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Thread: In defence of post dubstep

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    top button on your shirt done up. huf cap. limited release trainers from footpatrol. hand stitched japanese 'streetwear; hoodie. ' goldsmiths replaces pirate radio as training ground and academy. the home counties displace london.

    none of which makes the music bad necessarily. just noting that the gentrification of neighborhoods was accompanied by the gentrification of the fashions and the music (and, to some extent, the food) endemic to those neighborhoods.
    i cant argue with that tbh.

  2. #17
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    its making me think. but what can be wrong with a communal appreciation of music?

    this will make it the 10th "post-dubstep" track in this thread:



    I defy anyone to say it doesnt bang

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    top button on your shirt done up. huf cap. limited release trainers from footpatrol. hand stitched japanese 'streetwear; hoodie. ' goldsmiths replaces pirate radio as training ground and academy. the home counties displace london.

    none of which makes the music bad necessarily. just noting that the gentrification of neighborhoods was accompanied by the gentrification of the fashions and the music (and, to some extent, the food) endemic to those neighborhoods.

    how could this be more than a couple hundred people? unless im totez overestimating the UK

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by deletia View Post
    I defy anyone to say it doesnt bang
    it doesn't bang. head nodder for a couple minutes toward the end but bang, hell no.

    nothing against floating points, big respect to dude for his work as a dj and especially unearther/promoter of rare disco etc gems w/Melodies International

    also, what does it matter tho? if you think it bangs that's all that matters. to this whole thread/notion in general as well.

  5. #20
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    I was never a big dubstep cat and a lot of it was straight trash but none of this comes remotely close to prime DMZ, Skull Disco, etc material

    I did kinda like that Deadboy track, like 93ish jungle (yes!!!) filtered very heavily thru Burial (OK, I guess)

    but again I mean if you like it or anyone else likes it good for them, and props for putting the effort in to show us the error of our ways even if I ain't convinced

  6. #21
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    there's no there there with like 99% of this

    even if I didn't know any contextual details I would definitely assume upon hearing this it was the product of the kinda bland gentrified "good" taste luka mentions

    it is what it is

  7. #22
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    I vaguely remember liking a couple future garage tracks when it was new

    but then otoh that was before I deep dived back into actual garage and discovered it was (unsurprisingly) like 10000x better

    not that I blame the producers or anything, you can only be a product of your particular historical moment

  8. #23
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    dubstep was a false genre. it's not going to stand the test of time. there was a gap at the end of dnb where something new was needed and dubstep plodded in in a shroud of skunk smoke and pseudo deepness. gratuitous & boring, it managed to hoodwink a desperate moment that it was actually a music, when at best it was a formulaic set of sktetches that should have stayed in the margins of the school books it was written in. the fact that many of the players so easily jumped ship to climb aboard the house and techno bandwagons speaks volumes.

  9. #24
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    There's some parallels with dubstep & electronica, a strain that taps into the same nerdy emo melodic thing that classic WARP and Rephlex did so well, the scene then split like a cell with wobble going the way of happy hardcore and post-dubstep going full IDM. Decreasing circles of Nuum. We did a mix about it.

    http://www.weareie.com/2008/09/bloga...ubtronics.html

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    top button on your shirt done up. huf cap. limited release trainers from footpatrol. hand stitched japanese 'streetwear; hoodie. ' goldsmiths replaces pirate radio as training ground and academy. the home counties displace london.

    none of which makes the music bad necessarily. just noting that the gentrification of neighborhoods was accompanied by the gentrification of the fashions and the music (and, to some extent, the food) endemic to those neighborhoods.
    i remember going to a couple of nights with Joy Orbison, Floating Points and the rest when they took over - cos I do like some of the music - and the atmosphere was fucking grim after the joys of UK funky. Back to what i was told nightclubs were like before acid house, joyless

    i'm not a dubstep fan either, but the worst night at Fwd was surely 1000 x better than that

  11. #26
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    I wouldn't really defend post-dubstep as a lot of it has aged badly and wasn't even that great at the time.

    Dubstep circa 2006/7 I do defend, although I don't think it has aged very well, perhaps because it was such a contextually effective music - depending on sub woofers tickling your nose and so on. Garage e.g. sounds great on a bluetooth speaker - and is also joyful music, by and large, unlike dubstep, which isn't the sort of thing you wack on at an afterparty.

  12. #27
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    i like this one, tactile drums. spliffhead garage with those voice samples.




    tbf i hate the post-dubstep crowd not some of the music as such which was decent deep club music if very transitory. i mean there has always been a working class connoisseur element to uk dance music. like ambient jungle wasn't quite the gentrification of jungle, not until a while at least. but that wasn't really post-dubstep i wouldn't liken it to rare groove clubbing for all its exclusivity, the ramifications of post-dubstep are arguably much worse.
    Last edited by thirdform; 23-08-2018 at 01:00 PM.

  13. #28
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    this is really the one tho, electro ardkore



    fond memories of surgeon rinsing this.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    I wouldn't really defend post-dubstep as a lot of it has aged badly and wasn't even that great at the time.

    Dubstep circa 2006/7 I do defend, although I don't think it has aged very well, perhaps because it was such a contextually effective music - depending on sub woofers tickling your nose and so on. Garage e.g. sounds great on a bluetooth speaker - and is also joyful music, by and large, unlike dubstep, which isn't the sort of thing you wack on at an afterparty.
    garage isn't joyful in the rave sense it's smooth and sexy that's different to being joyful. happy hardcore was joyful hence being really melancholic and whats why i find the comparison of wobble to it a bit odd. Wobble was like shy fx wolf extended into infinity.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by pattycakes_ View Post
    dubstep was a false genre. it's not going to stand the test of time. there was a gap at the end of dnb where something new was needed and dubstep plodded in in a shroud of skunk smoke and pseudo deepness. gratuitous & boring, it managed to hoodwink a desperate moment that it was actually a music, when at best it was a formulaic set of sktetches that should have stayed in the margins of the school books it was written in. the fact that many of the players so easily jumped ship to climb aboard the house and techno bandwagons speaks volumes.

    well uk funky crowds jumped ship to tech house bandwagon. so i don't think tthat's the problem per se. I think with the post-dubstep boys they fetishised the berghain end of techno rather than taking pride in their own weird and fucked up techno history. no magnetic north, no sativie, coin operated, uglyfunk etc. which was inevitable because the post-dubstep boys defined themselves against rave, a conscious disownment of the childs impulse to play.


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