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Thread: Exhibitions, Art.

  1. #31
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    Yeah I was waiting for that but I do think he was taking the piss don't you?

  2. #32
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    Droid would not joke about the Serious Business of Art.

  3. #33
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    Every time I go to the National Art Gallery I come across something new (which is actually old) like this. (Georges Michel - 'Stormy Landscape with Ruins on a Plain', after 1830.)

    Last week I picked this book up for 30 quid in a second hand store: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Metropolita.../dp/0847846598

    I thought I'd wasted my money a bit until last night, when having smoked a joint I leafed happily through it for hours and hours. The reproductions are often quite large, and of such high quality that you can see the brushstrokes/texture. (I know I sound a bit like someone talking about their HD TV here, but a) that can't be helped and b) I love HD TVs.) It's also great because the explanatory notes are segregated from the pictures, so that you can really look at the pictures without worrying about what this bit represents, what school this painter belonged to, etc. And really looking is the hardest part of all AFAIC (just as really listening can be with music, when you're a music nerd.)

    Anyway, factors like this allowed me to become really absorbed in the pictures, like when I was a kid looking at a picture book.

    I'm in mortal peril now of spending all my money on massive art books that you could conceivably bludgeon a man to death with.

    Definitely want to see that Hockney exhibition before it closes. I've never had the religious experience in front of a Rothko that others describe, but I probably haven't been trying hard enough. A little philistine that lives in my head keeps whispering 'it's just some colourful rectangles' in my mind's ear.

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  5. #34
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    The hockney is beyond brilliant super genius.

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  7. #35
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    I like how he paints people swimming underwater




  8. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by john eden View Post
    Droid would not joke about the Serious Business of Art.
    Droid would not joke. I meant I'd assumed hockney was taking the piss

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  10. #37
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    If he's not having a laugh, then at least I am.

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  12. #38
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    Hockney invented vapourwave

  13. #39
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    The Sun's logo SHOULD look like a toddler drew it, actually. Maybe then people would accord it the respect it deserves? The whole thing should be written in crayon. The Mail should be written in shit across Paul Dacre's rubber walls.

  14. #40
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    i went to both the exhibitions at tate britain. the human all to human one i was not interested in, and as an aside i'd never registered before how catoonish bacon is, the war one was the best thing ive seen in some time. crammed with amazing work. highly recommended.

  15. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    i went to both the exhibitions at tate britain. the human all to human one i was not interested in, and as an aside i'd never registered before how catoonish bacon is, the war one was the best thing ive seen in some time. crammed with amazing work. highly recommended.
    I went to Aftermath at the Tate today - went with low expectations but like you i was really taken aback by how well curated it was. Some fantastic german prints in there. - definitely worth a trip down Pimlico.

    FWIW i enjoyed the All Too Human exhibition - mainly for the three or four artists that i didn't know - I am not a huge Bacon fan - find his work too cold and unaffecting.

  16. #42
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    Stumbled across this today

    http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_o...and_peace.aspx

    Really love Nevinson's stuff, clearly an incredibly talented artist

    It's a very small exhibition, mind you, but free entry and then you've got the rest of the British Museum to go to, which ain't bad (leaving morals aside)

  17. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Stumbled across this today

    http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_o...and_peace.aspx

    Really love Nevinson's stuff, clearly an incredibly talented artist

    It's a very small exhibition, mind you, but free entry and then you've got the rest of the British Museum to go to, which ain't bad (leaving morals aside)
    Some good Nevinsons in Aftermath - i think he gets overshadowed by some of his peers - Nash, Ravillious, Lewis but when he's good he's really impressive.

  18. #44
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    I'm in Sevilla, been checking out some paintings. I think Spanish art (pre modern) is not interesting when not gruesome/gothic/full of pitch blacks and browns and blood reds.

    An avalanche of kitschy Catholicism out of which juts the jagged jet black peaks of Velasquez and Goya, Zurbaran and El Greco. You don't really realise how good the really great painters were until you see them juxtaposed with the merely very good painters. I mean to say that you see these Carravagio knockoffs, a thousand times better than anything I could ever paint if I practiced my whole life, but still just obviously not on the same level as Caravaggio himself.

    The one Goya I've seen here stood out more for its originality of vision, surrounded by stock poses and scenes. However, I do like that you get all these versions of the same Biblical scenes - St Whatshisface in the wilderness, St whosehischops full of arrows etc.

  19. #45
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    Forgot to say that Murillo was another A1 painter, albeit less interesting than Valesquez, more use of cherubs and so on.

    The Zurbarans and Velasquezes in the National gallery are great examples of that weird masochistic gothic aesthetic that appeals so much to modern taste.

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