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Thread: Low End Theory. A book by Nomos

  1. #31
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    i for one think it sounds brilliant.

  2. #32
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    blissblogger's prbably just some failed music writer. thought he was going to be the next reynolds or something. come off it mate.

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  4. #33
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    probably works for the citizens advice bureau. tries to start twitter feuds with polly toynbee. she's not even reading them mate!

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  6. #34
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    Winchester is mentioned in this book.

    A communist world government with the masses enslaved through a micro-chip world currency and I believe robotic soldiers. NOT GOOD for any of us. Could you explain why the 2016 Olympic stadium is shaped like a giant Triangle with an Eye over the top of it? Which is the major Illuminati symbol.I believe that they are going to try and make the world believe that it is a good thing.

  7. #35
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    Jesus. Haha. Thanks, Luka. I started drafting a post a week ago and then didn't check back until today. Now this.

    I'll add some things...
    Last edited by nomos; 14-02-2019 at 03:24 PM.
    BOOK: sound/bodies // paul.autonomic deeptime.net

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  9. #36
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    FIRST OF ALL: The book has almost zero to do with dubstep, and dancefloors are just one chapter.

    What it's really about is how low-frequencies recast sensoria and surroundings and how people in various times and places have experimented with that, developing technologies and strategies for exploiting and intensifying those effects, for various purposes. It draws on sciences of sensation and acoustics, histories of sound technologies, philosophies of materiality and a lot of other things.

    I started by looking at sound system cultures, but when you start following vibration around - across time, cultures - you end up discovering a lot of peculiar stuff that's usually mentioned only passingly, as a curiosity, and that's never been examined in any sustained way.

    So the largest chapter is on ritual/religious uses uses of low tones and bass-making technologies (there's a section on pipe organs, for example; another on burial mounds acting as massive, earthen Helmholtz resonators, 600 000lb bells and so on). Another chapter looks at sub-perceptual waves implicated in various sorts of hauntings ('ghosts', hums, etc.), piecing together offhand comments by scientists about eerie presence-absence effects of infrasound that have never been properly followed up. Then sound art and experimental musics looks at how artists made taken vibratory perception as their medium.

    LET.JPG

    https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/low-end-theory-9781501335914/

    CONTENTS:

    1. The Sonic Body: An Ethico-Acoustic Toolkit
    Sonorous Relations
    Tales and Strategies
    Myth-Science in the Vibratory Milieu

    2. Spectral Catalysis: Disquieting Encounters
    Spectres of the Manmade Unknown
    Infrasound
    Unhomed
    Boo! (toward an operative reality)
    The Hum
    'And it was only by analogy that it could be called a sound at all...'
    Blinkered Science
    We still do not know what a sonic body can do...

    3. Numinous Strategies
    Learning to Play the Sonic Body
    The Nervous Piano
    Numinous Instruments
    Religious Audiogenesis
    Numinous Sound Design
    Playing the Resonances
    Tellurian Organs
    The Organ-Church Assemblage
    The Arcanum: An Ambulant Myth-Science
    The Nervous Organ
    Baroque Affect Engineering
    The Gothic Assemblage: Applied Synaesthetics

    4. Tone Scientists I: Vibratory Arts
    Cymatic Arts
    Documentary Practices
    A Speculative Turn
    Perceptual Abstraction
    Transversal Strategies
    Incipient Dance
    Sonic Architectures
    Dance With the Speaker
    'A people of oscillators'

    5. Tone Scientists II: Bass Cults
    The Lab
    The Science
    Bass Science
    Dubplates and Mastering
    Engineering the Vibratorium
    Affects and Affectations
    Entering the Rhythmachine
    Three Physio-Logics
    Jungle (1994)
    Dubstep (2005)
    Footwork (2009)
    Last edited by nomos; 14-02-2019 at 03:39 PM.
    BOOK: sound/bodies // paul.autonomic deeptime.net

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  11. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by blissblogger View Post
    i haven't read the book, but i do feel a bit like bass as a theology is a little worn out

    i'm afraid the very title "low end theory" makes me droop a little bit

    by the time people started going on about "bass weight" - circa the height of dubstep - it felt like something that had been canonised into almost a form of sonic virtue, after a good decade or two of writings about dub etc
    In fairness to me, I started working on the book in 2005 (PhD thesis, right after launching Riddim.ca), finished in 2012. Set it aside and then it came out in hardcover in 2016 ($150 so why bother promoting), softcover 2017. So if anything feels a bit dated, that would be why.

    BUT it's also not trying to work on a contemporary timescale. Most of the things it describes go back decades, if not centuries, millennia, eons.

    The original title was: BASS: A MYTH-SCIENCE OF THE SONIC BODY. But publishers like more digestible things.
    Last edited by nomos; 14-02-2019 at 03:24 PM.
    BOOK: sound/bodies // paul.autonomic deeptime.net

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  13. #38
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    Hey nomos, I haven't bought your book but I thought you might like to know I still give your 'Vibration Sympathique' mix a spin now and then when I want to get spooked out with some good dread-y, drone-y bass.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

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  15. #39
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    Don't blame me mate I've read it I like the thing!

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  17. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I asked myself why these projects always seem to lean so heavily on Deleuze and Guattari (with Spinoza & Nietzsche hovering in the wings) and it's really just cos they're the only ones who allow you to have fun without the finger wagging isn't it.
    but still very strange when you consider the importance of purposeless causality to deleuzian metaphysics - in contrast with music, for which purpose and intentionality are obviously central

  18. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by vimothy View Post
    but still very strange when you consider the importance of purposeless causality to deleuzian metaphysics - in contrast with music, for which purpose and intentionality are obviously central
    Im not sure Im following you here.

  19. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Im not sure Im following you here.
    You've surely known vim for long enough to realise that this is usually the point.
    Doin' the Lambeth Warp New: DISSENSUS - THE NOVEL - PM me your email address and I'll add you

  20. #43

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    just that music is characteristically purposeful whereas for delueze the universe is purposeless, so there's almost a strange contradiction lurking in the background when music theorists draw on the language of delueze which doesnt ever seem to be addressed

  21. #44

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    btw, I also love the vibration sympathique mix!

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  23. #45
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    If Deleuze isnt worried about whether kafka bacon proust etc is purposeful/purposeless I don't really see why this should trouble music critics. Again, perhaps I'm missing something.

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