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Thread: Films about music

  1. #16

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    I detest the Coen brothers.

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  3. #17
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    Yeah, I liked the shadow Dylan cast over the whole story, and the last scene was so well judged. But yeah, very Coeny in a way - I just felt it was the first film I'd seen by them that wasn't bereft of emotion because consumed by a sense of its own cleverness. Possible exception of Fargo.

    (Kumiko the Treasure Hunter is a brilliant 'like the Coens but good' film , I thought. But nothing to do with music.)

  4. #18

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    Spinal Tap is probably the greatest, but that's a grim conclusion because it's, essentially, a diminution of music.

    So I think that Saturday Night Fever is probably the greatest, a celebration of the transformative effect and transcendental quality of music in the face of hard, grinding reality.

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  6. #19

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    And the Bee Gees achieved it!

  7. #20

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    Are music documentaries part of this? I only ask, because I find Martin Scorcese's music documentaries (all his documentaries, in fact, maybe with the exception of italianamerican which I have never seen but looks really good) to be surprisingly glib and amateurish, the very opposite of his great works (yes, I love Mean Streets, Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, After Hours, King of Comedy and Goodfellas just like everyone else does, I'm not being contrarian).

    He produced a massive multipart documentary about the blues which my father owns, and watching it with him I was amazed by its laziness and poor quality. He's apparently planning a Bill Clinton doc which sounds like it's going to be a cheap and embarrassing hagiography, as his Stones and NYRB films were.

  8. #21
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    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

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  10. #23
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    not seen all scorsese's music docs, but i think his documentary work is pretty patchy. the last waltz was boring, but thats prob cos i thought the music was deathly dull, until muddy waters came on, and then dylan rescued it all at the end (and im not even a huge dylan fan). the most interesting parts were the interviews and dialogue between the band, but every time that got interesting, scorsese cut to another boring live performance. could be wrong as ive not seen shine a light, the dylan one, etc, but the problem i think is that his music docs seem his chance to show his reverence for his musical heroes.

    anyone seen the oasis film from last year? (seriously)

  11. #24
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    I've heard that Oasis doc is good. One of my friends is obsessed with Liam Gallagher videos on Youtube and I can see why, he is quite an entertaining knobhead.

    Speaking of Oasis, I remember really liking 'Live Forever', more than I liked Britpop. (I'm just saying that to be cool cos the truth is I was about 10 years old and I bloody loved the Lightning Seeds in those days.)

    Also '24 Hour Party People' is a good film IMO

  12. #25
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    Some decent suggestions there, thanks. Will really have to check out that Gould film. 'Control' hasnt been mentioned has it? Cracked actor is another good one.

    Biopics touch on it here and there, and you catch sideways glimpses in documentaries, but it but it is remarkable how few films explore the phenomenology of music.

    Music. The breathing of statues. Perhaps:
    The quiet of images. You, language where
    languages end. You, time
    standing straight from the direction
    of transpiring hearts.

    Feelings, for whom? O, you of the feelings
    changing into what?— into an audible landscape.
    You stranger: music. You chamber of our heart
    which has outgrown us. Our inner most self,
    transcending, squeezed out,—
    holy farewell:
    now that the interior surrounds us
    the most practiced of distances, as the other
    side of the air:
    pure,
    enormous
    no longer habitable.

    Spectacular wrongness from Craner once again though. Unsurprising, but sad!

  13. #26
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    Can the power of music make the brain come alive? Throughout his career Dr. Oliver Sacks, neurologist and acclaimed author, whose book Awakenings was made into a Oscar-nominated feature film starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro, has encountered myriad patients who are struggling to cope with debilitating medical conditions. While their ailments vary, many have one thing in common: an appreciation for the therapeutic effects of music. NOVA follows four individuals—two of whom are Sacks's case studies—and even peers into Sacks's own brain, to investigate music's strange, surprising, and still unexplained power over the human mind.

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  15. #28
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    About the best music film. Laughable.

  16. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post


    Can the power of music make the brain come alive? Throughout his career Dr. Oliver Sacks, neurologist and acclaimed author, whose book Awakenings was made into a Oscar-nominated feature film starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro, has encountered myriad patients who are struggling to cope with debilitating medical conditions. While their ailments vary, many have one thing in common: an appreciation for the therapeutic effects of music. NOVA follows four individuals—two of whom are Sacks's case studies—and even peers into Sacks's own brain, to investigate music's strange, surprising, and still unexplained power over the human mind.
    I was just thinking about Sacks there, definitely one of the few people to look closely at perception of music and the brain. His book is very good.

  17. #30
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    Haven't seen this but I read some positive reviews of it. Film about a group of friends in Paris DJing/putting on house music parties.

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