Page 34 of 88 FirstFirst ... 2432333435364484 ... LastLast
Results 496 to 510 of 1316

Thread: Trump

  1. #496
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    15,079

    Default

    No doubt, but at some point even the densest person is going to twig that rising taxes and eviscerated public services can't be blamed on Mexicans and Muslims.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  2. #497
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    No doubt, but at some point even the densest person is going to twig that rising taxes and eviscerated public services can't be blamed on Mexicans and Muslims.
    Nothing easier than that: illegal Mexicans means more police to keep them in check - more police requires more taxes. Muslims are a constant terrorist threat, more law enforcement needed, only doable with higher taxes.
    Last edited by firefinga; 04-01-2017 at 12:42 PM.

  3. #498
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    15,079

    Default

    Hmm, perhaps I'm underestimating how easily dupeable people are. I suppose we've already seen that to some extent in the UK. But I'd like to think there is some limit, even if it's one imposed by Trump's own policies - e.g., if his famous wall ever does get built, continuing to blame economic problems on illegal immigrants will amount to an admission either that the wall was a complete waste of time and money because undocumented people are still somehow getting in, or that illegal immigration was never the main problem in the first place.

    In a sense, I hope something like that happens in the UK when we eventually leave the EU, because then our government will no longer be able to blame Brussels and Strasbourg for all our socioeconomic woes.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 04-01-2017 at 12:52 PM.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  4. #499
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,446

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    I think things could get really ugly (well, uglier) in a year or two, when it becomes clear that the majority of the overwhelmingly white working/middle-class Americans who voted for Trump are materially worse off than they were under Obama, meaning that all Trump will still have 'going for him' (so to speak) is his racism/xenophobia.
    It wouldn't surprise me some of his policies prove to be a short term boon for the economy, with the negative impacts only manifesting later after the midterms. Also look at how the media has reacted to Carrier and Ford, that will presumably affect public opinion.
    Last edited by sadmanbarty; 04-01-2017 at 12:54 PM.

  5. #500
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,446

    Default

    The people who know about this kind of thing are saying that Trump appears to be more of a Latin American style right-wing populist than a European style fascist.

    http://www.vox.com/the-big-idea/2017...rump-democracy

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/16/op...one-share&_r=3

  6. #501

    Default

    It won't be a great surprise if Trump's presidency is recuperated by the establishment (although there are some picks in with the Pence's and Reibus's -- e.g., Bannon and Mattis -- who are not establishment conservatives). At the same time, he represents something disruptive that has already realigned the political landscape in the States (recognition that globalisation creates losers and that they can vote; recognition of the conflict between America's self-interest and its role as gatekeeper for the international system, etc).

  7. #502
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    It won't be a great surprise if Trump's presidency is recuperated by the establishment (although there are some picks in with the Pence's and Reibus's -- e.g., Bannon and Mattis -- who are not establishment conservatives). At the same time, he represents something disruptive that has already realigned the political landscape in the States (recognition that globalisation creates losers and that they can vote; recognition of the conflict between America's self-interest and its role as gatekeeper for the international system, etc).
    The only things Trump has "disrupted" is the notion "old" mass media still matters as an election deciding factor - for THIS specific election under the specific circumstances. The notion that globalisation creates losers WITHIN the US (which isn't all that new either, the 1980s up until the early 1990s had the "Japanese panic") is already relegated to be a footnote. The Republican establishment has found its way behind Trump almost immediately after his win. The "Trump presidency" is shaping up to be a pact of Trump with the Republican establishment resulting in Trump (and some of his buddies) reaping financial gain as much as possible (=institutional corruption) and the Republican establishment getting through their agenda (dismantling Obamacare, tax cuts for themselves meaning the rich). The only field of possible conflict remains foreign policy.

  8. #503
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    Hmm, perhaps I'm underestimating how easily dupeable people are. I suppose we've already seen that to some extent in the UK. But I'd like to think there is some limit, even if it's one imposed by Trump's own policies - e.g., if his famous wall ever does get built, continuing to blame economic problems on illegal immigrants will amount to an admission either that the wall was a complete waste of time and money because undocumented people are still somehow getting in, or that illegal immigration was never the main problem in the first place.

    In a sense, I hope something like that happens in the UK when we eventually leave the EU, because then our government will no longer be able to blame Brussels and Strasbourg for all our socioeconomic woes.
    These deflecting blame games can be executed as long as you have a (relative) majority behind you. And this can go on for a very long time. Of course, you could consider a "Trump presidency" to be a system of some sorts, and any system has a breaking point.

  9. #504
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,026

    Default

    Now you've got an American President-Elect approvingly quoting Julian Assange!

    Certainly not business as usual.

  10. #505
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    15,079

    Default

    Quoting, or (who'd have thought it?!?!) misquoting? Assange has been been widely quoted as endorsing Trump in an interview with an Italian journalist, although apparently it's complete bollocks and Assange and the journalist are both pretty hacked off about it.

    Edit: the transcript is here, if anyone's interested: http://www.repubblica.it/esteri/2016...aks-154754000/ He doesn't exactly excoriate Trump, but one or two other commentators have got that angle covered, I think it's fair to say, and he certainly says nothing that could fairly be interpreted as 'praise', whether 'guarded' or not, contra Teh Graun. Of course, Breity is all over this like a rash.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 05-01-2017 at 05:36 PM.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  11. #506
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,026

    Default

    I got Fake Newsed!

    Feels good actually. 21st Century Man.

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Corpsey For This Useful Post:


  13. #507
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,446

    Default

    "[In Michigan] estimated additional employment associated with increased Medicaid spending peaked at over 39,000 jobs in 2016 and is projected to decline to approximately 30,000 jobs in 2021. About two thirds of these jobs are outside the health care sector, because of two factors. First, about one third of Healthy Michigan Plan spending represents preexisting spending by the state, employers, and individuals for which the federal government is assuming responsibility, thus freeing state and private resources to be spent in other ways. Second, about half the jobs created by the macroeconomic stimulus arise from the multiplier effect as new spending spreads through the economy. During these years, the increased personal income associated with new employment is expected to be relatively stable, at $2.2 billion to $2.4 billion per year. The added economic activity is projected to yield approximately $145 million to $153 million annually in new state tax revenue."

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1613981
    Last edited by sadmanbarty; 05-01-2017 at 12:58 PM.

  14. #508
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    لندورا
    Posts
    2,721

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Sterling at the Well
    But if you remove The Donald, and then gaze at the Republican
    alternatives, the prospect of The Donald improves by comparison.
    A Donaldless world is more disturbing than The Donald is.

    For instance, even though he's obviously a con man, a rip-off artist
    and thin-skinned egomaniac with zero interest in sane policy -- Ted
    Cruz is worse. He's LOTS worse.

    Even though The Donald's iconic, and a lightning rod for polarized
    anxieties, Sarah Palin is worse at that activity than The Donald
    is. Sure, Sarah's considered a lunatic now, but The Sarah could
    have been vice president, and maybe even President. Yes, her, that
    poor, deluded, blowhard creature. For a woman with rural rootsy
    affinities whose motto is "Faith, Family and Flag," Sarah's pious,
    right-to-lifer family is more soap-opera-broken even than The
    Donald's bizarre family.

    Paul Ryan, the current Speaker of the House, is, as far as I can
    figure, the only guy in the Republican Party with a coherent
    legislative agenda, other than looting. But the guy's a Tea Party
    fanatic. His ambitions are eye-blindingly radical, but, well, Ryan
    could also easily have been Vice President, and President.
    However bad Ryan's gonna get in 2017, consider that he could have
    been that bad years ago. Also, consider that the absence of The
    Donald would probably empower Ryan vastly.


    People worse than The Donald have been circling the Oval Office for
    years and years now.
    ...

    An extensively bad scene with deep roots in years of development.
    Even though The Donald is ludicrously disastrous, he's not some lone
    Frankenstein creature. He's part of the general texture of American
    rot. A society this extensively troubled, for such a long time,
    should probably shouldn't be pitying itself for electing a Donald.
    Better if it somehow finds the courage to confront its own deep
    inner Donaldness.
    well worth reading the whole thing
    http://www.well.com/conf/inkwell.vue...ky-page01.html

  15. #509
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    776

    Default

    Sure thing, Sterling right on the money. Nevertheless not exactly a hopeful read.

  16. #510
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,446

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •