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Thread: Nick Land and Neocameralism

  1. #31

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by steveslr February 14, 2017 at 2:17 am
    Personally, unlike Mencius — that neoreactionary arriviste with his trendy but unsound Bronze Age new ideas — I don’t waste my time communicating with minions like Bannon.

    I prefer to go right to the top.

    So I issue my orders directly to President Trump through our agreed-upon go-between, new West Wing staffer Hakan Rotmwrt.

    Hakan (a.k.a. Hakon) is an Ainu-American paleoreactionary dedicated to returning the planet to the time-tested verities of the New Stone Age.

    Please note that he’s a moderate, not one of those Old Stone Age extremists. He’s not like the dozen OSA Brotherhood members who have secretly infiltrated Puzder’s staff (which is why you’re starting to hear so much about the need for a special sub-minimum wage for flintknappers).
    Wow there's like an entire internet subculture of Tyler Durdens, isn't there?
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

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    There's a kind of realignment happening, and a coagulation of new fronts.

  6. #36

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    Interesting rabbit-hole.

  7. #37

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    His later writings compiled by the fascist publisher Urbanomic struck me as vapid and downright offensive to people of color.
    When do we get to punch some of these guys in the face?

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    The anxious appeal to institutions "to do something" is very characteristic of this style of politics.

    Still, I am compelled to agree that there is a definite racism in Land's current work.
    Last edited by josef k.; 15-02-2017 at 01:03 PM.

  9. #39

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    I don't remember his CCRU-era writings (collected in Fanged Noumena) touching on anything that could reasonably be construed as racist. It is a different matter today, though.

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    hes been openly gleefully racist for years. his brand of racism is easily understood by nerds becasue it is taken from RPGs and fantasy literature. Elves are lightly built, fast on their feet and good at magic. orcs are heavily muscled, brutish and unintelligent etc etc its the first race realist decision you make on character build. incidentely you two (josef/vim) have been thinking along very similar lines. you should put out a pamphlet together.

  11. #41
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    Oh I dunno, I think he looks like a pretty fun sort of guy.

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  12. #42

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    Traditionally, university policies regulating student behavior have been closely associated with in loco parentis, or “in the place of a parent.” The doctrine holds that having taken students away from the home—the natural locucs of moral development—the university inherits the ethical responsibilities of the parent....

    With this historical perspective in mind, Yale’s campus turmoil reveals two sets of awkward allies across the last half century of university politics. In articulating a skeptical critique of university power and in denouncing administrators’ right to uphold norms of conduct, the radicals of the ’60s... find themselves the intellectual bedfellows of contemporary campus conservatives. And in demanding that administrators do more to promote a holistic account of student welfare and in calling for clearer moral guidance from the university about how students should responsibly interact with their peers and with society at large, today’s student activists use language that would have been intensely familiar to mid-twentieth century conservative defenders of in loco parentis.

    Having all but abandoned their radical skepticism toward the controlling power of mass social judgment and the implicit power of entrenched hierarchical elites, today’s campus activists are quite explicit in their appeal not to demolish the power of administrators, but to expand it.... Each of the remedies called for at Yale and elsewhere is symptomatic of a new-found faith in university administrators as responsible guardians of social justice and as legitimate moral authorities.

    Nowhere is the call for a restoration of in loco parentis more clearly seen than in debates over the proper purpose of the residential college. Student activists have rejected the charge that they are hostile to intellectual freedom and free speech by pointing to the language Yale herself uses in describing the residential college system—language that is itself a relic of an older campus commitment to students’ moral development.... [T]he colleges’ central purpose is to nurture and support students as they grow and develop.
    http://dhalikias.blogspot.co.uk/2016...ampus.html?m=1

  13. #43

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    Well, it's overt, isn't it? A sizable stretch of that Dark Enlightenment piece was spent constructing a sophisticated defense of John Derbyshire's 'The Talk: Non-black Version'.

  14. #44
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    Camille Paglia makes this argument with characteristic aplomb. Starts at the 2 min mark:



    This is Stockholm syndrome in action



    Where has this money gone?

    Interestingly, increased spending has not been going into the pockets of the typical professor. Salaries of full-time faculty members are, on average, barely higher than they were in 1970. Moreover, while 45 years ago 78 percent of college and university professors were full time, today half of postsecondary faculty members are lower-paid part-time employees, meaning that the average salaries of the people who do the teaching in American higher education are actually quite a bit lower than they were in 1970.

    By contrast, a major factor driving increasing costs is the constant expansion of university administration. According to the Department of Education data, administrative positions at colleges and universities grew by 60 percent between 1993 and 2009, which Bloomberg reported was 10 times the rate of growth of tenured faculty positions.

    Even more strikingly, an analysis by a professor at California Polytechnic University, Pomona, found that, while the total number of full-time faculty members in the C.S.U. system grew from 11,614 to 12,019 between 1975 and 2008, the total number of administrators grew from 3,800 to 12,183 — a 221 percent increase.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/05/o...s-so-much.html

    Leftist radical students are demanding increased powers for an administrative class whose salaries are driving them into poverty.
    Last edited by josef k.; 15-02-2017 at 02:25 PM.

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    what on earth are all these additional administrators doing?

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