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Thread: Body therapies

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew View Post
    any thoughts on cranial osteopathy? alexander technique?
    I'm very into Alexander Technique. From what I understand, there are a number of rival schools - I go to a group that's teaching principles from the ITM (International Teaching Method) which was set up a guy called Don Weed. They seem to me to be very close to what Alexander originally taught and make great use of his books. Don writes somewhere that he found pupils who had studied the texts progressed quicker than those who actually had hands on work. It's a really deep discipline - there's nothing quite like it - it's the only thing that puts me into a similar space as to do Reichian bodywork.

  2. #17
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    I need to write a piece on similarities and differences between Reich and Alexander.

    First take, off top of head:
    Both deal with distortions of the organism and work physically to iron this stuff out. Both have charismatic mavericks as their founders. Both disciplines have pretty wild effects.

    Reich writes about energy and sex a lot more. His model of distortion he calls "armouring" and a specialist therapeutic expert is required to break this down. Alexander writes about thinking, and tends to work more on what he calls movement plane distortions. Although you need lessons, Alexander was self-taught. Reich also developed his own therapy though his roots are in psychoanalysis.

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  4. #18
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    im suprised you need me to point this out danny but the only thing anyone hear is interested in hearing about are the "wild effects"
    make a list.

  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    im suprised you need me to point this out danny but the only thing I am interested in hearing about are the "wild effects"
    make a list.
    I'll think on it.

  6. #20
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    no one will take it remotely seriously unless you can pinpoint effects and convince us that they are wild.

  7. #21
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    Not really the two discussion I was hoping for y'know: "post the most titillating bits of your experience for my gratification"

  8. #22

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    All you need to do is swim in the sea.

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    Not really the two discussion I was hoping for y'know: "post the most titillating bits of your experience for my gratification"
    that's what's on offer today. you'll struggle to get anyone to take you seriously if you are vague about results.

  10. #24
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    And you'll struggle to get an answer when you bring nothing to the discussion beyond prurience.
    Last edited by DannyL; 10-07-2018 at 08:08 PM.

  11. #25
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    To wheel back...that "The Body Knows the Score"book is indeed great, partly because the range of possibilities presented is so wide, and partly because the author is so human in his approach. Only drawback I would suggest is the sense the book gives that trauma is only applicable to those with a relatively narrow spectrum of incredibly bad experience (and I wouldn't argue that this is necessarily intended by the author....just a feeling I got while reading it, the focus upon war veterans and young people leaving care) - whereas I would argue that a huge number of people are traumatised to a lesser or greater degree. Almost everyone would benefit from body and mind therapies, in other words.

    Popularity of mindfulness definitely an attempt to deal with the overwhelming amount of stimuli we're subjected to these days. Pity practitioners are often so invested in the 'lifestyle' and assuming the 'mindful character' (reflexive project of the self, as Anthony Giddens would - very usefully - frame it) rather than concentrating on the pure therapeutic aspects....but obvs everything under capitalism is mined endlessly for its social status. That Andy Puddicombe interview with Russell Brand is very good because he's clearly not doing that. I recently took a mindfulness course with another former buddhist monk who could have been confused for a Sacha Baron Cohen pisstake of mindfulness.

    Did anyone see the documentary 'The Work'? I thought it was incredible, even if by its very nature it's hard to see how there wouldn't have been ethical issues in making the film (but perhaps less than for many other documentaries). So powerful, reduced me to tears by the end. Must watch it again, I'm thinking as I write this. It really captured the linkage between mind and body, in trauma as in everything else.

    Alexander Technique is very interesting though I only know the very basics so far, picking apart the automatisms of everyday life where a lot of us barely notice that our bodies exist cos we're so lost in our minds...but even as this is so, the body cannot help but tell the story of what is going on in the mind.
    Last edited by baboon2004; 10-07-2018 at 11:22 PM.

  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    And you'll struggle to get an answer when you bring nothing to the discussion beyond prurience.
    it's a strange way to think of it. i wasn't assuming the insights you got were all sexual or even predominantly sexual. i was just suggesting that given it's something none of us know anything about you may need to be a little more focussed and specific rather than just going woah man. then we can participate

  13. #27
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    I reckon this thread crosses over with the psychedelic drugs thread, with the increasing mainstreaming of the idea that MDMA can be used to combat PTSD. But frustrating that the insistence is upon talking therapies (as valuable as they can be) as the inevitable partner to ecstasy...seems like not enough people have read Bessel van der Kolk's book

  14. #28
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    It's been widely read I think - it seems to me to be a coming trend in therapy, riding the wave of interest in embodiment, mindfulness etc. Though in reality the real battle probably is with funding issues, and the short-term, easily quantifiable treatments that end up being prescribed in the new austere environment.

    Busy with work stuff for next few hours so a longer response in a bit.

  15. #29
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    Oh absolutely, funding is the underlying reason for most policy decisions, but usually talking therapies are jettisoned for these reasons , as well as not lending themselves to quantifiable results - unless I'm misunderstanding and by 'talking therapies' they mean 6 weeks of CBT rather than psychotherapy.

    Was thinking of the chapter in BKtS where a variant of yoga showed itself to be a potentially more effective initial counter to PTSD than talking therapies...and would also be cheaper.

    Cool, I'll check back later.
    Last edited by baboon2004; 11-07-2018 at 09:08 AM.

  16. #30
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    its funny cos i just thought alexander tech was about the spine and since i started spending all day sitting down and typing like the rest of you i've had minor back issues and ive found lying down on on my back like im giving birth as in alex tech and yoga is very helpful. but dont know what it has to do with prurience. so weird paranoid and defensive.

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