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Thread: Lovecraft and atheism

  1. #76
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  2. #77
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    https://www.newstatesman.com/chinese...cixin-triology

    For Western readers, Chinese sci-fi is enticing because it takes what we think know about modern China – the strange combination of ancient history and racing electronic change, the cities that spring up in months, the sheer scale of the country and its vast population – and makes it even bigger. In the opening scenes of Liu Cixin’s The Wandering Earth, engines the size of mountains stop the Earth from spinning, and the planet escapes the solar system while the sun explodes. Western sci-fi begins to look almost parochial next to such massive ideas.

    So China's going through its own HG Wells period. What would a 21st century Chinese Lovecraft be writing about?

    This is a challenge. I now want to to write scifi that will sell 1 billion copies in China.

  3. #78
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    "The Ball Room", "The Tain", "Säcken" - all excellent.

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  5. #79
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    Cixin - now he's problematic.

  6. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    I read the first two last night, will read the other two later. Kind of want to dig out the McKenna book I never finished now.
    1 and 3 are my favourites in that series. I've always said that the peers of Deleuze in the Anglosphere aren't in the academy, they're disreputable types like Mckenna. Swashbucklers, rogues, blarney artists

  7. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by HMGovt View Post
    I was searching for something else on my Kindle and came across China Miéville's introduction to At the Mountains of Madness

    Lovecraft was strongly influenced by Oswald Spengler, according to him.

    .....
    Another vital element in AtMoM that has to be seen in light of HPL's views on race is the fact that the most recent carvings - the crudest and most decadent of all - are not the work of the Elder Things at all, but of their insurgent slaves, the shoggoths, which rose up against and destroyed their masters while imitating their culture.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

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