this?

Ever read John Darnielle's 33 1/3 of Black Sabbath's "Master Of Reality"? It's from the fantasy perspective of a kid who gets locked up in a mental ward by his parents, writing in a journal about his life, and how much he loves that album. Etc. etc.

There are other books in that range, but never specifically about THE FANS, but there are subsections about fans.

mistersloane
10-01-2013, 12:25 AM
i dont want to read a book about music as such, but one about fans, doesnt have to be about music though i imagine music fans are/were the most fanatical of all. can anyone recommend any books like this?

You have to read Bye Bye Baby, about being a Bay City Rollers fan, it's really brilliant.

http://www.amazon.com/Bye-Baby-City-Rollers/dp/0747545405

I'm not saying that ironically.

droid
10-01-2013, 09:38 AM
Anyone who hasn't read Miles Davis' autobiography should drop everything and get it right now.

Bowie in Berlin is pretty good. Read a good Iggy Pop bio a few years back: http://www.amazon.com/Iggy-Pop-Open-Up-Bleed/dp/0767923200 and read 'the act you've known for all these years' just before xmas - full of minutiae, but otherwise a pretty dull exploration of the context and legacy of Sgt. Peppers.

john eden
10-01-2013, 11:56 AM
i dont want to read a book about music as such, but one about fans, doesnt have to be about music though i imagine music fans are/were the most fanatical of all. can anyone recommend any books like this?

Fred Vermorel is your man - Fandemonium and Starlust.

Starlust is a compilation of intense fan letters/diaries. Very sexual in places. Quite demented in others. I don't have Fandemonium, but saw a great TV documentary based on it.

john eden
10-01-2013, 12:03 PM
Oh yeah and "Englands Hidden Reverse" new edition coming out on Strange Attractor in 2013.

http://strangeattractor.co.uk/further/forthcoming-titles-from-sap/

Best book I read on music in 2012 was "As Serious As Your Life" by Val Wilmer.

crackerjack
11-01-2013, 07:27 AM
i dont want to read a book about music as such, but one about fans, doesnt have to be about music though i imagine music fans are/were the most fanatical of all. can anyone recommend any books like this?

Second shout for Starlust.

empty mirror
11-01-2013, 10:58 AM
Anyone who hasn't read Miles Davis' autobiography should drop everything and get it right now.

Bowie in Berlin is pretty good. Read a good Iggy Pop bio a few years back: http://www.amazon.com/Iggy-Pop-Open-Up-Bleed/dp/0767923200 and read 'the act you've known for all these years' just before xmas - full of minutiae, but otherwise a pretty dull exploration of the context and legacy of Sgt. Peppers.

I didn't realize Miles wrote an autobiography. I will read that as soon as I can.

I've got that Iggy Pop "Open Up and Bleed" book but haven't got around to it. I know the author from a forum I moderate - he's a red hot poker of knowledge about certain topics. He was in a really good Factory band, Nyam Nyam.

I just picked up The Beautiful Music All Around Us but haven't cracked it open yet. There was an NPR bit that brought it to my attention.

I have been leafing through Crumb's illustrations of bluesmen, jazz cats, and early country shit-kickers. Really enjoying that. Comes with a CD, which is cool.


Also, on a personal note, the first time I spoke to my wife was when she rang me up for a book on The Smiths that I was purchasing (All Men Have Secrets). She asked me what my favorite Smiths album was and I totally fucked up, saying "Louder Than Bombs". Ugh, it's Strangeways...

CrowleyHead
11-01-2013, 01:23 PM
Shakey is a cool book.

This. I saw the new Neil book in the store recently, and I tried flipping through it, but I don't know if I can engage...

Currently I'm wading through the book on Factory Records, "Shadowplayers". It's pretty good, also going through Peter Shapiro's "Turn The Beat Around" which is mostly comprised of stuff I already knew from other books, SO FAR. Also have the Black Flag bio "Spray Paint The Walls", again, more of stuff I already learned from other books, but still really useful. Oh, and "Satan Is Real" is just depressing as all hell, but I'm only as far as the childhood, so hey.

crackerjack
12-01-2013, 10:37 AM
This book on the business of hip hop rather than the music itself is just brilliant.

http://www.dancharnas.com/book/

It reads a bit like Easy Tigers/Raging Bulls, lots of overlapping narratives of key, mostly backroom players.

slim jenkins
13-01-2013, 09:09 AM
I didn't realize Miles wrote an autobiography. I will read that as soon as I can.



Ghosted via interviews, as I recall, but worthwhile for the full-on dark prince persona.

Straight Life on Art Pepper is good although I wouldn't expect many here to be into that kind of Art.

Richard Meltzer's A Whore Just Like The Rest is a favourite of mine.

David Byrne's How Music Works is on my TBR list. I'm sure some of you have read it.

Audio Culture edited by Christoph Cox & Daniel Warner is an essential collection.

jenks
13-01-2013, 02:18 PM
How Soon Is Now - Richard King - excellent account of rise and fall (and possible rise again) of British independent record labels. http://www.how-soon.com/index.php/blog/