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Thread: New Stuff.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    it's precisely the trashy drug noise that makes dance music so radical.
    That's quite true: take out its weird/eerie drug-related character and you have music merely suitable for fitness clubs, supermarkets, and preteens. High- and lowbrow redefined.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    not interested in new rnb. you're taking a 60 year old genre and flagging its dead corpse. Even more old than techno. who cares? I'll check out lsdxoxo though. wasn't big on yves tumor.
    I'm not a tumor fan but he's not r'n b at all, I used avant-r'n b as a cheeky description but he's well outside that. we might not dig it personally but stuff like him or arca are def new sounds. they aren't driving a galvanizing scene in London, but surely that's not the only criteria for "new", right?

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  5. #33
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    no the problem is that stuff is basically upmarket selfie sex music but noise aesthetics have to be made upmarket now as that new commentariat are basically a generation above their guttertrash parents an grandparents. either that or radical art has been totally made mainstream and topdown. that's why i don't get on with it. there is pain in it but no snarling guttersnipe values at all. none of the dangerous sexiness of 2step dubs for instance, or the back alley vibes of a lot of disco and industrial, or even the hyper soul of zapp. again we're talking about the gnostic overloading of circuits. can yves tumor do that?

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  7. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    When I say "new", I don't necessarily mean innovative. I also mean good music that was made recently.
    ah, ok, my mistake. I thought you were just looking for new styles.

    in that case, third is correct: everything was better back in the day.

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  9. #35
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    quite into the new rich devine as well, usually im a bit ambivalent about modular wank but he seems to be able to quirk some eerily aquatic bleeps out of it.


  10. #36
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    also well into rashad becker. i mean he has managed to somehow make genuinely alien music for the 21st century. feels like some multitentacled extraterrestrial lifeform. very synaesthetic.


  11. #37
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    this guy is better when he's on an iranian rob hood flex that's when i really rate him but when he goes exclusively for the hard lsd nanotechnology futurism im less interested.



    albums are a mixed bag. more exciting than arca's solo work but also a lot of this global diasporic conceptronica seems to have um. different reference points than i do. i hardly revisit my metal and short lived prog rock phase. i hate (at least temporarily) most metal apart from grindcore these days as well, even black metal. boring shit.

  12. #38
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    yeah the Becker stuff is really strange - does make you think of processions and court pageantry of an alien empire

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  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    RA ran a feature on him a few years ago, he has a pretty unique approach - https://www.residentadvisor.net/features/1941

    But when he discusses the music he's making outside his day job—and it's worth stressing that the music he's making falls well outside the bulk of what passes through his limiters and equalizers—he sounds more like a man of letters, delving into character development, tone and storytelling. His trombone is an instrument, but he's essentially interested in it as a literary device. "I would write novels if I had more talent with that," he says. "But I have more talent with sculpting sound than I have with writing words."

    - - -

    "I really don't feel my music is experimental music," he says. "I reject that notion because I'm not experimenting." He explains that most of the music you'd find sharing shelf space with Notional Species isn't particularly experimental, either—it's made with electronic, synthetic elements that occasionally sound wild and abstract, but it's more or less mimicking sounds and structures that have been used before. "This is the same kind of disappointment that I get when I look at animated movies, and I see that they just use very classic camera schemes. I'm always like, why don't you make use of the option, the possibility, to do something within animation that can't be done with a real camera?"

    - - -

    "At the end of the score, I have a list of names. They show me the features that these characters have and also the features they share with other characters. Then I sit down and sonify it."

    Becker says he tends to squeeze "the same kind of character out of most of the machines that I encounter" during this sonification process, and I ask if he can characterize it. "It's rather the progressions," he explains. "It's the envelopes and the harmonic progressions that the sounds have that are all—like syllables, maybe. These are the progressions that I obviously, or naturally, or automatically look for, that resemble speech, breathing and performance, that represent a certain actual shape of a body."


    With the characters achieving something like completeness, Becker starts honing the pieces of music they'll occupy. He spent some years working on theatrical productions, and he approached committing Notional Species to tape the way a director might put together a play if he was also acting in every role. His goal with each of the album's eight pieces was to press record and perform them in the studio, with a minimum of mixing and post-production. "I appreciate that generally in recorded music—to just record music, not record fragments, not record tracks, but be in charge of the decisions that you make while playing music."

    He says he's long had an affinity for music made in the days before multi-track recording, when music had to be performed and errors weren't so easily scrubbed out. When he first started Clunk, he intended to only commit two tracks to tape—one for each stereo channel. "The flaws, and the courage to live with these decisions—it gives the music some timeless tension that has by a large scale disappeared nowadays in music production."

    I remember him in the wire saying something like I love traditional music but i don't want to understand how it works technically because of all its connotations and it demystifies it. i think that's also the attraction for electronic music for a lot of us. if we start dissecting it we basically become squeaky clean dnb or psy trance engineers. It's weird because electronic music is not punk in that way - like a lot of the newer dance records do actually sound more bigger in a club compared to older stuff. that's not really an opinion. i'm never sure how to deal with it. like i saw konstrukt live in 2015 or was it 16 and it was like this free jazz stuff you only get a fraction of it on the record. people chat about dmz and that but tbf with all respects to those guys the sheer propulsion of hearing a free jazz drummer or brotzmann scronking away. you can't really turn that up on a big system. it's the very travelling of air particles, you can hear the drummers hands or the breath on the sax.
    Last edited by thirdform; 09-02-2019 at 03:50 AM.

  15. #40

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    brazil 150 is quite good in a scruffy way

    https://soundcloud.com/cabelaotrn22/...-2k19-testzada

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Huerco S. has been decent for a while too, his ambient album was good and the Pendant stuff and his West Mineral label caught my ear. He's got some new collab thing on the way with some of the other people on the label that sounds alright - https://boomkat.com/products/ghostride-the-drift
    One of my favorite artists the couple of years if might say so. Ambient rural techno jams. Colonial Patterns is a masterpiece.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo View Post
    everything was better back in the day
    I'm sure it's partially tongue in cheek, but I see this and I think, no

    it was just different back in the day. what does "better" even mean? it's art.

    I don't make any effort to seek out new music beyond what I hear live and/or diegetically, and virtually everything I really like is mid-90s or earlier

    but that doesn't mean any of it is better or worse

  18. #43
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    I do think there's something to what third and luka were getting at - everything is a transaction, everything is a stealth marketing campaign, etc - that can't be divorced from the art itself

    in the same way you can't divorce aesthetic judgments from production techniques or materials, or distribution channels, or cultural capital, or whatever

    they're all ways of saying no art exists separate from its historical context, I suppose

    but I also think - when was it ever not thus? when were relationships ever not a transaction?

    the marketing techniques are more clever and integrated, but when was there ever a true underground culture?

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  20. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by m99188868 View Post
    take out its weird/eerie drug-related character and you have music merely suitable for fitness clubs, supermarkets, and preteens
    I read this and think, is this is not the inevitable fate of anything?

    to remain in obscurity or to become elevator music and/or the backing for a car, jeans, whatever commercial?

    I mean is this not what Pop Art was onto, like, half a century and more ago?

    (btw, what's wrong with music for "fitness clubs" and preteens, exactly?)

  21. #45
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    to sum up: people will keep making stuff, kids will be into it, old people will wring their hands and say everything was better back when

    humanity will/won't be wiped out by climate change, replaced by algorithms + robots, etc. the future will/won't be utopian/dystopian

    people will make art either way. most of it won't be interesting, some of it will be. judging art at the time of its creation is a fool's errand.

    nothing is new, everything is new.

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