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  1. #1
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    Default Remember "journalism"?

    How An Austrian Blogger's Report That Paul Krugman Filed For Bankruptcy Ended Up On Boston.com
    Web News Experts: Bogus Krugman Story Shows Dangers of "Mechanical Aggregation"


    edit: http://mediamatters.org/blog/2013/03...l-krugm/193006

    everyone all the way along the line passes the buck and says "hey, don't blame us, we got it from those other guys" (everyone except for brietbart, of course, which would probably run any liberal-bashing story, true or not).

    politics aside, this a scary path for journalism overall, when news aggregators and content developers can almost instantly get a story on hundreds of "news" sites without any editorial screening, never mind actual fact checking.
    Last edited by Leo; 12-03-2013 at 12:39 PM.

  2. #2

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    I remember journalism. I remember big fuck-off broadsheets and thick, glossy, dynamic, ambitious magazines.

    i.

    I still retain a copy of the (London) Times published on 12th September 2001, and when I go back and look at it now the things that surprise me are 1) the size of it (and remembering how difficult it seemed to be to physically cope with a broadsheet when just a child, which is why it was something only adults did or could do); 2) the amount of closely-packed words, a beautiful, dense, heavy, inky word-count; 3) the volume of stuff worth reading, not simply for historical value.

    ii

    I was flicking through a copy of Vogue, April 1988 Edition, then edited by Elizabeth Tilberis after Wintour had sacked everybody Beatrix Miller hired and then flounced off to America. And among all of the other great things in it I was astonished to discover a tightly-written, deeply-researched, clinically polemical eviseration of the Thatcher administration attack on the NHS (the name of the writer escapes me now, unfortunately). It was not only good (and would struggle to survive uncut even in the Guardian these days); it was unexpected. And that is another thing that we've lost: amazing things in unexpected places. Like, for example, i-D sheltering Kodwo Eshun and Steve Beard for some slender years.

    April, '88 Edition:



    iii

    The Times has a point. Free online content and commentary is murdering journalism. Papers cannot afford to pay photographers or foregn correspondants adequately. If you value journalism as a craft and an art however corrupt and immoral it is (and I very much do) you should be pro-Times Paywall.

    iv

    Who are the editors with any vision or at least guts still in the game? Anna Wintour, Terry Jones, Daniel Johnson, Tina Brown...
    Last edited by craner; 12-03-2013 at 10:55 AM.

  3. #3
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    well said, craner. i sometimes feel old when i think the same things, but then have to stop myself.

    can't believe i forgot to include the link to the krugman article:
    http://mediamatters.org/blog/2013/03...l-krugm/193006
    Last edited by Leo; 12-03-2013 at 12:38 PM.

  4. #4
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    I think the 24 hour news channels are a terrible development aswell. There is no need for everyone to know what is happening all the time. Not only is time filled with endless repetition and mundane chat but in the rush to get stories onto the screen before anyone else, fact checking often goes out of the window.

    Its all so superficial that I wonder if theres much point to it at all, do we really learn anything about the things we see on the news or do they just become a sanitised and fleeting spectacle of the things happening in the world?

    I think the journalism industry needs to recognise the effect that their reporting can have and not keep up the damaging facade of being outside observers only saying what they see. Theres no recognition of the power or influence of the news media within the media itself (which may be obvious but it is still a huge flaw)

    Magazines like private eye are invaluable for their criticism of the news media, but I dont know what can really be done to improve things.

  5. #5

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    I remember journalism. I remember when the Indepenent on Sunday employed arts critics.

  6. #6
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    So Independent fired all their music critics and then got the tea boy (actually an editor) to write an article about reggae - cue much hilarity.

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