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Thread: shakespeare

  1. #16
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    ive fallen asleep last couple of times ive seen shakespeare performed. i dont think theres such a thing as a good shakespeare performance. just read them.

  2. #17
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    saw an outdoor performance of midsummer nights dream on a lovely summers day in the lake district, on the grounds of a stately home when i as at school. I was a bit too young to fully appreciate it but i remember being pretty good. Not sure I could be arsed now though.

    I associate shakespeare with being at school and especially 6th form. Othello, Romeo and Juliet, Henry V...once more unto the breach...dog eared arden editions. takes me back. I should really start reading him again, he was the best.

  3. #18
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    I saw a performance of Much Ado About Nothing in the quad at my old college years ago - it was a gorgeous summer day, it was a sort-of date with probably the most beautiful woman I've ever met - nothing (appropriately) ever came of it, but it was still wonderful. Just a student am-dram thing, but it was quite a good production. Also there's a scene where one of the characters is meant to be drunk, and the guy playing it did a really good job of it. It's funny how difficult it is to act drunk convincingly when you're not.

    High school trips to London or Stratford for Shakey performances were always enjoyable. The play (usually) and the trip itself. Good times.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  4. #19
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    thing is, if you haven't read it first, its bloody hard to follow the plot if you go and see a shakespeare play and you will miss out on so many little details. Was tempted to go and see king lear once but i think i'd need to read it first or it'd go over my head

  5. #20
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    king lear at BAM last summer staring derek jacobi was absolutely phenomenal...which doesn't mean i still didn't get a little dozzy after three hours, thank goodness for intermission.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    i dont think theres such a thing as a good shakespeare performance. just read them.
    I disagree with the idea that the only good version is the one you construct in your head. In particular, i think the comedies do come to life off the page and on the stage - I saw the Midsummer Night's Dream that has just finished at the Lyric in Hammersmith and spent most of it laughing - not in that, i know there's a joke coming kind of 'knowing ho ho ho' way but in genuine surprise.

    I think reverence is the death of Shakespeare on the stage and i think the braver you are with the editing the better.

    Obviously do read them but they are not novels instead they are road maps for
    performance. The very best understanding i have ever got of a play is by seeing it well played.

    However, my very worst experiences of Shakespeare have also been in the theatre - I hated Macbeth at The Globe the other year and could have walked away from As You Like it at Stratford if it hadn't been for a very attractive actress playing a very minor role.

    Looking forward to What Country... set of plays (Tempest/12th Night/Comedy of Errors) with same cast at the Roundhouse in June. http://www.worldshakespearefestival....s-is-this.aspx

  7. #22

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    I saw this production and I was surprised by how good it was. I fancied all of the actresses, which helped, but it also avoided all Branagh/Olivier/Brian Blessed bombast or affectation. It was genuinely funny, snappy, lovely to look at; the recital and interaction was contemporary and fresh, which made it easy to follow and as gorgeous as it is on the page and amusing (which it never is on the page). It was a revelation, in fact, like the Peter Brook/Paul Scofield Lear is when you first watch it.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    ive fallen asleep last couple of times ive seen shakespeare performed. i dont think theres such a thing as a good shakespeare performance. just read them.
    I agree with this, actually...

    Or at least, there's no such thing as a PERFECT Shakespeare performance - one actor will nail it and the other will go wildly astray

    e.g. I've DLd an audiobook of The Tempest and Ian McKellen does Prospero well but Ariel is annoying as fuck

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    I agree with this, actually...

    Or at least, there's no such thing as a PERFECT Shakespeare performance - one actor will nail it and the other will go wildly astray

    e.g. I've DLd an audiobook of The Tempest and Ian McKellen does Prospero well but Ariel is annoying as fuck
    I am not so sure about that - I just think that's more a case of getting used to theatre itself - they are more than just the speeches. The RSC and NT do live screenings at cinemas now and I've seen some amazing productions in the last few years - Simon Russell Beale's Lear for example was brilliant and the Julius Caesar with the all black cast - phenomenal.

  10. #25
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    read a little bit of 'twelfth night' on my lunchbreak, very enjoyable

    MARIA
    [Sir Andrew Aguecheek's] a very fool and a prodigal.

    SIR TOBY BELCH
    Fie, that youll say so! He plays o' the viol-de-gamboys, and speaks three or four languages word for word without book, and hath all the good gifts of nature.

    MARIA
    He hath indeed, almost natural, for besides that hes a fool, hes a great quarreler, and but that he hath the gift of a coward to allay the gust he hath in quarreling, tis thought among the prudent he would quickly have the gift of a grave.

  11. #26
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    This line from Sir Toby Belch too

    'What a plague means my niece to take the death of her brother thus? I'm sure care's an enemy to life.'

  12. #27
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    twelfth night if it was dissensus

    OLIVIA - corpsey
    FESTE - Sadmanbarty
    SIR TOBY BELCH - martin
    SIR ANDREW AGUECHEEK - craner
    MALVOLIO - ?

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  14. #29
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    I was being provocative/I've only read about ten pages of the thing

    You're actually the Duke

  15. #30
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    Got stoned last night and read the first few scenes of 'The Taming of the Shrew'.

    As I predicted, I enjoyed it a lot more than I did when I was sober. Probably in part because being stoned puts you in a silly, irreverant mood - and it's a silly, irreverant play.

    I was instantly able (imbued with my new superpowers) to see how in Shakespeare (unlike in, say, Milton) you have all these different SORTS of language colliding - from proley slang to high-falutin classical references. In the opening scene, e.g., Sly is a clear percursor to Falstaff, and speaks in the same unruly, ramshackle, witty prose. Then along comes Lord Snooty to jape him right up, and immediately you're in the world of measured, lofty blank verse - which becomes almost self-parodic when they begin flattering and gulling Sly, to make him believe HE is an aristocrat.

    I marked this as 'the first beautiful lines' - who knows if they're first but they are beautiful:

    'Thy hounds shall make the welkin answer them
    And fetch shrill echoes from the hollow earth.'

    Noticing here, too, already, the imagery of the earth being commanded, ministering to aristocratic command, that you get in the Tempest.

    As in the Tempest, too, the concern with the magical or comical assumption of identities, the mixing up of identities (and - comical staple, this - of the meaning of words), the flaunting of theatricality. It's all there, and in one of his first plays.

    Another thing I re-noticed: how the love-struck lapse into rhyming couplets. This sort of irreverance towards poetry that - I REPEAT - you don't find in Milton or (aside from Byron) the Romantics.
    Last edited by Corpsey; 13-07-2018 at 07:14 PM.

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