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Thread: How can I make a living from doing something reasonably interesting?

  1. #61
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  2. #62

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    Yeah, that was a bit fucking gnomic wasn't it?

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  4. #64
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  5. #65
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    Photographs, for hipsters who don't like digital cameras.
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  6. #66
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    As a wise man once said:

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tea View Post
    I'm convinced that anyone who tries to make work 'fun' can only be an utter, utter cunt. It's work, you do it for the money and then you go home. You're not there to have 'fun'.

  7. #67
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    I'd happily settle for something that's reasonably stimulating and rewarding. I just don't really want to work somewhere that includes a soft play area in its list of employee perks and makes it compulsory to greet co-workers with a hi-5 and a hearty "YO!".
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  8. #68
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    I might be laughed out of the subforum for suggesting this but: academia?

    Obviously there's a plethora of negatives to deal with and in many ways its less attractive than ever before but IF you manage to secure yourself a job you get paid well, spend quite a lot of time sitting around reading books, get to patronise the young, etc... A few of my friends are academics and they seem to be fairly happy with it.

    Also, you're a funny/clever sort of guy, so maybe you could write comedy scripts or something?

    My final suggestion is to become a writer of erotic fiction.

    Obviously I'm projecting my own career frustrations/ambitions onto you here so take it with a pinch of don'tgiveafuck.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    I might be laughed out of the subforum for suggesting this but: academia?

    Obviously there's a plethora of negatives to deal with and in many ways its less attractive than ever before but IF you manage to secure yourself a job you get paid well, spend quite a lot of time sitting around reading books, get to patronise the young, etc... A few of my friends are academics and they seem to be fairly happy with it.
    I like the idea of academia but I don't have a PhD so I'd be starting from scratch (or at least, from the position I was in as a 22-year-old). And frankly the idea of going back into education, even funded education, as a 35-year-old with nothing much to speak of in terms of savings is kind of terrifying.

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Also, you're a funny/clever sort of guy, so maybe you could write comedy scripts or something?

    My final suggestion is to become a writer of erotic fiction.
    Ha, thanks for the vote of confidence, mate. I'd generally assumed the image other users here have of me was something along the lines of 'annoying punster'. The undoubted king of comedy on this forum has to be Owen G with his ongoing Danny Dyer Eastenders saga. Jade Goodie: The Musical (mainly John Eden's work, AFAIR) was superb too.

    Erotic fiction? There's certainly money in it, and I've even written sex scenes of a sort into a couple of my stories. There was a (not hugely successful) thread about sex writing not long ago, wasn't there: http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=13789

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Obviously I'm projecting my own career frustrations/ambitions onto you here so take it with a pinch of don'tgiveafuck.
    I do love writing but if it was tricky to make a living writing a generation ago, it now seems virtually impossible unless you're incredibly persistent (which I'm not, really) and incredibly lucky (which I haven't been, so far, although never say never, right?). I think the success of 'authors' like E. L. James and 'journalists' like Liz Jones, Richard Littlejohn and so on argues quite forcefully that talent per se doesn't have a great deal to do with success.
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 11-05-2016 at 03:05 PM.
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  10. #70
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    Haha, I've just read through this thread and I see Craner already covered the harsh realities of having a 'passion for scriptwriting' earlier. This is the reality of it, I suppose, though all of these writers have to come from somewhere, don't they? And the quality of a lot of TV shows and films makes me think that it can't be THAT hard to at least qualify as a competent writer. But there again it's obviously so much based on who you know.

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Don't start by thinking of something cool and interesting start from wanting to make a contribution to society. So no missiles, more CAB.
    This is probably the best advice, actually. Only this morning I was berating myself for not having the urge to do some sort of charitable/humanitarian work. I think it's important for the mechanics of a job to satisfy and stimulate you, but if you're not working towards what you see as a worthy goal, even an interesting job will end up frustrating you. (And that goes for academia too. One of the things that puts me off it - aside from my weak work-ethic - is the feeling that, in the arts/humanities disciplines anyway, you're basically just writing stuff for other academics to read.) Also I would tend to assume that charities, e.g., don't attract nearly as many dickheads as other professions. Having to swallow the dumb opinions of colleagues on the homeless, for example, is something that you won't have to deal with at a charity set up to help the homeless... Again, I'm talking about my own situation here more than yours. But luka is onto something here. Perhaps working for the stimulation of one's own interests is ultimately as lacking in fulfilment as working for one's own financial interests?

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