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Thread: I Hate The Film Canon: A Thread

  1. #31
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    Some great picks from Craner there - though for a moment I thought he meant Lou Ferrigno's Cannon Hercules, and now Im underwhelmed.

  2. #32

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    Yeah, I like Carpenter too, even if just for The Fog, The Thing, Escape from New York and Big Trouble in Little China. Fantastic and original genre movies.

  3. #33

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    Nah, Hercules Unchained is a thrilling early Bava peplum entry. I will grant that this sort of thing is an acquired taste.

  4. #34
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    Yeah, I think I watched half of it at 4am on VHS in the late 90's.

    But THIS!!!!


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  6. #35
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    Cronenbergs only 1990s goodie was Crash

  7. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    What about that sword and sandle thing you were watching when me and jim were round?
    That was Giorgio Ferroni's The Trojan War. Yeah, that had a good reputation amongst the fans of this stuff but it was a bit static and overwhelmed by the budget for me. Had none of the cheap luxury, lurid sexuality, proto-psyhcedelic visyals, mad history and genre-hopping of the best of this kind. I ought to do a post on the Eurotrash thread about this stuff, as I've seen and loved so much of it.

  8. #37
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    I have a dissenting opinion on the fog, just cant get behind ghost pirates. Great OST though.

  9. #38
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    Not seen a single one of those but for Groundhog Day, which I didn't realise was hated. I love it, in spite of Andi McDowell. (Who has to be a drip, really, for the mismatch to work, even if the romance ultimately doesn't.) Can't think of a conceit that better captures the feeling of depression. Not that the world is empty but that you are trapped in some tiny corner of it.

  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by droid View Post
    Thats prime 80's eurotrash dontchaknow. Directed by contamination creator Luigi Cozzi.

  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Not seen a single one of those but for Groundhog Day, which I didn't realise was hated. I love it, in spite of Andi McDowell. (Who has to be a drip, really, for the mismatch to work, even if the romance ultimately doesn't.) Can't think of a conceit that better captures the feeling of depression. Not that the world is empty but that you are trapped in some tiny corner of it.
    I cant help but watch it whenever its on TV (yeah I know).

  12. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by droid View Post
    Thats prime 80's eurotrash dontchaknow. Directed by contamination creator Luigi Cozzi.
    I remember you loved this. Cozzi also made a cracking giallo called The Killer Must Kill Again. Worth tracking down.

  13. #42

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    Yeah it is loved by lots of normal people, but:

    1) Isn't taken at all seriously by you lot or the people I discourse with in a sophisticated way (who can even accept my unconditional adoration of Ghostbusters) because of its mushy and moral elements. (Same applies Moonstruck which is greater than any Woody Allen movies apart from Hannah and Her Sisters and Zelig, but never gets recognised as such. See also The Goodbye Girl.)

    2) In the Harold Ramis obituaries it barely seemed to get a mention, despite being the second best thing he ever did, the best being Ghostbusters.

    3) It has mush, but also serious hard edges, like the repeated attempts at suicide. Lots of people take endless and different lessons from it, to this day. It is a repeatable and profound classic.

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  15. #43
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    Yeah, it's quite amazing really how Groundhog Day has this reputation as a warm, fuzzy, mushy feelgood movie but has all the suicides and crimes and callous seductions in it. And the fact of the matter is that selfish hedonism, while a lot of fun to a point, is ultimately unsatisfying for the non psychopathic.

    Reminds me of one of Kurosawa's films, actually, the wonderful Ikiru. (Though I presume Ramis's model was It's A Wonderful Life.)

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  17. #44

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    Also, I'm not anti-mush, in much the same way I'm not anti-gore. Film is an emotional and physical medium. Feel first, then think.

  18. #45

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    This is why the French have no idea how to make good movies, and Godard is a cretin.

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