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Thread: Why Do Millenials Hate Genre?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    .
    Hey I don't make the rules here.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by baboon2004 View Post
    is the answer, dubstep?
    The surprising thing about dubstep is not so much the exodus, but the fact that it managed to create a sense of belonging/identity to begin with.

    I am not convinced that this is something exclusive to millenials either. True, I am one and I love nothing more than the moments before a new musical idea falls into institutionalised patterns. But at the same time, it seems a matter of a simple opposition between mainstream and countercultures based in music, which has been around for at least half a century. What changed is the speed by which that opposition loses its meaning and so degrades its potential as a means for distinction. It's hardly cool to like and identify with dubstep when your neighbour as well blasts it all day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by m99188868 View Post
    The surprising thing about dubstep is not so much the exodus, but the fact that it managed to create a sense of belonging/identity to begin with.
    For what it's worth, Dubstep is probably the last time that template of a music-based "scene"/underground vs mainstream thing worked, at least in the western world.

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    John, without trying to kiss up to you, that's possibly a reflection of you and not every kid is going to be as good as yours obviously. And not to sound like I'm baiting you but objectively there's no doubt people inflicting the expectations on your daughter as much as she might NOT do that.

    But then again you're in London and maybe my American-ness influences that expectation though...

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefinga View Post
    For what it's worth, Dubstep is probably the last time that template of a music-based "scene"/underground vs mainstream thing worked, at least in the western world.
    Dubstep was never underground if we're being honest with ourselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowleyHead View Post
    John, without trying to kiss up to you, that's possibly a reflection of you and not every kid is going to be as good as yours obviously. And not to sound like I'm baiting you but objectively there's no doubt people inflicting the expectations on your daughter as much as she might NOT do that.

    But then again you're in London and maybe my American-ness influences that expectation though...
    Ha! No worries, she is a good kid so I dunno. I think a lot of this stuff is mainly about boys/blokes anyway, isn't it?

    I make no claims for objectivity about the youth, just adding in my perspective really.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowleyHead View Post
    Dubstep was never underground if we're being honest with ourselves.
    I have some sympathy with that - I think by the time it was dubstep it was pretty easy to hear about. Loads of threads on dubstep forum about "protecting the scene" etc and the "wrong" people getting into it.

    But people definitely were trying to will it into being underground or the next phase of the 'arkdore continuum, something like jungle but for their generation...

  8. #23
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    not read any of the replies but youre all wrong.

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  10. #24
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    millenials dont have the luxury of genre wars - its easy to get all tribal about genre when there is an identifiable route to making money from said genre. when there isnt, you have to try a bit of everything. like in the early days of recorded music, where many/most musicians would do it all.
    millennials are more into collaboration than conflict
    their parents fought the genre wars so this generation didnt have to
    genre wars were only fought cos people were blind/blinkered/shut off to/didnt know FA about other genres - now you get rock, rap, dance music, all being played side by side on things like the annie mac show

    i think the death of genre is overstated. the idea that all young ppl now like everything is also kind of erroneous. the new tribes are hung together by other descriptors/aesthetics.

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    I said that they HATED genre, not that genre is actually dead.

    But your points about the ambiguity of how to make money from that is probably very close to the matter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowleyHead View Post
    I said that they HATED genre, not that genre is actually dead.

    But your points about the ambiguity of how to make money from that is probably very close to the matter.
    well millenials are kinda hippy ish in their idealism so it's no surprise

    plus who wants all that old boring genre war shit which must seem so old and ancient

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    That's a misnomer, not every millenial is into social justice and identity politics. Plenty are nihilistic and apathetic, and some are incredibly traditionalist and conservative in numbers of ways. That there hasn't been a Millenial rebranding of the Hippie the way you could argue crusties or ravers embodied some of that spirit says a bit.

    I gotta double back and argue Napster is what did it. Luka was right to say 'the deasthetication of music devalued it' w/ the iPod/iTunes but imho its rather 'the devaluing of music deastheticized it'. It's a chicken or egg type scenario, but iTunes really is the attempt to financially put your finger in the metaphorical dike of the fact that for the past 17 years, music has existed with the premise "Its not really worth money, is it?" lingering in the background. Obviously tape recording off the radio or even wholesale copying existed before then. But there was never services or communities built around the underlying principle of "Why should money stop me from enjoying music?"

    As a result, music does not have power. The idea of the collector of a niche genre like say Northern Soul or whatever is not basing his interests around aesthetic value but rather on depreciation and scarcity. The records become either super cheap, or super overpriced, never what their value was at the time of living in the moment. They essentially become trading cards or exclusive sneakers, or stocks and bonds. The documents themselves rarely hold their value for their service (I say that while my own collection is winking at my fucking face and taunting me for serving a lot of similar goals).

    So if the items themselves are useless, the indicators of style, of choice, are likewise made archaic. Instead music becomes a weird, smeary, glob effect of music for music's sake that is unwilling to limit itself. Every choice becomes no choice.

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  15. #28
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    That "devaluation of music thing" is an interesting aspect, bc IMO it clearly began with the dance era. Before that you'd buy an album, or a single of a singer/group you'd like and go to the concerts - which also did only last for maybe 2 hours - you would pay quite some money for the product.

    With dance all of a sudden you'd have a muscial experience more often, longer hours. As great as the music was, and also the collective experience on the dancefloor, the music as a thing you'd pay for got "devalued" in so far that you pay the entrance fee for the club and enjoyed 5 hrs of music for a bargain really.

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefinga View Post
    it clearly began with the dance era.
    I think you could quite easily argue that every technological invention relevant to music, from notation to reproduction media, has in a certain sense had the double outcome of both facilitating the growing omnipresence of music and, by a consequence, feedings its devaluation. To a point we'd now probably rather pay for silence than for music.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowleyHead View Post
    That's a misnomer, not every millenial is into social justice and identity politics. Plenty are nihilistic and apathetic, and some are incredibly traditionalist and conservative in numbers of ways.
    This reframes the question quite a bit. The term 'millennial' to my mind means white, middle class, university educated, politically correct, etc. and I'd agree that those people don't identify with genres. But if you're broadening the definition to anyone born between 1990 and 2000 then you can't really say they don't identify with genre. In London afrobeats is very much a symbol of identity. Bashment was until the last couple of years. UK drill. Mumble rap's evoked a bit of genre war. A couple of years ago weren't there tons of LA artists explicitly flying the flag for west coast hip hop; whether that be mustard-style beats or G-funk influenced things (this is more your expertise than mine)?

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