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Thread: The TIME Barrier.

  1. #286
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    an idea you find explicitly in rilke but is implicit in all poetry is that the outer world is externalised mind
    and everything in it correlates to a state of consciousness

  2. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by CORP$EY View Post
    the pleasure of discovering something you weren't looking for.
    this has been replaced (for me, anyway) by the pleasure of discovering that are the best/weirdest/most notable examples of what I am looking for

    I understand the appeal of the radio but at this point, life is short, time is limited, there's a lotta things to sort thru

    plus there are so many things that you could spend multiple lifetimes and still not get to even half of them, so even if you know what you're looking for there are still always new things

  3. #288
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    it is interesting how the internet - availability of information - has a tendency to if anything narrow + reinforce people's beliefs thru self-curation

    kinda suspect most people are more interested in believing they like to try new things than actually trying them

  4. #289
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    there have been times when i've not been into a particular work of art/art form/artist (album, music genre, film, painting, photography, etc.) but then been convinced to reevaluate and reconsider based upon the feedback of someone i really respect. in many of those cases, my opinion remained unmoved. but in some of them, i have "broken through" and come to like and appreciate that which hadn't previously.

    off the top of my head...i was never a fan of stereolab, pet shop boys or "seinfeld" at the time of their emergence and popularity but was convinced through various sources to reconsidered them years later and found lots to enjoy and appreciate.

  5. #290
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    Quote Originally Posted by CORP$EY View Post
    Kafka wrote:

    “I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound or stab us. If the book we're reading doesn't wake us up with a blow to the head, what are we reading for? So that it will make us happy, as you write? Good Lord, we would be happy precisely if we had no books, and the kind of books that make us happy are the kind we could write ourselves if we had to. But we need books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us. That is my belief.”
    definition of great art - a traumatic experience you voluntarily put yourself through?

    i think that applies to literature, film, theatre... there are films and novels that you end feeling "wish it were not so, but it must be so" (examples countless - McCabe and Mrs Miller, The Dream Life of Angels, Madame Bovary...)

    not sure it works with music or visual arts

    there is nothing traumatic or upsetting about e.g. "Marquee Moon" or Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony or In A Silent Way or "Neon Lights" or...

    music can grant you feelings of glory or exultation or simple well-being / cleansing clarity that are not simply reassuring or mind-closing

    is even such a thing as tragic music? tragedy is a property of the narrative form, and music isn't exactly narrative... certain most popular music is more like a loop of feeling, a frozen moment... it has to be repeatable


    talking of repetition and spirit-dulling habits: what if you find your magic, in music, and it never stops working, and it's your magic, for you and your time. so there isn't a real impetus to expand your horizons simply because every expedition can lead as easily to non-magic as to a new kind of magic - indeed it's more likely to end up with empty hands

    that's my prototype for a defense for e.g. endlessly playing old jungle and pirate tapes
    Last edited by blissblogger; 16-02-2018 at 04:54 PM.

  6. #291
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    Narratives are imposed based on the cultural designation of notes and sounds having semiotic relationships to perception. So in the western world tyhe minor keys on a piano constantly internalized by children as 'the sad keys'. The "Blues" scale, etc.

  7. #292
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    Disintegration loops is a brutally simple and effective example of tragic music.

  8. #293
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    I think the sheer beauty of music (sometimes at its most life affirming and joyful) can be moving, even devastating, reminders of the transience of life. This is particularly obvious with the work of artists who have died. The content isn't tragic but the experience is, in a way?

  9. #294
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    This entire thread is about context, its virtually impossible to disentangle context from listening except under certain circumstances; raving euphoria, adolescence, stoned bliss etc.

    The time barrier is in itself a self imposed cognitive narrative, so experiencing music in a tragic sense because of personal context, knowledge about artists or circumstances, nostalgia... is entirely valid as in the mind of the listener these narratives are inextricably linked to the sonics themselves in a fettering of intangible concept and intangible object.

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  11. #295

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