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Thread: What sort of music did your parents listen to when you were a kid?

  1. #16
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    My mum has quite an acclectic/weird but definitely uncool taste in music. Lots of soundtracks, Yes, Scritti-Politti, Bod Dylan. But what we (me and my brothers and sisters) got growing up was lots of campy 60s pop complations in the car and lots of vocal jazz.

    My dad was a punk and has a great record collection, but when I was old enough to start getting into music (10-13ish), his midlife crisis had well and truly started and he was mostly into crappy Ibiza dance complaitions, The Roots, and some good stuff like Basement Jaxx, which he took me to see as my first gig!

    He still likes to keep current though and always hits me up for new music:

    The new thing he does is drive around listening to Rinse FM and shazaming tunes he likes.
    Last edited by datwun; 25-06-2013 at 03:32 AM.

  2. #17
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    My parents like some of the more 'tasteful' stuff that I'm into (I think they own a Burial album)

  3. #18

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    The soundtrack to my Legotown Years, courtesy of my mother, mostly consisted of: Sade, Matt Bianco, Alison Moyet's Alf, Chris Rea's On the Beach, the soundtrack to Heartburn, 'You and Me Tonight' by Aurra and 'Night Birds' by Shakatak. My father was a hipster like Luka's so that list would be really boring.

  4. #19

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    My father has an original gatefold copy of Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz which he brought on import when he was still in school.

  5. #20
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    these posts blow my mind. my parents were older when i was born (and i'm probably one of the older dissensians), so i can't imagine having parents who had the slightest interest or clue about music.

    so how did that play out in the natural context of kids rejecting their parents interests and values? did you bond over music? did they share their music, did they encourage your learning about it, and did you appreciate and enjoy at the time? or did you rebel against it (even if you came to appreciate it later in life)?

  6. #21

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    I didn't reject my parent's records, I got totally into Alice Coltrane and Yacht Disco.

  7. #22
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    by total coincidence, i recently came across this:

    http://www.theotherfwordmovie.com/


  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandshell View Post
    Black Sabbath, Beefheart, Zappa, Neil Young, Devo, Hendrix, The Human League, AC/DC, Ry Cooder, Ted Nugent, Fleetwood Mac, Lou Reed, Bowie, Little Feat, The Rolling Stones, Zeppelin, Jethro Tull, Gong, Hawkwind, Kate Bush, Motorhead, Springsteen, Elton John and a bunch of other stuff.
    My dad owns a collection of LPs covering pretty much what you've just listed above. Well, dunno if there was any AC/DC or Nugent, but certainly all the good early Sabbath, Zeppelin, F. Mac, Zappa, Jethro Tull, Cream, Hawkwind, Deep Purple, King Crimson, Floyd, Eno, Alice Cooper, Beach Boys, Roxy Music, Velvets, Canned Heat, plus loads of great old blues stuff...he also had a bunch of cool 7"s left over from when he ran a nightclub in Bristol ca. 1980, some decent soul, reggae, new wave and misc pop.

    BUT, by the time I was around, the record player mainly just gathered dust and my parents were listening mostly to a load of crappy New Age gash, which they're still annoyingly fond of to this day.

    I don't think my mum ever bought any music before she met my dad, which I just find weird, I mean it's not like she doesn't like music.

    I must be in the minority of people who grew up in a white, broadly middle-class British family without any Beatles at all, I mean not even a copied best-of tape. I still don't really 'get' them to this day.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 25-06-2013 at 05:07 PM.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  9. #24
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    My parent were in their late 30s when they had me and I cant remember hearing any music around the house when I grew up really. My dad was a painter and he listened to stuff in his workshop while painting, old blues, jimmy cliff, toots, king tubby, jimi hendrix bob dylan, the rolling stones so I heard a bit of that and soon started listening to my own stuff on his nice hifi. He pretty much stopped listening to new music in about 1980 i think. Remember finding his record collection in the attic and loving all the artwork for the hendrix and floyd albums, I only really liked listening to axis bold as love though. My mum was into standard stuff from her youth, cat stevens, bob dylan, neil young, the beatles.

  10. #25
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    Classical, Frank Zappa, Thelonius Monk, Miles Davis, Simon & Garfunkel, Graceland, Jethro Tull, CSNY pretty much covers it

    My brother played a lot of Motown & Blondie at a fairly young age so I got exposed to that as well.

    This was mid seventies to mid eighties, then both my brother and I got into early electro and breakin...

  11. #26
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    My parents separated, so when I was living with my mom, I was still listening to rap, but I phased out of it temporarily once I hit puberty because it was the Jay-Z, Ja Rule era, and I couldn't be bothered, and so I lately discovered rock. So it was Linkin Park (easy enough crossover for a kid with my weird childhood), which led to a lot of american alternative radio rock, heavy metal, and whatever... I also had a huge fascination for Video Game OSTs and things like that. But when I eventually got into sort of gothy & new wave stuff like The Smiths, Depeche Mode & The Cure in my teens, my mom made fun of me and then revealed her tapes of said bands from before she had me. Basically she gave them up when she was going through the divorce because: "Y'know, I had enough problems, this would've sent me right into the straightjacket."

    My dad struggled with the rock thing, still does to this day. He tolerates certain metal, but if it's not 'musicianship' based, he gets sniffy about it. He also took a while coming around to southern and west-coast rap because he's a New Yorker.

    I never rejected their taste because it basically coincided with mine to a certain degree.

  12. #27
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    My parents have no clue about post-war 'black' music. They could probably identify some big soul tunes and some Bob Marley tracks but that's about it

  13. #28
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    Mum - Elkie Brooks, Paul Simon, Rod Stewart
    Dad - Christy Moore, Wolfe Tones, Pecker Dunne

  14. #29
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    There were hardly any records around the house until I started buying - my folks had about 30-40. The main one I remember being hammered was one of those Pickwick comps where they do shoddy cover versions - in this case of all the rock 'n' roll standards.

    My dad doesn't really like music, though he made an exception for the Beatles - they own Help, Hard Day's Night, Pepper's and Abbey Road. Apart from that, the Alan Price album with Jarrow March on it and a bit of Mozart. Mum likes pre-weird jazz, especially Satchmo, a taste she inherited from her own mother, although she recently amazed me by buying Wailers' Burnin'. That's about it.

    edit: brilliant thread idea. Gonna read the whole thing when I get back in.

  15. #30
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    "the Alan Price album with Jarrow March"
    I just listened to that. A bit different from the sound I associate with Alan Price - love his version of I Put A Spell On You.
    It's a great idea for a thread yeah.

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