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Thread: Pointless but it makes me go: "Wow, didn't know that."

  1. #136
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    I heard about this the other day and it blew my mind.

    You know how lichens are a symbiotic organism made up of a fungus and an alga, right? Actually it turns out many - perhaps most - of them are a community of an alga, a filamentous fungus (which has been known about since the 19th century) and another fungus that exists as a unicellular yeast. It's this second fungus that's the new discovery. And just to make it even more interesting, the two fungi are from completely separate phyla that diverged hundreds of millions of years ago.

    http://www.popsci.com/new-research-f...anism-marriage
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  2. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    You know how lichens are a symbiotic organism made up of a fungus and an alga, right?
    yeah, of course. i mean, really, who doesn't know that, c'mon tea.

  3. #138
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    It's general knowledge!
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  4. #139
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    delroy edwards' real name is brendon perlman, and he's the son of actor ron perlman (hellboy, sons of anarchy, many others).

    https://www.residentadvisor.net/features/2664
    Last edited by Leo; 28-09-2016 at 07:33 PM.

  5. #140
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    A nice trick to counteract your confirmation bias:

    "The motivational instructions told participants to be "as objective and unbiased as possible", to consider themselves "as a judge or juror asked to weigh all of the evidence in a fair and impartial manner". The alternative, cognition-focused, instructions were silent on the desired outcome of the participants’ consideration, instead focusing only on the strategy to employ: "Ask yourself at each step whether you would have made the same high or low evaluations had exactly the same study produced results on the other side of the issue." So, for example, if presented with a piece of research that suggested the death penalty lowered murder rates, the participants were asked to analyse the study's methodology and imagine the results pointed the opposite way.
    They called this the "consider the opposite" strategy, and the results were striking. Instructed to be fair and impartial, participants showed the exact same biases when weighing the evidence as in the original experiment. Pro-death penalty participants thought the evidence supported the death penalty. Anti-death penalty participants thought it supported abolition. Wanting to make unbiased decisions wasn't enough. The "consider the opposite" participants, on the other hand, completely overcame the biased assimilation effect – they weren't driven to rate the studies which agreed with their preconceptions as better than the ones that disagreed, and didn't become more extreme in their views regardless of which evidence they read."

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017...son?ocid=fbfut

  6. #141
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    The Rock ’n’ Roll Casualty Who Became a War Hero

    I asked if he ever talked about it. Jason shook his head no. Did they find out anyway? “Always.”

    The first time was at Fort Benning in 1994, in the middle of the hell of basic training. The ex-cop recruits in boot camp with him said that prisoners had more freedom than they did. There were guys who faked suicide attempts to get out of basic. But Everman never had any doubts. “I was 100 percent,” he told me. “If I wasn’t, there was no way I’d get through it.”

    He had three drill sergeants, two of whom were sadists. Thank God it was the easygoing one who saw it. He was reading a magazine, when he slowly looked up and stared at Everman. Then the sergeant walked over, pointing to a page in the magazine. “Is this you?” It was a photo of the biggest band in the world, Nirvana. Kurt Cobain had just killed himself, and this was a story about his suicide. Next to Cobain was the band’s onetime second guitarist. A guy with long, strawberry blond curls. “Is this you?”

    Everman exhaled. “Yes, Drill Sergeant.”

    And that was only half of it. Jason Everman has the unique distinction of being the guy who was kicked out of Nirvana and Soundgarden, two rock bands that would sell roughly 100 million records combined. At 26, he wasn’t just Pete Best, the guy the Beatles left behind. He was Pete Best twice.

    Then again, he wasn’t remotely. What Everman did afterward put him far outside the category of rock’n’roll footnote. He became an elite member of the U.S. Army Special Forces, one of those bearded guys riding around on horseback in Afghanistan fighting the Taliban.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/02/ma...rmans-war.html

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  8. #142
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    The chicken crossing the road is not a non-sequitur but a pun. To get to the 'other side' meaning the afterlife.

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  10. #143
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    Not sure about that. Recently learned it originated in minstrel performances from the mid 1800's, presumably long before crossing a rural road was a dangerous activity.

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  12. #144
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  13. #145
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    What were you doing learning about that joke?

  14. #146
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    Well, if you really want to know...

    Some friends of mine do a radio show and I was listening to it the other day and heard a tune by Pigmeat Markham called 'Here Comes The Judge' with a lovely break at the start.

    https://www.mixcloud.com/nowyoureswi...in-episode-22/

    So I thought 'I have to nab that break', and went searching. Couldnt find the break, but did discover that Pigmeat is claimed by some to be the originator of hip hop.

    http://www.xxlmag.com/news/2011/04/d...-hip-hop-song/

    Well that's an interesting theory, what else did this guy get up to? Turns out he was a minstrel and performed in blackface for most of his career. Found a reference to his autobiography, and whilst trying to find an ebook of that I found this article.

    http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2010/1...t-markham.html

    Which contained a reference to the blackface origins of the chicken joke.


    All of which turned out to be perfect timing for a pedantic Dissensus debunking!

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  16. #147
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    TIL black music hall performers used to perform in blackface. That is astonishing.
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  17. #148
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    trevor horn and writing partners originally wrote "slave to the rhythm" for frankie goes to hollywood, it was supposed to be their follow up single to "relax" but he later decided to give it instead to grace jones. apparently, FGTH even recorded a demo of the track (mostly instrumental and more rock sounding) which at one point was slated to be on the reissue of "welcome to the pleasure dome", but the only recording they could fine was a low-fi version on a cassette.


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