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Thread: The hip hop never ever ever stops thread

  1. #691
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    Meek Mill feat Young Thug - Backboard (2018)

    Young Thug is still great isn't he - I'd stopped paying attention
    Last edited by Corpsey; 09-08-2018 at 11:33 AM.

  2. #692
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    Jericho Jackson - Breguets (2018)

    Barz...

  3. #693
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    ASAP Ant feat. HoodRich Pablo Juan - Diamond Dust REMIX (2018)

    This beat is lovely

    Like a lovely hug

    Or like dying from an overdose of sleeping pills in a sleeping bag all cozy

  4. #694
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Not defending Drake but it just seemed funny to me that the writer is assuming this professorial tone ('lacklustre and predictable' oh how dreary) while missing a clear rhyme that the least educated listener can hear easily.
    the aspirationally-professorial tone is why quite a lot of pitchfork reviews of rap dont quite work for me. trying to write about the music far too respectably.
    or trying to mount some sort of psychological analysis of the artist above all else which can end up making the writer look a bit naive and lacking in life experience as they try to show how full of wisdom they are. young journalists trying to sound like theyre about 50. might also just be that rolling stone (?) kind of american music journalism.

    The beat feels expansive and expressive, like Zaytoven is playing from the heart with Future following where he leads. And though its hook, typed out, reads as a flex—“What I’m supposed to do when these racks blue?”—it feels more like a sigh when Future sings it, or a corrective to Howlin’ Wolf’s definition of the blues as brokeness opening the door for evil. What Howlin’ Wolf didn’t account for is how that door never really shuts.
    Literalists might say the tape glamorized drug abuse as a coping mechanism, but that would suggest any of it felt remotely glamorous. Mostly, it seemed, Future just wanted to forget who he was; nothing felt as good as feeling nothing at all.
    As he’s evolved, Keef’s detached from that behind-the-beat pocket and shifted to a more aggressive style—one freed from the rhythmic grid other artists treat as a requisite constraint, without being untethered from it altogether, a la certain Lil B releases. This unpredictability lends a chaotic tension to the music.
    He’s unafraid to use space, preferring the compositional effect of short burst phrases, rather than long, familiar cadences. (E–40’s new single "Choices (Yup)" is an example of a more traditional rapper working in this style.) Like King Louie, he will lock into a particular pattern for several lines, using extreme slant rhymes ("I just hit a stain, finagle/ I just hit a stain, finito"), as if trying to demolish the distance between words themselves, or to camouflage his thoughts. He’s made rhyming a word with itself into an art form of its own—he likes to complete the circuit early, or to let words stay static while the meaning shifts ("Nigga don’t slip, you lose it, then you lose it").
    Last edited by rubberdingyrapids; 09-08-2018 at 12:25 PM.

  5. #695
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    good quotes. it really is the worst form of writing on the internet, by some distance. only thing that rivals it is young philosophy undergraduates and post-graduates on twitter

    Creative industries have been torn apart by the ďattention economyĒ. The logic of clickbait seeps into literature (sad box-ticking tropologies), music (time series analysis: ďx must happen 15 seconds into the trackĒ), television (modulating content in response to viewership)The effect of statistical work on the userbase of these platforms being fed back into dark UX patterns is a teleological snare: it recursively primes cue reactivity for the behaviour analysed. The endgame is to diminish prefrontal inhibitory control of users, increase compulsion.That reward processing is sensitised in this way means only the most extreme content is selected for: aggressivity, histrionics, peacocking in all its forms. Everything becomes a performance. This is comorbid with the general tendency of modern behavioural marketing to encourage self-reinforcing lifestyle addictions. The telos of catallaxy as a distributed information processing system is to integrate the dopaminergic circuit and reduce individual agency.

  6. #696
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    Re: Pitchfork journalism, here's a good interview with Noz

    http://www.lebronjames.co/interviews/andrew-nosnitsky

    'Totally, I think that enthusiasm comes through. Thatís why itís such a bummer that music writing has shifted in such a way that no one can be passionate about as many things as they need to write about to make a living.

    The most positive reaction I can have to music journalism now is like "yeah, thatís good. They didnít fuck it up." That enthusiasm is gone, in the sense that somebody really needs to tell you about something, theyíre excited and they want to share it. Thatís what always drew me to music writing, but it has nothing to do with what you see on these websites. Itís somebody who probably agreed to review a record before they even heard it, then had to file it by 9am the next day so they could start working on the next thing.

    That was a huge fear for me, a situation where I had to project this totally false magnitude of interest in Mac Miller so that I could eat.

    I got really spoiled because my contract with XXL was just "file two things a week, as long or short as you want." I asked if there was any other direction, but that was it. Thatís really how you learn to write, too. I wish that could be my job. That was the Gawker model, too, and I think thatís the reason that the only people doing good journalism now are Gawker graduates.

    You have to care to write, itís not like fucking building treehouses. You canít just phone it in. Weíre at a time where the value of writing is in question, but the entire business model of these companies is to churn out this writing that objectively has no purpose. Donít you want to make a case for this? Thereís so many smart people, and then theyíd get a job at Complex and get fucking trapped summarizing a Drake Instagram post or something. Or maybe they love Drake Instagram posts. But youíre absolutely doing it right.'

  7. #697
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Re: Pitchfork journalism, here's a good interview with Noz

    http://www.lebronjames.co/interviews/andrew-nosnitsky
    thanks. lot of good stuff in there.

    I think that a lot of it’s a function of getting older, but it’s also a function of how music’s consumed, and who’s controlling these channels. All this fucking new Juggalo shit would’ve gotten no traction twenty years ago. Imagine what Insane Clown Posse’s streaming numbers would’ve looked like in 1997. And would The Source just be like "oh, we gotta put Twiztid on the cover." You can acknowledge, like, this is some shit for gutter white kids in Iowa. It is rap music, it has its values, but we don’t have to make it the center of the conversation.
    this is where i am as a rap fan lol:
    Hip-hop on the whole is in a really bad place spiritually right now. Obviously it’s always been very much a genre for capitalism, but the way people engage it now… I always use the example of Grand Puba wearing Tommy Hilfiger, where the whole thing was that black kids weren’t supposed to wear Tommy Hilfiger and so he was like "fuck that, I’m going head-to-toe Tommy Hilfiger." Or like the Lo-Life stuff, where they decided they were just gonna jack all the Polo. They literally would just go into the shop and walk out with a rack of Polo. It was capitalist, but antagonistically so. But now, if hip-hop engages with fashion, it’s like "I wanna sit next to Anna Wintour." It should be like "fuck Anna Wintour!"

    And also, I’m old. So much of what I’m saying is colored by the lens of I’m a thirty-five-year-old man right now. Sometimes I wonder why I even have opinions about, like, the new Travis Scott record right now. It’s almost embarrassing to care. Like I think about when I was fifteen, and if some dude who was thirty-five was like "I don’t like Outkast" I’d be like "fuck you dawg, how do you even know who Outkast is?" I don’t think anybody over thirty even knew any of the music I listened to. Maybe the senior editor at The Source or something.
    Last edited by rubberdingyrapids; 13-08-2018 at 06:38 PM.

  8. #698
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    "I remember when we used to resolve conflicts by rapping in the park"

    This is exhausting whinging and misreads of situations based on select perspective and it's just tiresome.

  9. #699
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    it's been clear to me for years that he doesn't have what you might call a winning personality and a lot of it is whingeing but some of it is just a generational perspective, which i can relate to. the bit about mourning the internet i can relate to. i wouldn't be so quick to make sweeping generalisations about young people not caring about music or whatever but different conditions breed a different type of relationship. things have changed and the degree to which you're inclined to lament and wail depends on your personality type i guess, and how invested you were in the superceded models.

  10. #700
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    ha, i do like travis scott. i do wonder why i should invest in all the debate around it though, like noz, esp when a lot of that seems so facile. but then maybe that is just age. im sure a lot of facile debates mean a lot to teen rap fans.
    Last edited by rubberdingyrapids; 14-08-2018 at 10:07 AM.

  11. #701
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    i sort of feel im damning noz with faint praise a little bit here tbh. he obviously does have a deep and serious engagement with music and he obviously did play his part in changing the way critics (and nerds, he keeps mentioning nerds) interpret and value rap music. he's earned the right to be respected and taken seriously and i do respect him and take him seriously.

  12. #702
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    but if i look at our kids, barty and thirdform, i don't think you can claim they dont have a deep, serious and passionate connection to music. they know more about it than i do and they're half my age.

  13. #703
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    i also really miss the old days when you would say brilliant stuff online and loads of people would applaud and tell you how clever you are. now you just get ignored.

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  15. #704
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    as wishy washy as it might sound there was a switch from an amateur to a careerist/capitalist model and a corresponding precipitous decline in the quality of writing and engagement.

    a lot of what he says i can relate to in terms of writing about grime around '02, '03, and not wanting to do it anymore when the grime versions of tom breinan came along and started using the music to build parasitic careers and profiles.

  16. #705
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    people like prancehall coming along and taking the piss out of the artists and being disrespectful while at the same time begging them to be his personal friend. all this perpetual line crossing. like you can't just be a fan anymore. you have to bustle into the limelight.

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