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View Full Version : Why do people pat the guide dog but edge away from the blind man?



martin
17-05-2007, 03:23 PM
?

swears
17-05-2007, 03:27 PM
Do they?

Mr. Tea
17-05-2007, 03:28 PM
If you were blind, would you want to be patted? :slanted:

Mr. Tea
17-05-2007, 03:29 PM
Also, guide dogs are specially trained over a period of years to be obedient and helpful. Blind people do not undergo any kind of vetting procedure at all, and could possibly bite.

john eden
17-05-2007, 03:45 PM
I think people perhaps feel that they want to talk to the blind person but then have all sorts of doubts about it* and plump for the easiest option.

* like:

"do they want to be talked to?"
"am I just doing this because I feel sorry for them?"
"will I look stupid?"
"what if they hate me?"
"what if they are really lonely and want to be my best friend?"

Mr. Tea
17-05-2007, 04:01 PM
This reminds me of something I saw a while ago on the tube. Sitting opposite me, and next to each other, were a blind man and a young guy of about 20. The young bloke was trying to engage the blind guy in conversation, genuinely trying to be friendly and helpful, asking if he wanted to be told when we'd reached his stop, that sort of thing. The blind guy could obviously manage perfectly well by himself and I got the impression he was maybe getting a bit annoyed by the other bloke's attention.
Then the the blind guy got up and left the train and who should sit down in his place but an albino. Fortunately the talkative young fellow managed to hold his tongue. I had this little fantasy about a dwarf with three arms or something getting on at the next stop, and the poor lad sitting there getting more and more freaked out...

PeteUM
17-05-2007, 05:59 PM
My mate, a nervous, awkward youth, was patting a guide dog on a train once. Suddenly its owner realized he was at his stop and hurriedly rose to exit the train, whereupon my mate got caught up somehow in the dog's straps. Rather than try and communicate his predicament, he allowed himself to be carried along with them whilst feverishly attempting to extricate himself. I wasn't there, but I have it good authority that it was almost Cleese-esque.

Mr. Tea
17-05-2007, 06:05 PM
it was almost Cleese-esque.

Sounds more like something that would happen to Mr. Bean.

Freakaholic
17-05-2007, 06:32 PM
I routinely find myself acknowledging dogs, but ignoring the person they are walking.

I dont think it has much to do with blindness, its just dogs are a lot easier to relate to. prolly cuz they dont talk back.

Lichen
17-05-2007, 08:55 PM
I helped a blind woman cross the road today.

I was rather pleased with my matter of fact approach to the situation.

Me, almost blithely: "Would you like an arm?"

She :cool: , quite matter of fact:"Yes please"

Job done.

bruno
18-05-2007, 05:09 AM
that's the spirit!

Sick Boy
03-08-2007, 04:04 PM
Sounds more like something that would happen to Mr. Bean.

Remember the one where Mr. Bean is at the beach and he wants to change into his swimming gear but there is a blind man next to him and he gets really uncomfortable because he isn't sure that he is blind and tries to change by putting his trunks over his trousers and then taking his trousers off through his trunks?

Legend.

simon silverdollar
07-08-2007, 03:47 PM
i once tried to help a blind man across the road and he went completely mental at me. i made the mistake of tapping him (gently, in a friendly manner) on the arm while asking him if he'd like a hand, and he started screaming 'don't touch me ! don't touch me!'

i don't think him being blind had anything to do with it- he was just crazy. but that was enough to push me back to my typical middle class english habit of zero interaction with strangers, and hoping to just merge into the background, unnoticed, not impinging on anyone else and hoping that no one will impinge on me. i'm sure alan bennett would have something to say about it- don't be such a twat, probably.

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 03:55 PM
i once tried to help a blind man across the road and he went completely mental at me. i made the mistake of tapping him (gently, in a friendly manner) on the arm while asking him if he'd like a hand, and he started screaming 'don't touch me ! don't touch me!'


You should have pretended to be deaf and started moaning back at him incomprehensibly. Could have been a right laugh...

bruno
07-08-2007, 04:02 PM
the exact same thing happened to me with a little old lady i offered to help off the bus, she went from sweet and frail to foaming mad, shrieking 'don't touch me' at the top of her lungs. she then inched her way down as slowly as possible, going into fits at the slightest contact with anyone. clearly off her rocker.

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 04:18 PM
I guess you could say she was a little 'touched'...

bruno
07-08-2007, 04:21 PM
indeed :)

Lichen
07-08-2007, 05:57 PM
Incredible synchronisity: I saw a wheelchaired woman on the street an hour ago.

She had a pushing wheelchair as opposed to one you wheel yourself. But she had no psuher and was sort of clawing her way along the pavement with her elderly feet.

She got a curb, which curbed her ability to move completely. So I offered her a push. She accepted and we trundled off. I had a job to finish at work and time was ticking but I was faced with difficult dilemma: how could I break off from pushing and leave the woman stranded again?

I asked her where she lived and she waved towards the middle distance (we're on Westbourne Grove, now, having started halfway down the Bayswater Rd). I trudged on for another 1/4 mile or so (as far as the middle distance), wished the lady luck and dashed back to the office. I looked over my shoulder after a moment or two, and she hadn't moved. She might still be there now.

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 06:01 PM
I looked over my shoulder after a moment or two, and she hadn't moved. She might still be there now.


And I bet some poor carer is absolutely SHITTING themselves right now, wondering where the hell old Doris could have got to, she can't move around on her own, I only left here for two minutes... ;)

nomadologist
07-08-2007, 06:04 PM
there's a guy with no legs who comes on the 6 downtown during rush hour most nights who walks by using his arms sort of like one would crutches, swinging his body along. i usually give him money, he's a very pleasant guy for being so debilitated.

the burn victim guy who comes on to the subway with a sandwich board on asking for money is really scary, i'll admit that it's very hard for me to look at him.

Noah Baby Food
07-08-2007, 06:08 PM
The answer to this questions is, blind people are freaks and people are scared that by touching them, they may catch blindness themselves! MASSIVE "LOL"

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 06:10 PM
The answer to this questions is, blind people are freaks and people are scared that by touching them, they may catch blindness themselves! MASSIVE "LOL"

Is that like those little red ribbons people with AIDS have to wear so you know to shun them to avoid catching it?

Noah Baby Food
07-08-2007, 06:19 PM
For some reason this reminds me of a girl at my school. She was a mouthy so-and-so who loved a bit of trouble, and made great weight out of the fact she had a dead mum. But it seemed like whatever you made a gag about, e.g. cancer, road accident, some kind of disaster, she'd kick off and go "SHUT UP MY MUM DIED OF THAT!". Like her mum had died in every possible way.

Lichen
07-08-2007, 06:19 PM
And I bet some poor carer is absolutely SHITTING themselves right now, wondering where the hell old Doris could have got to, she can't move around on her own, I only left here for two minutes... ;)

FUCK!:eek:

nomadologist
07-08-2007, 06:40 PM
Is that like those little red ribbons people with AIDS have to wear so you know to shun them to avoid catching it?

the hivv is for real don't step to me with that shit!

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 06:54 PM
the hivv is for real don't step to me with that shit!

Ummm....what?

nomadologist
07-08-2007, 06:57 PM
that's how we say "i really don't want to get AIDS" in bushwick

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 06:59 PM
that's how we say "i really don't want to get AIDS" in bushwick

I'd rather not get it anywhere. ROFL!!!

swears
07-08-2007, 07:06 PM
Don't worry, there hasn't been anything in the media about AIDS for ages, so they must have cured it or something.

nomadologist
07-08-2007, 07:08 PM
No way, they recruit in my neighborhood for people with the HIV to run studies on them.

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 07:11 PM
I bet New Yorkers have the hardest, most virulent HIV in the world. It's loads better than the HIV you get in London, apparently.

nomadologist
07-08-2007, 07:12 PM
no I think that's in Thailand among the meth shooting prostitutes

i'm serious though, they have billboards up everywhere in brooklyn asking if you want to volunteer for AIDS research

Mr. Tea
07-08-2007, 07:16 PM
An Irishman is stopped in the street by a charity worker with a clipboard:
"Excuse me sir, could you spare five minutes for cancer research?"
"Ahh, I'd be glad to - but to be honest, I can't see us getting much done!"