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Thread: "Another Green World" - Eno documentary on BBC4's Arena

  1. #1
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    Default "Another Green World" - Eno documentary on BBC4's Arena

    Anyone else enjoy this?

    If you did not see it, you got another week.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode...r_Green_World/

    Thoroughly liked it and there was a quote in almost every reply from Eno (and big up for including
    15 seconds of "My Sex"/Ultravox).

    He keeps it all together by good storage, good labeling, loads of space, taking notes and drawing in small notebooks
    (although almost never referring to them - Van Gogh's letters-> Eno's notebooks?).
    And I got the impression he's producing U2 and Coldplay
    cause he actually wants to reach people, he wants results.
    Last edited by Ness Rowlah; 23-01-2010 at 11:45 PM.
    Ness Rowlah

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ness Rowlah View Post
    Anyone else enjoy this?

    If you did not see it, you got another week.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode...r_Green_World/

    Thoroughly liked it and there was a quote in almost every reply from Eno (and big up for including
    15 seconds of "My Sex"/Ultravox).

    He keeps it all together by good storage, good labeling, loads of space, taking notes and drawing in small notebooks
    (although almost never referring to them - Van Gogh's letters-> Eno's notebooks?).
    And I got the impression he's producing U2 and Coldplay
    cause he actually wants to reach people, he wants results.

    looking forward to this, thanks for bringing it to my attention.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ness Rowlah View Post
    And I got the impression he's producing U2 and Coldplay
    cause he actually wants to reach people, he wants results.
    Not because he's gone mental?

    This may result in an instant ban, but I kind of have a soft spot for some of his production work with U2.

    Will def watch the programme- thanks for the heads up.

  4. #4
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    Watched it and enjoyed it. I do like him but he does seem a bit self-satisfied, a bit of a bellend. All that stuff about nobody else doing light installations haha.

    Much of his chat is spot on though.

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    Default Referentiality and Outdated Modernism

    Eno said
    "In my house in Oxfordshire, we have this big, beautiful Andrew Logan sculpture of a lovely Pegasus with blue glass wings. When I get a taxi from the station, a driver will always comment on it because it is so striking. What they often say is, 'What does that stand for then?' Or, 'What does that mean?', based on the idea that something exists because it has to tell you something, or it refers to something else, and I realise that this notion is foreign to me. The earliest paintings I loved were always the most non-referential paintings you can imagine, by painters such as Mondrian. I was thrilled by them because they didn't refer to anything else. They stood alone and they were just charged magic objects that did not get their strength from being connected to anything else."
    this struck me as interesting... because it seems obvious to me that it is impossible to make anything non referential; and this non-referentiality, uniqueness and originality is pure illusion and a particularly modernist conceit.

    a (late period) Mondrian is referential of Pythagoras, of Euclid, of ancient architecture, of classical painterly compositions, of modern city streets.

    in fact, it can be convincingly argued that abstraction is more, not less, referential of other objects or systems in the universe, than representation or narrative.

    Alvin Lucier's Music on a Long Thin Wire makes me think of Tibetan singing bowls, Catholic hymns and choir music, Shakuhachi, Buddhism, the tragectory of an object flying through the air, sitting alone by a silent lake at dawn, sunrise on desert planes, staring up at stars at night.

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    Quote Originally Posted by baboon2004 View Post
    Not because he's gone mental?

    This may result in an instant ban, but I kind of have a soft spot for some of his production work with U2.

    Will def watch the programme- thanks for the heads up.
    With Or Without You is a proper lush production, just a shame about Bono's vocal :/

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    I can sort of cope with the idea that Eno is a bit self-satisfied at times. The diary book he wrote, "A Year With Swollen Appendices" is a mixture of thought-provoking and smug on almost every page but he's so good when he's good that I always feel obliged to give him the benefit of the doubt, almost even up to the point of being a champion of the Lib-Dems. However, watching that Paul Morley overview of his career really genuinely made me feel miserable. Watching the Miss Sarajevo concert section swiftly followed by Coldplay just made me ashamed to live in East Anglia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zhao View Post
    in fact, it can be convincingly argued that abstraction is more, not less, referential of other objects or systems in the universe, than representation or narrative.
    Abstract works have wider range of reference due to their abstraction. That's why a still life of a bowl of fruit has a comparatively limited set of references (a bowl of fruit, one school of painting, a contemporary lifestyle). You're saying 'abstraction is more widely and less strictly referential...than representation or narrative', not that abstraction is somehow better at referring. Eno is overdoing it but that's what he's getting at too as far as I can tell.

    Anyway it seems like you're setting up this one as another anti-materialist-carnivorous-westcentrism type thread, there is no need.

    As two big names in geometry Pythagoras and Euclid are going to come up in a lot of paintings.

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    I once got told to 'go home' in Hackney because I was saying everyone was deluded and that Eno was an arse. Talking Heads? Arse. Roxy Music? Arse. Solo work? Arse. Later productions? Don't make me laugh.

    He's a wanker.

    But I was pointed to that documentary by someone who said that it and Eno reminded them of me. So that makes me a wanker too. Aargh.

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    Default Happy 2017 from the Brian

    2016/2017

    The consensus among most of my friends seems to be that 2016 was a
    terrible year, and the beginning of a long decline into something we
    don’t even want to imagine.

    2016 was indeed a pretty rough year, but I wonder if it’s the end - not
    the beginning - of a long decline. Or at least the beginning of the
    end….for I think we’ve been in decline for about 40 years, enduring a
    slow process of de-civilisation, but not really quite noticing it until
    now. I’m reminded of that thing about the frog placed in a pan of slowly
    heating water…

    This decline includes the transition from secure employment to
    precarious employment, the destruction of unions and the shrinkage of
    workers’ rights, zero hour contracts, the dismantling of local
    government, a health service falling apart, an underfunded education
    system ruled by meaningless exam results and league tables, the
    increasingly acceptable stigmatisation of immigrants, knee-jerk
    nationalism, and the concentration of prejudice enabled by social media
    and the internet.

    This process of decivilisation grew out of an ideology which sneered at
    social generosity and championed a sort of righteous selfishness.
    (Thatcher: “Poverty is a personality defect”. Ayn Rand: “Altruism is
    evil”). The emphasis on unrestrained individualism has had two effects:
    the creation of a huge amount of wealth, and the funnelling of it into
    fewer and fewer hands. Right now the 62 richest people in the world are
    as wealthy as the bottom half of its population combined. The
    Thatcher/Reagan fantasy that all this wealth would ‘trickle down’ and
    enrich everybody else simply hasn’t transpired. In fact the reverse has
    happened: the real wages of most people have been in decline for at
    least two decades, while at the same time their prospects - and the
    prospects for their children - look dimmer and dimmer. No wonder people
    are angry, and turning away from business-as-usual government for
    solutions. When governments pay most attention to whoever has most
    money, the huge wealth inequalities we now see make a mockery of the
    idea of democracy. As George Monbiot said: “The pen may be mightier than
    the sword, but the purse is mightier than the pen”.

    Last year people started waking up to this. A lot of them, in their
    anger, grabbed the nearest Trump-like object and hit the Establishment
    over the head with it. But those were just the most conspicuous,
    media-tasty awakenings. Meanwhile there’s been a quieter but equally
    powerful stirring: people are rethinking what democracy means, what
    society means and what we need to do to make them work again. People are
    thinking hard, and, most importantly, thinking out loud, together. I
    think we underwent a mass disillusionment in 2016, and finally realised
    it’s time to jump out of the saucepan.

    This is the start of something big. It will involve engagement: not just
    tweets and likes and swipes, but thoughtful and creative social and
    political action too. It will involve realising that some things we’ve
    taken for granted - some semblance of truth in reporting, for example -
    can no longer be expected for free. If we want good reporting and good
    analysis, we’ll have to pay for it. That means MONEY: direct financial
    support for the publications and websites struggling to tell the
    non-corporate, non-establishment side of the story. In the same way if
    we want happy and creative children we need to take charge of education,
    not leave it to ideologues and bottom-liners. If we want social
    generosity, then we must pay our taxes and get rid of our tax havens.
    And if we want thoughtful politicians, we should stop supporting merely
    charismatic ones.

    Inequality eats away at the heart of a society, breeding disdain,
    resentment, envy, suspicion, bullying, arrogance and callousness. If we
    want any decent kind of future we have to push away from that, and I
    think we’re starting to.

    There’s so much to do, so many possibilities. 2017 should be a
    surprising year.

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