Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 71

Thread: Peasant food

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17,087

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slothrop View Post
    Eat what you like. It's just the doublethink between this and, say, the "twee" thread that bothers me.
    But I think there's a crucial difference. No-one here is going to go out of their way to "source" the exact particular ingredients that would have been available to a Catalan shepherd in the 19th century in order to make a certain dish and thereby to bask in the reflected authenticity, rusticity etc. At least, I'd be very surprised if anyone did. I can see why the word 'peasant' in the thread title might rankle, implying as it does a class of poor rural agricultural workers that doesn't really exist in the UK any more (unless you count seasonal Polish fruit pickers or whatever), but all it's about is food that doesn't cost much to buy for, isn't excessively fiddly to prepare and is tasty and filling. I don't see anything wrong with that.

    Anyway, we're getting badly sidetracked, let's get back to recipes.

    One of my all-time favourites is sausage casserole. I like to use English pork sausages (although if you can get them, South African boerwors are the bomb, I think they're generally beef or a beef/pork mixture and they have the same kind of spice blend in them that's used to flavour biltong) along with chorizo for some extra greasiness and the wonderful red colour that comes from the paprika. Start by frying the English sausages whole with the chopped-up chorizo, plus mushrooms, onion and garlic and some chili flakes if you like (not too much, this is meant to taste European, not Mexican). Once the sausages are mostly cooked, add a 1:2 mixture of red wine and beef stock, plus whatever veg you want beyond mushrooms and onions - kale, broccoli, carrots, anything wintery really. If you want to add potatoes (or better still, sweet potatoes), I find it's best to cook them separately then add them towards the end. I guess this breaks the one-pot rule but I find it helps stop the casserole getting too slushy from the starch released by the spuds during boiling.

    Add herbs - bouquet garni, bay leaves and sage are a good bet, plus lots of black pepper, salt if needed (probably not if you're using ready-made stock), a little tomato puree is good too. Then simmer on a low heat until everything is looking suitably casserole-ish, with the brilliant red oil having seeped out of the chorizo and infused the dish. Chopped parsely on top is a nice touch to finish.

    We've done a more Italian version of this with a can of chopped tomatoes and bertolli beans, but if using dried beans be sure to soak them overnight first (we made the mistake of not doing this once, was pretty annoying). Belly pork can be used instead of the sausages.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    146

    Default

    There isnt any peasants in the UK anymore but there are tonnes of poor people. This pretty much necessitates buying cheap food whatever way you cut it, so I don't think that you can say that the contents of this thread are affected. Even if you assume that everyone who posts on here is middle class (doubtful) we all recognise what it's like the last week on the month when you haven't got two pennies to stick together.

    I've recently been making this little number with frozen veg. .Surprisingly tasty

    cabbage
    green beans
    mixed peppers
    spinach
    kidney beans
    garlic
    anchovies (1 tine)
    peanut butter

    serve with rice and a tin of pilchards. Tasty/healthy/cheap and takes about 15 minutes.

    I also like daal

    finely chop onions and fry till brown
    add garlic
    fry cumin/coriander/whatever else
    add chilli powder
    fire in some red split lentils that have been cooked for ten minutes or so
    add ti tomatoes

    again, cheap and quick as. Add frozen veg to bulk up.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    691

    Default

    here is another decent sausage thing to add to the collection:

    take the skin off a sausage or two and make into meatball type guys
    fry with a couple of whole, peeled cloves of garlic
    add some green lentils to the pan (I usually use the big flat sort rather than the French puy kind) along some chunks of parsnip
    add stock and cook until the lentils are done.

    you can also add some kind of herbs if you want to fancy this up, tarragon, parsley, whatever.


    and another sausage classic:

    sausage meatballs, whole grain mustard, cream, pasta.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17,087

    Default

    That sounds wicked apart from the parsnips, which I'm opposed to on an almost ideological level - but I guess sweet potato would probably work in its place? I fucking love sweet potatoes, they're a bit more expensive than regular spuds but still cheap enough for a staple.

    Made the best fucking pie ever today, though I say so myself. Chuck steak, field mushrooms and a whole bottle of this stuff:



    encased in shortcrust pastry. God, it was good.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    THE YABBA
    Posts
    5,816

    Default

    black bean soup / black bean stew / black bean chilli. i can put up recipes if anyone wants em, think I did one in the other thread but that was ages back.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17,087

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mistersloane View Post
    i can put up recipes if anyone wants em
    Yes please Jim! We've got a really great Chinese grocer's near our new place and I want to try out things involving black beans/oyster sauce/chili oil etc. - that laoganma recipe in the other thread sounded pretty badass.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 30-09-2013 at 08:23 AM.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sevilla
    Posts
    3,626

    Default

    puchero andaluz

    half fill large pot with water and throw in

    2 carrots
    2 potatoes
    1 small swede
    1 leek
    2 celery
    3 handfuls of chickpeas (pre-soaked for 12 hours)
    A slice of bacon fat/pork belly
    A white bone
    A whole chicken leg/thigh
    Salt and extra water to taste.
    Some peppermint if you've got it

    bring to boil and keep removing the scum with a ladel for about 15 mins. Put the lid on and cook for about 1.5 hrs or until the chickpeas are ready (45 mins in a pressure cooker).

    you can serve the stock seperately, adding water if needed, with the chickpeas and add noodles or rice. The meat and vegetables left (the pringá) can be served with the stock like a chunky soup or mashed up and turned into croquettes, or with boiled eggs and bread. However you like it.

    absolutely staple food in andalusia

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    THE YABBA
    Posts
    5,816

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Yes please Jim! We've got a really great Chinese grocer's near our new place and I want to try out things involving black beans/oyster sauce/chili oil etc. - that laoganma recipe in the other thread sounded pretty badass.
    This is the South American black beans, not the Chinese ones! I got some Chinese recipes though I can look out. You buy the beans dried in veggie shops or in the Brazilian shops. They're dried like chickpeas or ...beans....lol, not the salted Chinese ones.

    Black beans.

    Place beans in saucepan, add water to cover. With lid on saucepan, bring the beans to a boil over a low heat, let them boil for exactly one minute, then take the pan off the heat to sit, still uncovered, for one hour.

    Then boil for 2 hours, but allow for a longer time. Keep them covered at all times with at least one inch of water. Make sure they really boil. Do not salt until the last half hour of cooking. Add perhaps a bay leaf, some whole cumin seed, half an onion, some black pepper, oregano, garlic.

    Eat with a bit of butter on top and some rice and some corn on the cob (in season now, 4 for a pound!)

    (this is one of those recipes that assumes you've got enough money for gas/leccy to be able to boil them for that long, sorry. I'll try out some other methods that maybe are more cost efficient. The beans are cheap to buy dried though.)
    Last edited by mistersloane; 03-10-2013 at 10:48 AM.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    THE YABBA
    Posts
    5,816

    Default

    With the Chinese black beans (they're sometimes in the shops as 'preserved and fermented' beans with ginger, or 'salted beans', there's loads of different types), you just basically add a couple of teaspoons of them to anything you're frying, and it's a winner. So chicken, or belly pork, or green peppers, or bacon.

    The wind-dried sausage (Lap Cheong) is a good thing to buy from Chinese supermarkets, it comes in sealed vacuum packs. The red one is pork, the brown one is duck with duck liver. You just steam it over rice or boil it for about 15 minutes, or fry it like chorizo. If you're frying it, wash it first. Here's a simple recipe for that,

    http://kitschow.blogspot.co.uk/2009/...at-recipe.html

    you dont need a clay pot.

    Or chop it up and stick it in fried rice.

    (both of the above - black beans and lap cheong I think apply as 'peasant food' as well, though the lap cheong isn't cheap over here )
    Last edited by mistersloane; 03-10-2013 at 10:47 AM.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17,087

    Default

    Nice one mister s, much appreciated.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mistersloane View Post
    With the Chinese black beans (they're sometimes in the shops as 'preserved and fermented' beans with ginger, or 'salted beans', there's loads of different types), you just basically add a couple of teaspoons of them to anything you're frying, and it's a winner. So chicken, or belly pork, or green peppers, or bacon.
    Agreed, they're great.

    Speaking of preserved lemons (upthread) I did this vegetable tagine the other night, and it was pretty solid:
    http://www.lesauce.com/2012/03/veget...ed-lemons.html
    You can skip the saffron and the fancy-pants couscous if you want, and mix up the veg to whatever you can get cheaply - I included some chickpeas as well. The olives and preserved lemons are fairly crucial, though.

    It's probably the closest I've come to a genuinely interesting vegetarian winter-veg stew, although I'm very open to suggestions on that front.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17,087

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slothrop View Post
    It's probably the closest I've come to a genuinely interesting vegetarian winter-veg stew, although I'm very open to suggestions on that front.
    There's a mushroom korma in our Nige's Real Food - not tried it but it's probably decent. Might fit the bill. Other than that I would suggest something Moroccan-ish involving butternut squash/aubergines/almonds/dried apricots etc. (probably quite similar to what you made in terms of the spice mix involved, but Moroccan food is great so that's no bad thing).
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,682

    Default

    Ah, sorry, I don't include mushrooms in that: there are various mushroom bourgignon and mushroom stroganoff type things that are great.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sevilla
    Posts
    3,626

    Default

    couple of mentions of frozen veg here - no way is this ever good with the exception of peas to chuck into a fried rice maybe.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Benny B View Post
    couple of mentions of frozen veg here - no way is this ever good with the exception of peas to chuck into a fried rice maybe.
    Far cheaper though, and in my experience if you're cooking it down it doesn't tend to make too much difference either way. Couldn't afford veg if it wasn't mostly frozen.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •