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Thread: Hardcore Continuum Autopsy

  1. #1
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    Default Hardcore Continuum Autopsy

    When did it die?

    What killed it?

    Who's responsible?

    How did this happen?

    (It'd also be nice if someone says that it's in fact not dead and then posts a few nondescript tracks that they wrongly feel signify it's continued health and vibrancy)

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    We had a great couple of weeks on dissensus, but it's slowing down again. Let's pick the momentum up.

    uk's declining jamaican population relative to african, the internet usurping traditional nuum infrastructure, the great recession, austerity, gentrification, the lack of new stimuli from jamaica and rap and other dance music, dizee's success, student nights, form 969.

    remember dissensus only works when you staunchly defend the indefensible

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  4. #3
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    droid doesn't actually think dubstep was ever really part of the continuum. crowley doesn't really think that future swag was innovative. but they pretended to for the good of the forum. pluck up the courage people.

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    hardcore continuum = british (usually londoners) take foreign (often american) genres and twist them, either in order to give it a british stamp or just because they're british and so have different influences than the foreigners

    atm it seems the dominant influences on the communities that have usually produced nuum genres are 1) american rap music 2) african dance music

    perhaps road rap and 'afrotrap' (or whatever it's called) wouldn't fit the bill as nuum genres because they haven't sufficiently deviated from their source influence yet... deep tech was definitely heading in that direction with certain tunes, house tunes that (in a sense) only a UK producer with a natural immersion in garage/jungle etc. could make

    also they haven't got the old apparatus of nuum genres e.g. pirate radio, dubplates, conspicuous MDMA consumption...

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    The particular dynamism of the hardcore continuum came from the unstable squashing together of the different people / attitudes / traditions that got pulled into hardcore. Its history since then has basically been separation and stratification and gradual dispersal of potential energy - everyone pulling out the elements of hardcore / jungle that they liked and settling into smaller and more stable scenes, which might still be good, but lack the original constant what-the-fuck inventiveness.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slothrop View Post
    The particular dynamism of the hardcore continuum came from the unstable squashing together of the different people / attitudes / traditions that got pulled into hardcore. Its history since then has basically been separation and stratification and gradual dispersal of potential energy - everyone pulling out the elements of hardcore / jungle that they liked and settling into smaller and more stable scenes, which might still be good, but lack the original constant what-the-fuck inventiveness.
    the coalition held til about 1994. then:

    the blade runner/ nick land contingent- metalheadz, pre-wub dubstep, post-dubstep

    mcing- ragga jungle, jump up? (riko, wiley etc.), garage rap, grime

    soul/ populist/ pop- garage, bassline, funky, same punters for deep tech though musically it's actually more on the blade runner side of life

  10. #7
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    Ended in 2011 for me, live fm sets in 2010 being the last sets that had the true pirate vibe.

    Example:

    https://www.mixcloud.com/Classic_UK_...march-20-2010/



    (I'm currently in the middle of uploading a ton of funky sets to this mixcloud btw so I can listen them on my mobile)

    Will continue to rep for jacking and deep tech (for a short while at least) but things had changed too much by then.

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slothrop View Post
    The particular dynamism of the hardcore continuum came from the unstable squashing together of the different people / attitudes / traditions that got pulled into hardcore. Its history since then has basically been separation and stratification and gradual dispersal of potential energy - everyone pulling out the elements of hardcore / jungle that they liked and settling into smaller and more stable scenes, which might still be good, but lack the original constant what-the-fuck inventiveness.
    yeah they are unstable and temporary coalitions pulled into being. not just in terms of race and class but just as importantly in terms of sensibility. i think we (me&slothrop) touched on this quite recently.

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    although im equally drawn to this notion of it being the history of a dialogue between west indian immigrants and cockneys, or a history of west indian immigration and intergration. it's a partial and exclusionary frame but it's an important one.

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    and although 'e' has an important role as catalyst it's important to remember its already marginalised by '93/'94 and jungle is not mdma music per se.

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    it's impossible to overstate the irresistible gravitational pull black culture, and more specifically, Jamaican culture had on everyone else here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    the coalition held til about 1994. then:
    Dunno exactly. Happy hardcore splits off from hardcore / jungle earlier, dubstep splits off from garage later. Bassline keeps a specific set of elements going for a specific audience, as does later drum and bass. The musical influence probably stays tangled for longer than the actual people, too. The East London strand that we identify as "the nuum" probably stays interesting for longer than most, but it's basically getting progressively closer to what you suspect East London would have sounded like anyway.

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    we're all obsessed with black music here. here's one example. the equivalent of heart and magic in the rest of the anglosphere play rock not chaka khan aint nobody and womack and womack teardrops

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  20. #15
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    they play steve miller, they play boston, they play things you lot probably dont even know exist

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