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Thread: rolling tv thread

  1. #76
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    Dear That Guy,
    I wasn't trying to judge it on clips, certainly. I'll try the first series, it's a sound suggestion.
    I misspoke in saying that I was mystified by the appeal of the Sopranos - I got what it was trying to do, but didn't think it was that clever or emotionally engaging. A good, well-made show for sure, but that's all.

    Not into Victorian novels, so maybe it won't be my thing. Six Feet Under is still my pick for the gold standard of US TV drama - it had its problems but regularly touched genius. Obviously the Wire is a very different kind of show, as you say.
    Last edited by baboon2004; 03-08-2018 at 05:50 PM.

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  3. #77
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    Sopranos was unimpeachable apart from when it dragged a bit in the unwisely extended last season, IMO. It was all about the characters and it did that brilliantly.

    Never watched The Wire.

    Any love for House Of Cards? I like it but apparently Spacey won't be in the next series. Even before his disgrace, though, I wonder if the show's wind had been taken out of its sails by being overtaken by real life.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 06-08-2018 at 02:20 PM.
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  4. #78
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    David Simon is a bit of a twat, too, btw. I follow him on Twitter so I know.

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  6. #79
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    i finally saw twin peaks the return. it started off promisingly, then became interminable (as drawn out as any recent prequel-sequel really), then found some threads of coherence in the last 5-6 episodes. i dont think it needed to be 18 hours, though when it finally ended, i did start to see the rest in a different, slightly more positive light, but im still pretty sure, that despite some good scenes and moments, it was massively padded out, like most modern american dramas. then again, maybe its designed just to upend the modern tv audience's ideas of watching modern 'prestige' tv, which it did, but on the WTF scale of david lynchs older stuff, the WTF factor was kind of middling. its like faded WTF-ery. they should have given him some money to make a film without a connection to a tv series he probably doesnt really care much about anymore.

  7. #80

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    Beyond Alienation

    A minor Made in Chelsea squadron has been dispatched to the shores of Croatia for limpid summer romance, a rather dilapidated and dilatory expedition, the underlying shabbiness of which is somewhat disguised by the soft haze and bleached colours deployed by the post-production team.

    The endless drifting episodes of this social drama since 2011 have produced diminishing and yet oddly rewarding returns: new generations are drafted in to mingle with seasoned veterans, and the newer and younger they are, the less distinguishing features they present: the blondes multiply, get goofier, gently plumier; the venal lads lesser snakes than their forbears, little adders slithering around in the wake of that old Boa Constrictor Spencer Matthews. The big chief in Croatia is Jamie Lang, the village idiot who peddles boiled sweets on the back of his family biscuit fortune. Somehow, the effects of these meaningless, recycling personal schisms and couplings are compounded over time; it becomes richer and more interesting by blank default.

    It is still as gripping as it ever was, as it gets even emptier and even more vague and pointless. That's the logic of the thing: a hollow drift of non-events that simulate the motion of emotions, seem to suggest forward momentum, things happening that you cannot actually recall happening one minute after switching over to the rolling disaster that is the Ten 'O Clock News. The traumas add up to nothing even though they break like atmospheric ruptures in the weird psychic meteorology of these fabricated, yet existing, cliques. The dwarf stars that glide through the show now exist in a pretty strange place, acting out their lives like we all do but in a more extreme way, but without anything extreme (like unemployment or illness) actually happening to any of them. Being on TV is not even a big thing for them, simply another component in their surface self-actualization.

    Sophie "Habbs" Habboo has just ditched perpetual goon Sam Thompson, but it's hard to even determine what effect this had on her if any: it was just a plot point in her summer, which happened to coincide with the filming of the Croatia junket, for which it was scheduled neatly in the first place. This is a complicated way to live. Habbs is self-employed, an entrepreneur; her job is that new thing, the CV staple that is The Social Media Influencer, a role she crafted on the back of a degree in Media, Communications and Cultural Studies, surely a legitimate way to use such a qualification. Her zone of influence is her Instagram account, upon which she reclines in expensive bikinis, skirts and drapes, gripping niche beauty products and fellow Made in Chelsea cast members, and friends. In her friction-less negotiation of tangled layers of reality and fiction -- emotional murmurs at the service of self-presentation/self-fashioning -- she is the latest exemplar of the Made in Chelsea condition that was once given the definitive model by the legendary Oliver Proudlock.

    Proudlock -- HIMSELF! -- perfected the semi-detached exploitation of the reality soap platform, as he was quietly and proudly exploited by it, to pimp his own entrepreneurial ambitions that found their ultimate locus on his multi-platform ego-site, pushing his art and fashion label, and presenting the infamous "What is Proudlock wearing today?" blog that was an unintentionally comic take on the i-D straight up format. This was all achieved with some easy and even admirable aplomb. Proudlock was so self-conscious that he lacked any and all sense of self-awareness, let alone irony. Who can forget the episode when he turned up in a bespoke, skinny three piece tartan suit, personally dictated to his long-suffering tailor; part Helmut Berger in The Damned, part Rupert the Bear. Nobody could match the innovative chutzpah; he was a mere sideman on the show, but distilled its pure essence.

    Maybe there is nothing wrong with this at such innocent, extreme points, like Proudlock. There was no crisis in this, none of the existential angst displayed by Donald Trump in his psychotic Twitter war with the forces of the Mainstream Media, a fight to the death to wrest control of his self-image. Proudlock and Habbs can do this without any internal turbulence whatsoever; they don't even seem to be surprised, let alone confused, by the spectral, multi-layered lives they now lead. They cannot be said to be unreal, even as they shed huge chunks of their identity to whatever notion of reality can be said to be left to navigate. But then, almost everybody does that now, to a greater or lesser extent, outside of war zones or rain forests or remote peasant tundra.

    Made in Chelsea is a long way beyond alienation: Antonioni minus Marx. It began like this in 2011, when things were even less strange and displaced than they are now, although we do not seem to have moved on many mental inches, even though it feels and looks like a new paradigm of unreality. In some ways it is not even that far from the society dynamics, egotistical gymnastics and forced coincidences of Anthony Powell's A Dance to the Music of Time novel cycle, but way more condensed and missing the political and historical context. The principal, invariable mise en scene of Made in Chelsea is the chance meeting by some lovely Edwardian railings on an elegant Chelsea or Pimlico street, in the New London where you would never see a Quentin Crisp parading blind with mascara and dumb with lipstick on those streets anymore*. What a surprise! Fancy meeting you here, of all people at this time is this Megalopolis. Otherwise, events occur in specially selected and advertised eateries, boutiques and bars around town, a hi-gloss/glazy backdrop to engineered encounters, couplings and traumas that spill onto the gossip pages and Daily Mail online and actually overlap with lives conducted in a liminal fashion that are not at all radical or even postmodern as they might have seemed, or even been, in 1982, when this was a future, theoretical fantasy.
    Last edited by craner; 17-08-2018 at 11:53 PM.

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  9. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubberdingyrapids View Post
    i finally saw twin peaks the return. it started off promisingly, then became interminable (as drawn out as any recent prequel-sequel really), then found some threads of coherence in the last 5-6 episodes. i dont think it needed to be 18 hours, though when it finally ended, i did start to see the rest in a different, slightly more positive light, but im still pretty sure, that despite some good scenes and moments, it was massively padded out, like most modern american dramas. then again, maybe its designed just to upend the modern tv audience's ideas of watching modern 'prestige' tv, which it did, but on the WTF scale of david lynchs older stuff, the WTF factor was kind of middling. its like faded WTF-ery. they should have given him some money to make a film without a connection to a tv series he probably doesnt really care much about anymore.
    I've picked it up again after a break of some months. I'm still enjoying it, but it undeniably lacks the punch and gripping what-happens-next?-ness of the original (or at least, the first series and first part of the second series). I've just watched ep8, which I think put a lot of people off, with at least half of it having (so far) nothing to do with the main narrative and being really an exercise is surrealism as much as anything.

    You're right about it harking back to Lynch's older stuff - even in the first episode, I was amazed at how much it reminded me of Eraserhead. Or even, you know, his Playstation ads from years back, lol.

    I'm hoping some of the many disparate plot threads will be wrapped up by the end of the series but I think I know Lynch well enough now to expect many of them to be left dangling.
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  10. #82
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    I've been watching and enjoying Lodge 49 recently. It's about a crippled surfer who finds a ring on a beach and ends up joining a free mason-type fraternal lodge whilst a bunch of other stuff goes on in the background relating to debt, alchemy, property development and various other things. It's an odd show, it just sort of gently unfurls and spreads out whilst the characters take centre stage, the creator's namechecked Pynchon as an influence (hence the '49' in the title) which gives some idea of the general atmosphere.

  11. #83
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    my wife has grown to like "lodge 49" but I gave up, watched the first episode and found it a bit "quirky" a la Wes Anderson.

    deep into season 4 of "better call saul", jimmy getting closer to fully turning the corner into the dark side. still holds up.

    just finished binging all four seasons of "line of duty", decent summer fare. two and three were particularly good.

    "trapped" from iceland is worth checking out.

  12. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo View Post
    my wife has grown to like "lodge 49" but I gave up, watched the first episode and found it a bit "quirky" a la Wes Anderson.
    It is a bit like that, yeah. It doesn't really bother me though, it's not the relentlessly twee 'quirky' that you find in later Anderson (I'm thinking Moonrise Kingdom in particular) and which does annoy me, it's just kind of goofy.

  13. #85
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    do you reckon the x files would be good if you watched it from the start now at this point of the timeline 2018? or would it be terrible? i really dont know. i liked it a lot when it came out but i guess i was about 14.

  14. #86
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    That one about the man sized tapeworm fucked me up as a kid

  15. #87
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    i dont have your crystalline memory. all i can remember are mulder and scully and the conspiracy nut in the trailer. i did love it though.

  16. #88
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    There was a tapeworm right

    But it was man sized

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  18. #89
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    sounds wicked lets watch that one again.

  19. #90
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    I reckon X-Files is well due for a rewatch. Both for laughing at the shonky '90s CGI effects and for genuine unironic entertainment.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

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