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Thread: Techno Techno Techno Techno

  1. #46
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    yeah I used to be quite into the idea of living in berlin for das techno but actually that's a living nightmare isn't it lol

    i would still be interested in living there cos it's a very nice city and a 24 hour party (albeit to mindless thudding robot music) would be a nice treat from time to time

  2. #47
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    imagine if London was just stuck in the mid 90s - endless jungle and garage raves

    actually lolll

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  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo View Post
    great piece - totally agree that techno is stuck in a form of stasis. I actually played at Griessmuehle a few month ago and played a mix of new and old stuff, and the reaction was, if anything, better for the old stuff
    Last edited by Pearsall; 10-01-2018 at 09:46 AM.

  5. #50
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    Interesting how that seems to be the case - like anybody making a UK garage pastiche today could probably do a pretty convincing impersonation of the old stuff, but seems extremely unlikely they will ever make something as good as the best tunes. The original energy and invention has gone - it's become mannered, imprisoned by the clichés set out by the founding fathers.

  6. #51
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    it's weird though, a techno stasis seems to be a lot more tolerable than the directions both jungle and dubstep went in.

    or maybe i just vicariously thrill to hearing out the landstrumm/jerome hill/perc/uk wonky techno end of things on a big rig. i guess it's like being devoted to drum and bass, yes it doesn't really go anywhere but there are always fine little additions and subtractions, the production fetish becomes the very thing which keeps it going.

    that is very male granted but techno nights have been quite mixed matter of fact...

    Now why can't i feel the same for new dnb/jungle?

  7. #52
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  8. #53
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    https://soundcloud.com/wtbpodcast/wt...y-mustard-gunn

    this sound is like electro for me i guess, it never gets old. it's also the techno end of rave fundamentalism.

  9. #54
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    Personally i DON'T think a techno stasis IS more tolerable than a jungle stasis but how about:

    Techno has a sort of stasis encoded into it, no? THUMP-THUMP-THUMP-THUMP.

    Jungle has a restless propulsive energy and so it needs a feeling of authentic excitement to it. Which is why somebody doing a perfect impersonation of dillinja circa 1994 feels like somebody doing a perfect michael jackson impersonation on stars in their eyes

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    it's weird though, a techno stasis seems to be a lot more tolerable than the directions both jungle and dubstep went in.

    or maybe i just vicariously thrill to hearing out the landstrumm/jerome hill/perc/uk wonky techno end of things on a big rig. i guess it's like being devoted to drum and bass, yes it doesn't really go anywhere but there are always fine little additions and subtractions, the production fetish becomes the very thing which keeps it going.

    that is very male granted but techno nights have been quite mixed matter of fact...

    Now why can't i feel the same for new dnb/jungle?
    I agree - I don't mind a techno stasis! (and 'The dream of the 90's is alive in Kreuzberg' is a fantastic post title). I'm in my late 30's, so I'm now at the point where I am quite content to listen to the music of my youth; it's just amusing to me that so many actual youths are happy to listen to/dance to stuff that is so close to it.

    Anyways, there has been a lot of jungle in recent years that is pretty good. Sure it's pastiche, but it's a good pastiche (in my eyes anyways); the main room dnb sound, sure, has gone in the direction of 170 bpm edm-pop, but there are a lot of artists doing fun takes on the classic jungle sound. here's a mix I did a few months back that features a bunch of different tunes from (mostly) new artists: https://soundcloud.com/sonicrampage/...lls-2017-mixes

    Quote Originally Posted by CORP$EY View Post
    Jungle has a restless propulsive energy and so it needs a feeling of authentic excitement to it. Which is why somebody doing a perfect impersonation of dillinja circa 1994 feels like somebody doing a perfect michael jackson impersonation on stars in their eyes
    haha

    still, I think that's just a mental block. if you were to hear something like a Tim Reaper tune in a rave on a big system, do you think your reaction would be, "sorry, this is new and therefore is automatically missing that authentic excitement"?

  11. #56
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    Kreuzberg is alive only if your perspective is London.

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pearsall View Post

    still, I think that's just a mental block. if you were to hear something like a Tim Reaper tune in a rave on a big system, do you think your reaction would be, "sorry, this is new and therefore is automatically missing that authentic excitement"?
    this is an interesting one

    sometimes i send my mate a track which is a pastiche of old garage or jungle and he always says 'it's quite good - but what's the point?'

    vs. the 'if it ain't broke don't fix it' ethos

    but you're right in the sense that if everything was destroyed and only the jungle survived, the aliens might not be able to actually tell what was made in 94 or 2017, and they'd be better placed (in one sense) to say which tracks, regardless of era, are 'better'

    saying that, i would be more interested in a jungle rebore if it wasn't so slavishly devoted to the classic sounds of a 3-5 year period. that's what makes it a bit 'fancy dress' (to use on of luka's formulations)

  13. #58
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    i guess with some forms of music you might as well ask 'why don't they make a new sort of ecstacy pill?'

    cos the original version works fine dunnit

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by CORP$EY View Post
    saying that, i would be more interested in a jungle rebore if it wasn't so slavishly devoted to the classic sounds of a 3-5 year period. that's what makes it a bit 'fancy dress' (to use on of luka's formulations)
    totally agree with you here, this is one of those things I find a little perplexing about much (but not all!) jungle revivalism - it basically ignores the subsequent 25 years of musical history. why the same old vocal samples, for example? I don't think I've ever heard one of these jungle revivalists sample Wiley or Dizzee Rascal, let alone any newer or lesser-known UK mc.

    this is getting a bit off the topic of techno, though ...

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by CORP$EY View Post
    Personally i DON'T think a techno stasis IS more tolerable than a jungle stasis but how about:

    Techno has a sort of stasis encoded into it, no? THUMP-THUMP-THUMP-THUMP.

    Jungle has a restless propulsive energy and so it needs a feeling of authentic excitement to it. Which is why somebody doing a perfect impersonation of dillinja circa 1994 feels like somebody doing a perfect michael jackson impersonation on stars in their eyes
    i think there's a propulsive energy in a lot of early 90s hardcore techno/hard acid etc. you hear magnetic north/kickin stuff on a rig and its this kinda colossal metallic rush.

    That stuff isn't about in much berghain techno.

    either way, its nowhere near as emotionally dichotomous as jungle, not even close. i think it is those impossible juxtapositions that you can't just capture in the studio, that aren't about nerding. whereas techno has always had this pure mechanical quality to it, even when it tries to humanise the machine. but jungle is machine contortions.

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