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Thread: Radio is magic

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubberdingyrapids View Post
    bit of a tangent, but when did that trend for sampling radio chat begin? i was listening to the fourtet album from a few years back which does that but much more dynamically than a lot of the grime stuff. obv it has coincided with the fall of pirate radio, i keep thinking it seems like some burial 'mourning for a lost history' kind of thing,
    This trend brings the infamous Boomkat review of Jamie XX to mind:

    'In Colour' posits Jamie as the pre-eminent posh soul boy, lifting and massaging inspiration from the rich heritage of late '80s + early '90s London dance culture and channelling it into a pop-ready format palatable to Radio 1 daytime tastes and festival soundtracks. The putative "soul" of rare groove, boogie, hardcore and early jungle is sucked out and spliced with vocals in feathered arrangements ripened up for students and yummy mummys alike - all under one roof.
    Very harsh, yes, but I can sort of sympathise with this. I think with SOME of this stuff, there's an attempt to confer 'authenticity' on middle-class music going on...

    (I used to do the same thing when I made music on Reason, btw. Chucking a Wiley sample into the middle of a bland, sentimental track with 'deep' chords, e.g...)

    OTOH the lost history thing is OTM. Perhaps for many ppl they only experienced rave at a distance, through pirate radio at the time, or at the even greater remove of listening to pirate radio sets years later on the internet - ALA ME. And for others its a case of nostalgia, full stop.

    Also I think radio is mourned for by those that remember it, like vinyl e.g. An analogue feel, a bit of dirt and dysfunction, a human element.

  2. #17
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    btw the title of this thread keeps reminding me of that 'Derek' show Gervais did and it should have a trigger warning blocking it IMO

  3. #18

  4. #19
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    wasn't sure where to post this so picked this thread...radio still has a hold on american music listeners, obviously less so for millennials:



    https://morningconsult.com/2016/12/1...io-poll-shows/

  5. #20

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    Have seen George "Hound Dog" Lorenz mentioned in various interviews down the years but for someone reputed to be so influential, no one has bothered writing a wiki page yet. He's credited as one of the first DJs to play black Rock and Roll artists on radio, crucially WKBW then had a massive 50,000-watt signal reaching much of the East Coast and Canada. One of the earliest examples of the 'that DJ there from the beginning' mould that we would be more familiar with since.

    Not a whole lot written down online in article form, Im sure it exists in books maybe but some genuinely great snatches and memories from people. You could spend a while reading far worse on the internet. He really put the life long love in people http://www.hounddoglorenz.com/memory_time/index.php

    'The Big Heavy' would start to pound on every car radio at the drive-in, or wherever the kids would gather. It would immediately be tuned up loud as we heard...'The Hound's Around....We're rockin' in record, baby...from the Zanzibar man...for Big Bob and Pal Al. And don't forget all you hound-doggers, Don't pound the slab...Take a Madison Cab...George Lorenz would punctuate the licks of his theme song, 'The Big Heavy' with obviously his own slogans for all of his sponsors. He was the coolest DJ I've every heard. I often tell my kids of those fabulous times at the birth of rock n roll and how it was the off-spring of the Rhythm n Blues music that was played by the semi-underground DJ's, led by The Hound. I'd love to get a tape of one of his programs.
    He would play really good instrumentals like that by artists who had few or no hits as well as the popular hit songs ( I can still remember him introducing Love Me by Elvis, which was only on an album ). His commercials were crazy ( Get your snap jacks --- snap your fingers --- at Tom McCanns) because he spoke in rhyme and used slang or hip expressions. He signed off with " that's all she wrote --- that's where the pencil broke. " Most Rock and Roll shows were held in the downtown movie theaters and that's where I saw many of the now famous artists before they became famous. In 1957 Elvis had a show in War Memorial Auditorium downtown ( later torn down ) and about a dozen artists later, banded together and had a show there also, but most played in the movie theaters. Although he did not invent the term, the Hound was an intrinsic part of the rock and roll culture
    I don't remember the exact year but I was listening to the Hound on WKBW, which I did every night in the late 50's, and for some reason this night he had no coffee. Well, he played Santo and Johnny's new recording of 'Sleepwalk' 13 times in a row until someone brought him some coffee. I thought that was amazing, just loved listening to the guy.
    I remember listening to The Hound Show about 1955 or so. I was living in a tent just beside Algonquin Park in central Ontario, called the Halburton Highlands. I had an old Phillips portable radio, and strung copper wire all around the trees and plugged it in to the radio as an extra antenna. Picked up WKBW on clear nights. The hound's around! I'm rockin on record daddy-o/ from the Zanzibar tavern in Buffalo.... Then I got to hear Elvis Presley for the first time singing Blue Suede Shoes. I'll never forget that night, it was so beautiful outside, and WKBW music floating over the quiet lake breaking the stillness with ROCK AND ROLL. Party on George.

    In the earliest days of Rock & Roll music, even before it was called Rock & Roll, I was blessed with a brother who was five years older than myself. Growing up in a suburb of Buffalo, we shared a small room, with a radio on the table between our beds. At bedtime, I wanted to sleep, but my brother wanted to listen to music. “One more song,” he would say to put off my whining, “one more if it’s a good one.” And more often than not, the disk jockey on the radio was George “Hound Dog” Lorenz. “The Hound is around,” he would intone, before playing something by Johnny Ace or Ruth Brown. This was on WKBW before the arrival of Top 40 Radio. Some nights the Hound spun records live from The Zanzibar on William Street, a club that hosted performers like Fats Domino, Bill Haley, and Little Richard. At the War Memorial Auditorium, the Hound booked Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Chuck Berry. But the real history was in the audience: white kids and black kids together, loving the music


  6. #21

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    My two favourite pirate DJs at the moment are DJ PL on Vision FM (Sundays from midday) and the Suga B morning show on Venture.

    Both uniformly good. PL could be the best radio host I've ever heard.

  7. #22
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    So the first PL show I find is 5 hours long http://www.c7465400.myzen.co.uk/podc..._PL_LATEST.mp3

    That's me sorted at work today!

  8. #23
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    I also love radio. Could go without TV but without radio? hardly. Can't listen to radio while working though, I get hopelessly distracted. I am wired to listen first and foremost, that's just how I roll. However, I almost exclusively listen to programmes with high amount of talking, like reports, shows about literature or features on the Austrian equivalent of BBC. I also used to listen to John Peel as a teenager over satelite radio and later on via stream from the BBC website.

  9. #24
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    i love radio but hardly ever listen to it anymore. i don't own a car, which is where i think a lot of people listen, and when at home i tend to want to play the piles of old and new records/cds that i never seem to get to.

    i wish i could find the time to listen to radio, locking in to the right program is a great way to discover/rediscover things that you'll never get from an algorithm.

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