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Thread: Listening Clubs Tantalize Audiophiles in London

  1. #16
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    If I was an enterprising London scally, I would definitely be paying a visit to one of these - along with a van and a few rudeboys.

  2. #17
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    So are you meant to actually dance at these events, or just stand there and stroke your chin to show that you appreciate the superb acoustics?

    Also there's no way of getting around the fact that 'audiophile' sounds like it means a pervert and possible sex offender.

    There's a fair enough point later on about people listening to MP3s, which are far from lossless. I dunno why anyone bothers with them, I mean modern portable music players have enough memory in them that you can fit plenty of albums/mixes in a lossless or nearly lossless format without having to compress it down to MP3.
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  3. #18
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    Not all music is made to dance to. I'd like to listen to some albums at a volume I can't in my flat and on equipment I can't afford. I think it's a good idea but if the venues don't tolerate drug use then I don't see the point.

  4. #19
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    That's a good point. Buuuut - if we're talking about listening just for the music's sake, and not dancing, you're better off listening on really high-end earphones, aren't you?

    Yes, you're not going to get that somatic bass-in-the-body feel you get from a big PA system in a club or gig venue. But that's more important when you're dancing, so it's sort of moot...
    Last edited by Mr. Tea; 03-11-2016 at 09:17 AM.
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  5. #20
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    I'm not sure about that, there's something about sound within a space and also it's nice, sometimes, to share the experience with people you can tolerate (friends)

  6. #21
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    there's something to be said for listening in a room as opposed to on headphones. i remember smoking pot as a teen and listening to one of the early black sabbath albums on a friend's high-end audio system. it was amazing, unlike any listening experience i've ever had.

    it was good pot, though.
    Last edited by Leo; 02-11-2016 at 12:35 PM.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slothrop View Post
    I have a standard rant about analogue bores of which the crux is that if your music needs expensive analogue equipment - either on the production side or the listening side - to avoid sounding flat and lifeless then you probably need to start looking for some better music.
    the two poles are the guy insisting that modern music is all mastered for laptop speakers these days anyway - anything else is just ridiculous opulence and if you need good kit to appreciate music you don't really like music - and these dudes with their private electricity supplies: http://www.wsj.com/articles/a-gift-f...ole-1471189463

    obviously both positions are silly

  8. #23
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    It's interesting, this idea that you need to be dancing to make communal listening worthwhile. I'm not suggesting you ARE saying that, Tea, but I think it's something I instinctively feel, too. Or at least, you need something to watch. For example, a classical concert, no dancing involved, but you're watching the performers. It's harder to imagine an auditorium of people listening to a big speaker playing a Beethoven symphony.

    There IS something thrilling about, say, watching a movie in a cinema as opposed to alone, even though you're not talking or interacting with other people much at all for the duration of it.

    I suppose more than ever before music appreciation tends to be a solitary experience. I think Reynolds talks about this in 'Retromania'.

  9. #24
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    I suppose I'm coming to it from a recent incredible magical experience of listening to Bernard Parmegiani: De Natura Sonorum (1975): in my flat with my mate and both 'in the experience ' completely immersed in listening and although the audio gear is low end in the extreme our ears were improved with special mystical substances. Music is made primarily to listen to and sharing the experience makes it more magical

  10. #25
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    There's something about the act of listening that gets you closer to the ground of being, strips away a lot of ordinary grossness. It needn't be dionysian

  11. #26
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    imagine listening to this on billion pound audio equipment in a room with perfect acoustics. youd transcend this universe forever.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by UFO over easy View Post
    the two poles are the guy insisting that modern music is all mastered for laptop speakers these days anyway -
    He got a point there, though. Not all, but a big chunk.

  13. #28
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    As a sidebar, in visual terms, everything is increasingly geared towards high definition. Film has its own debate going on between digital filming and traditional filming. e.g. Nolan and PT Anderson insisting on shooting stuff on 70mm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    As a sidebar, in visual terms, everything is increasingly geared towards high definition. Film has its own debate going on between digital filming and traditional filming. e.g. Nolan and PT Anderson insisting on shooting stuff on 70mm.
    Not everything, but certain sectors of the industry no doubt. Especially manufacturers of TVs wanna shove high def. down your throat, now even 4K. But at the same time, Amazon or Netflix (Apple included) push streaming, and don't give much a fuck about picture quality. Blu Ray is practically a zombie medium, never reached the popularity of the DVD and younger viewers start out with payperview/streaming. At the same time stuff is being filmed in HighDef, but watched on rather smallish (und therefore useless) screens of smartphones/tablets.

    Just showing the shizophrenia of the entertainment industry.

    As a movie buff, I am all but happy about the dominance of tech-gimmickery over the last decade or so (High Def/Blu Ray/3-D/4K) - bc at least IMO the number of movies I find interesting has considerably dropped.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    As a sidebar, in visual terms, everything is increasingly geared towards high definition. Film has its own debate going on between digital filming and traditional filming. e.g. Nolan and PT Anderson insisting on shooting stuff on 70mm.
    They're also fucking rich, or at least have the money expected to put their foot down on that.

    Tell anyone who hasn't gotten a sterling reputation of classics to insist on 70mm and watch their careers struggle.

    We can only place the terms of engagement for experience in mediums like audio or digital based on who's willing to support the artist as an audience and as a backer. It becomes a lot of hypotheticals as to who wants what, who values what, etc. etc.

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