Results 1 to 15 of 44

Thread: Quotes from books that have lit you up

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,112

    Default Quotes from books that have lit you up

    As in - they've stuck in your mind, they've sent subtle shock waves through your thoughts and feelings, they've become part of you. Stuff you've underlined and made a note of. Could be of anything you've read, could be of stuff you're reading now. As a complinent to the what are you reading thread - what are you remembering, reciting?

    I'm gonna be lame now and just say that lately I've often been thinking about "all the world's a stage", in connection with wondering about the self, about creativity in nature and all through biological and astronomical life, all sorts of things. (And Shakespeare's general concerns with people playing roles and being played BY them.)

    It is a stage on which you will perform whether or not you know it.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Corpsey For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    16,492

    Default

    a patchwork quilt of quotes sounds like it could be good.

  4. #3

    Default

    Most androids I've known have more vitality and desire to live than my wife. She has nothing to give me.
    Just finished Do Androids Dream.. and this line is first up whenever it pops into memory.

    In the Westwood Studios PC game of Blade Runner, there's another similar line about the androids yearning to live. I'm not sure why it strikes me as so profound but it does.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    16,492

    Default

    here is a list of jh prynne quotes i made for a friend with the names of the poems they are taken from also included.

    of sanguine fire
    ("Outwash and Pie face across the table,
    synergic coils wound through the house of
    Mercury where they dwell.")
    a new tax on the counter-earth
    ("the stupid slow down and become wise with inertia
    and instantly the prospect of money is solemnised to
    the great landscape. It actually glows like a stream of
    evening sun, value become coinage fixed in the grass crown.")
    the ideal star fighter
    ("the eye converts the news image into fear enzyme")
    l'estase de .poher
    ("Rubbish is pertinent; essential; the most intricate presence
    in our entire culture; the ultimate sexual point of the whole place
    turned into a model question.")
    the kirghis diasters
    ("the muse in reckless theophany gives a familiar yell")
    the bee target on his shoulder
    ("do not love this man. He makes Fridays unbearable")
    a note on metal
    ("gradually the item-form becomes iconized...
    The metonymic unit is established, and number replaces
    strength or power as the chief assertion of presence")
    chemins de fer
    john in the blooded phoenix
    a stone called nothing
    ("the lights dip as the driver presses the starter
    and the bus pulls away to leave for the moonstruck
    fields of the lower paid.")
    questions for the time being
    ("as Wyndham Lewis tried so fiercely to explain")
    thoughts on the esterhazy court uniform
    ("the place is entirely musical. No person can live there")
    aristeas, in seven years
    ("and sprang with that double twist into the
    middle world and thence took flight over the
    Scythian hordes and to the Hyperborean,
    touch of the north wind
    carrying with him Apollo.")
    the common gain, reverted
    ("the nomad is perfect but the pure motion
    which has no track is utterly lost")
    on the matter of thermal packing
    ("the skin porous to the eloquence of")
    first notes on daylight
    ("we owe that in theory to the history of person
    as an entire condition of landscape")
    the glacial question, unsolved
    ("we live in that question, it is a condition of fact")
    bronze : fish
    ("that's the human city, & we are
    now at the edge of it. Which way
    are we facing. Burn the great sphere:
    count them, days of the week.")
    moon poem
    ("the night is already quiet and I am
    bound in the rise and fall: learning
    to wish always for more. This is the
    means, the extension to keep very steady
    so that the culmination will be silent too and flow
    with no trace of devoutness")
    the western gate
    ("the formal circuit is inclusion. the line runs
    inflected but the shapes are blue & shining.
    It is the orbit, tides, the fluctual spread,
    we shiver with reason and with love:")
    in the long run, to be stranded
    ("it's time or more clearly
    the sequence of year; a thickening in the words
    as the coins themselves wear thin")
    numbers in time of trouble
    ("whichever time standard we're on, the question
    of how fast and whether it's worth it, we are
    underlaid by drift in the form of mantle, and
    that should at least be a start")

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    16,492

    Default

    one for the dematerialisation thread this, from Rilke's 9th Duino Elegy

    Praise this world to the Angel, not the untellable: you
    can't impress him with the splendour you've felt; in the cosmos
    where he more feelingly feels you're only a novice. So show him
    some simple thing, refashioned by age after age,
    till it lives in our hands and eyes as a part of ourselves.
    Tell him things. He'll stand more astonished: as you did
    beside the roper in Rome or the potter in Egypt.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,112

    Default

    Re: the above

    Just come across this Blake quotation in a book about Joyce:

    "Eternity is in love with the productions of time."

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Corpsey For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,112

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pattycakes_ View Post
    Just finished Do Androids Dream.. and this line is first up whenever it pops into memory.
    What is the significance of this quotation for you, or are you completely in the dark?

    I don't know who's speaking or the context but it seems to me the interesting part is "She has nothing to offer me". Because it's as if the speaker is judging his wife according to how she acts towards him.

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,112

    Default

    "We're always thinking of eternity as an idea that cannot be understood, something immense. But why must it be? What if, instead of all this, you suddenly find just a little room there, something like a village bath-house, grimy, and spiders in every corner, and that's all eternity is. Sometimes, you know, I can't help feeling that that's what it is."

    Dostoevsky on eternity. Or rather, a character of his mistaking eternity, as Macbeth, in his despair, mistakes the existential roar as "sound and fury signifying nothing" (I assume).

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    16,492

    Default

    jh prynne explaining the basics. from a letter to charles olson

    "I am struck with the need to readjust parts of THE CHINESE WRITTEN CHARACTER, as a chap-book,
    towards some sense of the hinges in European language or it's northern groupings considered in general.
    "the transference of force from agent to object," write Feneollosa, "which constitute natural phenomenoa,
    occupy time. Therefore, a reproduction of them in imagination requires the same temporal order." Here EP
    interposes the gloss, "Style, that is to say, limpidity, as opposed to rhetoric." Hence the simple declarative
    sentence with one transitive & active verb, furnishes the kinetic type. But where are the sources of this force,
    how is access to them won out of the ambient silences which surround man on the brink of speech? From
    the things themselves has been the answer, and in the final reckoning must always be. Things are nouns, and
    particular substantives of this order are potential storehouses of potential energy, hoard up the world's
    available motions. But there are other energies: the compelling human necessities, the exhaling of breath,
    the sugar which feeds the muscles of the diaphragm and lung. It seems probable that this source was
    channeled into speech simultaneously with if not before, the substantive pictogram or derived lexiograph.
    To sing is to modulate and make audible the breathing, declare the bodie's functioning, it's various rhythms,
    like shouting or the groan of agony."

  14. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    What is the significance of this quotation for you, or are you completely in the dark?

    I don't know who's speaking or the context but it seems to me the interesting part is "She has nothing to offer me". Because it's as if the speaker is judging his wife according to how she acts towards him.
    It's the main character Rick Deckard. He's stuck in a dysfunctional marriage with his depressed wife and he's fallen for one of the androids he's supposed to take out. Guess I like the line because I relate with the android perspective, outside looking in and desiring idealised stuff. And then to tag it with the line about the wife somehow refracts it out into this really bleak image of Rick. Hit me pretty well.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to pattycakes_ For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    364

    Default

    “It was written I should be loyal to the nightmare of my choice” (Heart of Darkness) always stood out to me.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to version For This Useful Post:


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •