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Thread: UK EU Referendum Aftermath

  1. #1201
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    Peter Walker
    ‏Verified account @peterwalker99

    I just bumped into Dominic Cummings, who was clutching a glass of red wine and wandering along the parliamentary press corridor, lost and looking for a particular newspaper office. This is not a usual occurrence.

  2. #1202
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    What is incongruous though is for all his smarts, Cummings basically sounds appalling at dealing with people. Straight to shouty public school bully. Hardly Machiavellian.
    I really want to see that showdown with Milne now, after you posted that piece a few days ago.
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    drum roll...

  4. #1204
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    Jeremy Corbyn, the scourge of bankers and avowed opponent of capitalism, is winning support from unexpected new quarters: two of the biggest global banks operating in the City of London are warming to the Labour leader.

    Unlikely as it may seem, he is now seen as the lesser of two evils by analysts at Citibank and Deutsche Bank, respectively American and German titans of the financial system.

    “Is Corbyn as bad as no-deal? Perhaps no longer,” said Christian Schulz at Citi.

  5. #1205
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    That was just published in The Telegraph of all places.

  6. #1206
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    Good line from Corbyn earlier:

    "Boris Johnson's government has no mandate, no morals and, as of today, no majority."

    https://twitter.com/jeremycorbyn/sta...908364288?s=21

  7. #1207
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    Woah!

  8. #1208
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    Even Nick Robinson seems to be praising him...

    Nick Robinson
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    Not long ago @jeremycorbyn faced a crisis trapped between Remainers & Leavers and was shunned by other opposition parties. Now he’s able to stand up for democracy, work with a cross-party alliance & appear statesmanlike. Is that what people mean by No 10’s new strategic genius?

  9. #1209
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    So Boris Johnson lost his first vote as PM... has that ever happened before?

  10. #1210
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Good line from Corbyn earlier:

    "Boris Johnson's government has no mandate, no morals and, as of today, no majority."

    https://twitter.com/jeremycorbyn/sta...908364288?s=21
    Nish Kumar on Twitter earlier: "Well we all know what Boris Johnson thinks about minorities."
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  11. #1211
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    So Boris Johnson lost his first vote as PM... has that ever happened before?
    Not since Pitt the Younger, apparently!
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  12. #1212
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    Boris Johnson says he is tabling motion for general election because he will not accept Benn bill
    Boris Johnson says he will refuse to go along with this bill.

    He does not want an election.

    But if MPs vote for this bill tomorrow, the public will have to choose who goes to Brussels on 17 October.

    He says if Jeremy Corbyn goes, he will do what the EU wants.

    If Johnson himself goes, he will get a deal, he says.

    He says if MPs vote for a pointless delay to Brexit tomorrow, he will seek to hold an election. Tonight he is tabling a motion under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act.
    What the fuck does that mean? He will not accept the bill? You've got to you prick.
    Last edited by IdleRich; 03-09-2019 at 09:22 PM.

  13. #1213

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    Quote Originally Posted by craner View Post
    This is why I said earlier on that what we are about to experience is what it would be like if Vimothy was the most powerful person in the country.
    wait wtf is going on in this thread

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  15. #1214
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Jeremy Corbyn, the scourge of bankers and avowed opponent of capitalism, is winning support from unexpected new quarters: two of the biggest global banks operating in the City of London are warming to the Labour leader.

    Unlikely as it may seem, he is now seen as the lesser of two evils by analysts at Citibank and Deutsche Bank, respectively American and German titans of the financial system.

    “Is Corbyn as bad as no-deal? Perhaps no longer,” said Christian Schulz at Citi.
    Full article.

    Jeremy Corbyn, the scourge of bankers and avowed opponent of capitalism, is winning support from unexpected new quarters: two of the biggest global banks operating in the City of London are warming to the Labour leader.

    Unlikely as it may seem, he is now seen as the lesser of two evils by analysts at Citibank and Deutsche Bank, respectively American and German titans of the financial system.

    “Is Corbyn as bad as no-deal? Perhaps no longer,” said Christian Schulz at Citi.

    It is not that the financiers favour the opposition leader’s plans for “higher taxes, tighter labour laws, spending increases and the nationalisation of network industries”, but that this may cause less harm than leaving the EU without a deal.

    “A year ago, a Labour government would have been a big economic downside risk,” said Mr Schulz. “These risks to the longer-term outlook have not changed, but Labour has become more decisively pro-EU over the past 12 months.”

    At the same time “a fiscally profligate no-deal Conservative government is no longer as enticing”.

    Deutsche’s Oliver Harvey sees an early general election as “the least worst outcome” because a Labour-Lib Dem alliance could stop or soften Brexit, while a larger Conservative majority would stand a better chance of negotiating a deal than the current minority government.

    Mr Harvey acknowledged that financiers were worried about Mr Corbyn, but said “these fears may be overstated”.

    “First, any market-unfriendly policies instigated during a Labour government are temporary (until the government is voted out of office), and must be set against the permanent shock caused by a no deal Brexit,” he said.

    “Second, we see the magnitude of economic damage caused by a no deal Brexit as much higher than policies proposed in the last Labour manifesto.”

    On top of that, he hopes that a Labour Government would have to rely on the Liberal Democrats, who could potentially rein in Mr Corbyn’s strongest anti-business instincts.

    “The scope for the Labour Party to enact market unfriendly policies is likely to be limited if the party is unable to secure an outright majority,” said Mr Harvey.

    Mr Schulz at Citi is also pinning his hopes on this potential coalition: “Staying in the single market and the likely reliance on partners such as Liberal Democrats would limit Corbyn’s leeway for anti-business policies.”

    Reliance on the Scottish National Party might raise the chance of another vote on Scottish independence, he added, even as remaining in the EU makes another poll on breaking away from the UK less likely.

    Last week Mr Corbyn said he would do “everything I can to stop a no deal bankers’ Brexit”, but appears to have won the financiers over to his corner despite linking them with the event they fear most.

    However, the Labour leader and his party have made concerted efforts to build bridges with the City of London, which may now be paying off.

  16. #1215
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    Apparently Rory Stewart's just said that he won't stand at the next election and he's bowing out of politics.

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