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Thread: mai lyst

  1. #31
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    As someone who was greatly influenced by Bangs' great (and still not reprinted) essay Free Jazz / Punk Rock, I was shocked by "Kind of Grim," which dismisses Miles' 1972 recording On the Corner as "garbage," "the absolute worst album this man ever put out." "On this experiment in percussion and electronics," Bangs wrote in 1976, "what little actual trumpet you could pick out of the buzz-whiz and chockablocka was so distorted as to be almost beyond recognition." But because On the Corner wasn't simply "an off-note unaccountably put on record," but the beginning of a series of releases that included such other depressing "horseshit" as Big Fun and Get Up with It, Bangs claimed that "this music indicat[ed] that something was wrong with the progenitor, that he was not [merely] indulging himself or tapped out or merely confused," but that Miles was "sick of soul."

    Five years later or, if you count Free Jazz / Punk Rock, three years later, Bangs was claiming that On the Corner was "something genuinely new," "the first jazz of the Eighties." Instead of being dead, of "having no discernible emotion in it," On the Corner is "almost obscenely, frighteningly alive." And this "change of mind" doesn't fail to implicate Bangs himself. He makes sure his readers know that, back in 1976, he "couldn't even hear it, much less feel its cold flame and realize its intentions," and "we could only grow into it [...] as time caught up with us and we caught up with Miles."

    But this new-found appreciation is not an occasion for self-congratulation. No, far from it: back in 1976, Bangs writes, "there was something wrong with me [...] I was sweeping some deep latent anguish under the emotional carpet, or not confronting myself on some primal level." He'd dismissed On the Corner because "it exposed me to myself, to my own falsity, to my own cowardice in the face of dread or staved-off pain." And this, precisely, is the value of reading Lester Bangs so long (22 years!) after his death: like Miles' music, his writhing "will pry [pain] out of your soul's very core when he hits his supreme note and you happen, coincidentally, to be a bit of an open emotional wound at the moment yourself. It is this gift for open-heart surgery that makes him the supreme artist" -- or, if you will, the great moralist -- "that he is."

  2. #32
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    what starts happening at 19.50 of helen butte/mr freedom x?

  3. #33
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    It's really punk in its attitude. It's so offensive, and pushes boundaries at the same time
    Jamie Morrison, drummer with post-punk band the Noisettes

  4. #34
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    Paul Miller, aka electronic and hip-hop musician and producer DJ Spooky. "I'm highly influenced by the collage process producer Teo Macero applied on the album,"

  5. #35
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    those twisted lozenges of bass and wah-wah
    i'm thinking of one and one in particular. and the opening and snapping shut of mechanical jaws.

  6. #36
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    all these discreet but interlocking machine parts compressed air hissing with the in and out of pistons

  7. #37
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    "A swarm operates as a unit," says Stephen Crampton, CEO of Swarm Systems, an autonomous-systems startup based in Hertfordshire. "It has a mission that it has to carry out, and it is self-reconfiguring so that if one drone gets taken out, the others autonomously change their behaviour to complete the mission."

  8. #38
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    By 1972's On The Corner, the counter culture's boundless psychic spaces had suffered contraction. On The Corner is implosive, seething with volcanic but caged energies: it's jazz's answer to There's A Riot Goin' On. In the funk of Sly Stone and James Brown, Miles found a perfect musical analogue for the early Seventies 'the world is a ghetto' vibe. The bulk of the album consists of feverish, minimal-is-maximal varations around a single bass and guitar riff. The sulphurous fizz of the polyrhythms, the viscous malignancy of the bass, rhythm guitar that etches livid weals in your frontal lobes, wah-wah riffs that coil and bristle like rattlesnakes, or choke on their own venom: this is the sound of paranoia, totally wired, uptight, and coked to the gills. You feel like the air's burning in your lungs, like your heart's hammering against your ribcage and your nerves have turned to cheesewire.
    reynolds in 1990

  9. #39
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    caged is the operative word there.

  10. #40
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    On The Corner is one of the dozen albums (for a list, send a SAE) that anyone interested in the outer limits should own, or be owned by.
    what are the others please?

  11. #41
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    need to find ‘The Electric Miles’, Greg Tate

  12. #42
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    there's so many sections you could loop and create a new genre with

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    what starts happening at 19.50 of helen butte/mr freedom x?
    this little envelope for instance

  14. #44
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    Getting back to Miles’ kinship with the post-psychedelic starsailors and aquanauts, the music of Dark Magus, On the Corner, Agharta, et al offers a drastic intensification of rock’s three most radical aspects: space, timbre, and groove (by which I something altogether more machine-like/matrix than jazz’s freeswinging drive). Making what he imagined was a sideways shift towards the pop mainstream (ha!), Miles actually achieved was a culmination of rock’s trajectory towards kinaesthetic abstraction, aka the textured groovescape.
    more reynolds

  15. #45
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    Wish I could find that lester bangs review online, it was a brilliant piece of writing

    IIRC he finally got into it listening on walkman walking through the packed streets NYC and he has this nightmarish vision of the human race as an insect colony. Or something like that, anyway it was great writing and described the music perfectly.

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